Camas High School will be honoring several Papermakers as they sign their National Letters of Intent on Wednesday, February 5th, 2020 at Camas High School North Commons beginning at 9:00 a.m. You are welcome to attend the event. The following student-athletes will be signing:

SOPHIE FRANKLIN will be signing to play softball for the Wolves of Western Oregon in Monmouth Oregon. Sophie will finish her high school career earning a very impressive eightvarsity letters from Camas High School. Sophie lettered all four years in both slowpitch and fastpitch softball. She has been instrumental in leading the Papermaker slowpitch softball team to two league and two district titles, along with two trips to the state tournament. Sophie’s fastpitchteams have reached the state tournament during all three of her varsity seasons so far earning a 4th place finish in both her freshman and sophomore seasons, and a 7th place finish her junior season. Sophie has earned GSHL All-League 1st team honors all four years in slowpitch, capped with a Player of the Year honor her Junior season. In fastpitch Sophie was GSHL All-League 2ndteam her sophomore season and GSHL All-League 1st team her junior season, with her senior season still to come. While in Monmouth, Sophie will be studying social sciences and American Sign Language. 

Parents Joe and Anneli Franklin – Placing 4th in two state tournaments, and all the bus rides to state and bi-district tournaments. 

BRYCE LEIGHTON is the next Papermaker kicker from a long line of excellence to be moving on to play football in college. Bryce will be playing for the Bobcats of Montana State in Bozeman Montana. Bryce is a three year letterman in football. He is a two time GSHL All-League 1st team award winner, and during his senior campaign was also recognized as 1st team All-State and the very first Papermaker Under Armour All-American. Bryce was an important piece to the Papermaker undefeated state champion team his senior season. While in Bozeman, Bryce will be studying environmental engineering. 

Parents Ryan and Lori Leighton – Memorable moment was winning the 2019 Washington State Championship.

ELIZABETH PARKER is also headed across the river, and she will be playing soccer for the Western Oregon Wolves in Monmouth Oregon. Elizabeth lettered in soccer for the Papermakers three years. During those three years, her teams were GSHL league champions twice and finished with a 3rd place state finish her sophomore year and a 2nd place state finish her junior year. Elizabeth has been recognized as a GSHL All-League player during all of her three seasons with 2nd team honors her sophomore and junior seasons and 1st team honors her senior season. She is a two time GSHL academic All-League award winner, and will study elementary education while playing for the Wolves. 

Parents Scott and Tamar Parker – Memorable moment playing for the state championship in 2018, and Coach Minders stories and his attempt to teach me German. 

RUSH REIMER will be joining his teammate on the football team in Bozeman Montana to play for the Bobcats of Montana State University. Rush is a two year letterman in football and also received a letter for winter cheer. Rush has received GSHL All-League 1st team honors his junior and senior seasons, and was also recognized as 1st team All-State his senior season. His efforts on the offensive line helped the Papermakers to an undefeated season and the schools second state championship in 2019. While playing for the Bobcats, Rush will be studying engineering. 

Parents Eric and Jamie Reimer – Memorable moment winning the state championship in 2019.

Camas High School
www.VixonCabinets.com

ALEXZANDER SAMODUROV will be traveling further than any Papermaker has traveled as he will be playing soccer for Liverpool John Moores University in Brownlow Hill Liverpool United Kingdom. Alexzander will be a four season letterman for the Papermakers lettering in soccer for three seasons and lettered in cross country one season. He has been recognized as GHSL All-League 1st team his sophomore and junior seasons with still his senior season to play. Alexzander also received All-Region selection his junior season for leading the GSHL in assists on the season. In Liverpool Alexzander plans to study engineering. 

Parents Cliff and Jennifer Samodurov – Memorable moment goal against Issaquah in the 2019 season. 

RILEY SINCLAIR is our first Papermaker baseball player to sign in 2020. Riley will be playing for the Redhawks of Seattle University in Seattle next year. Riley will end up a three year letterman for the Papermakers, and led his team to a GSHL league championship, district championship and an appearance in the state tournament his junior season. He was selected as GSHL All-League 1st team and 1st team All-State his junior season with his senior season still yet to play. Riley will study sports science and physical therapy while attending school in Seattle. 

Parents Eric and Marin Sinclair – Memorable moment sweeping Skyview High School junior season. 

TRISTAN SOUZA will be headed east to play football for the Cougars of Washington State University. Tristan is also a three year letterman for the Papermakers and will leave Camas High School as a state champion winning a league and state championship during his senior season in 2019. Tristan has received high recognition playing on both offense and defense for the Papermakers. He is a GSHL All-League 1st team offensive and defensive lineman, along with an All-Region and 1st team All-State defensive lineman. Tristan is undecided on what he will study in Pullman

Parents Aaron MacDonald and Emily Tanner – Memorable moment winning a state championship in 2019.

CAADYN STEPHEN is the third Papermaker offensive lineman to be recognized today, as he will be playing football in Los Angeles California for the University of Southern California Trojans. Caadyn played his freshman and sophomore years in Anchorage Alaska before moving to Camas. He will earn two football letters, one basketball letter and one track and field letter as a Papermaker. Caadyn is also involved with the Camas High School unified basketball program. Although he was injured for most of his senior season, he played a large part in the Papermakers second state championship in 2019. While playing for USC, Caadyn will study business and entrepreneurship. 

Parents Jeremiah and Camie Stephen – Memorable moment winning state championship in 2019. 

LAURISSA TSUKIMURA is signing to play soccer for Pacific University in Forest Grove Oregon. Laurissa has been a part of the girls’ soccer program as well as the Camas High School unified soccer for two years. She is an honors scholarship winner, and has been recognized for several academic awards at Camas High School. While playing soccer for the Boxers, Laurissawill be studying education. 

Parents Lance and Tish Tsukimura –

KENNETH WRIGHT is our fourth Papermaker state champion football player that is moving on to play football at the college level next year. Kenny will be playing for the Orediggers of Colorado School of Mines in Boulder Colorado. He is a three year letterman in football and a one year letterman in basketball. Kenny served as captain of the state championship team and is a four time GSHL scholar athlete award winner, along with a National Football Foundation scholar athlete award winner and to take it a step further he is also a National Merit semifinalist. While in Boulder and wearing Blaster the Burro mascot, Kenny will be studying Civil Engineering. 

Parents Nick and Kristen Wright – Memorable moment winning the 4A team state championship.

Meet 14 year-old Ben Schluter, a Camas High School freshman and two-time Oregon State Champion boxer with an eye on a National title.

Ben won his second consecutive State title on November 30, and even though he lives in Camas, his gym is in Portland, so he fights out of Oregon. 

“I won the State title in Medford, then I go to Regionals in Boise, Idaho on January 6,” Ben said. “If I win that I go to Nationals to compete with kids in the 114-pound division — up to 16 years old. You have to meet certain weight classes and they fight each other, and depending on age it’s 1 minute, 1-minute-30, 2 minutes and 3-minute rounds.” 

Ben competes in 1:30 and 2:00 minute rounds. Has never been knocked out, but has been knocked down. 

“It’s a win by decision at this age group,” said Tim Schluter, Ben’s father. “They place a great deal of emphasis on safety. If they notice a kid getting overwhelmed, they’ll end it. All these bouts are pretty competitive. A vast majority by decisions. It’s not cumulative scoring, it’s round by round. If he wins more rounds than his opponent, then they award him the decision. You don’t know results until they announce it.” 

Everyone has three rounds in amateur boxing, and a win is defined by one of these areas:

  • Knockout
  • Judge stops the fight
  • By decision (if it goes all the way to the very end)

A boxer for seven years, Ben trains at West Portland Boxing every Monday, Wednesday and Friday.

“It’s a little drive but it helps me a lot,” said Ben, the second of four brothers (he’s the only boxer; his brother Cole wrestles for Camas). “My workouts last two hours, but I usually get there early and go run on a treadmill. On my off days I work out at home. I usually run 3-4 miles and work out inside my garage. I do this year round. It helps me with self-discipline. I like getting belts, trophies and lots of wins. And I like hitting people.”

Boxer
Ben loves being a boxer. With his father, Tim Schluter. Photos by Nest and Love Photography. www.NestandLove.com

And, what does mom say?

“My husband goes to the majority of the matches, so he actually travels with Ben often,” said Kim Schluter, Ben’s mother. “Sports like boxing and wrestling are so different, and it’s very one-on-one and individual and it’s given him so much determination, drive and character. It helps in maturity because it’s very individual. He has some great coaches and mentors. I hesitated when he started.” 

Although Ben has boxed since second grade, Tim said it’s only been the last three years where it’s been his singular focus.

Boxing
www.MyHeavensBest.com

“I’ve always been a fan on the sport and we watched it together and he pursued it,” said Tim. “When he was young, it was more casual. The last three years he was single-minded to this sport. There are so many misconceptions about boxing — it’s far more of a mental sport. There are so many kids that are bigger, stronger and faster, but they don’t make it because there’s no drive, persistence or grit. It’s like all sports — it’s an allegory of life. You’re just competing against yourself.”

Ben’s goal is to win every belt.

VIDEO INTERVIEW

Here’s a link to our YouTube video interview with Ben: https://youtu.be/YFyRCDgpOak

What else drives him?

“It’s just seeing the satisfaction of winning, I have a really great coaches: Jason Marquiot and Victor Morales, Sr., and a great mentor with professional boxer Victor Morales, Jr. who attended Union High School,” said Ben. “He has 13 wins, 7 knockouts, and he’s shown me how to keep pressing forward.”

Ben is satisfied with the personal development, which Tim said is hard to see day to day, but comparing past videos makes it more clear. 

Coaching is about learning the basics: straight punches, feet work, how to move, your reaction time, learning learn how to counter. There are lots of workouts, hitting the bag, shadow boxing.

“There’s a group that trains together,” said Ben. “There’s a big group. We have 25 people there, and five or six of them are competing, while others are there to just work out. I really saw that when I first started, then I saw others getting trophies, and belts and wins. There’s a lot of self-motivation. At home workouts, I shadow box at the gym, so here I do jump ropes and running, push ups, sit ups.”

“When I’m done with a tough opponent, a lot of times I feel like I’m gonna throw up. A lot of time I’m really gassed which is why we don’t have two fights in one day.” 

Last year, Ben competed in the 13-14 year bracket at Nationals in Kansas City, Missouri. There are eight regions that meet at Nationals. USABoxing.org is the governing body for all the amateur tournaments.

“I want to win Nationals, just one step at a time,” he said. “It’s a very mental sport, and you try to figure out how to punch and control your anger.” 

After literally a year of preparation, the 2019 Camas Football team clinched Washington’s 4A State Title defeating Bothell 35-14 Satuday bringing home the trophy, a perfect 14-0 record, and the satisfaction of meeting a lofty goal. The Revenge Tour is a wrap.

Lacamas Magazine has reported on the team through 14 game videos, many individual interviews, some articles and a lot of social media posts. After working through the weekend to get those reports to our readers, I had the chance to listen to — and view — those earlier reports and found some common threads about the Revenge Tour.

I also reflected on pre-game conversations with team members at the field and in my own house. I recall when Papermakers Jackson Clemmer and Colin Pearson came home with Jordan Geigenmiller (my third son) following a hot August practice to raid our pantry. It was Clemmer who told me “Papa Giggles, we’re gonna win State this year!” Colin nodded, and Jordan aka “Giggles” just said “yep, dad!”

A few days earlier, I spoke with Papermaker Kenny Wright during the team’s pre-season kickball event. In his interview he said “we’re gonna win them all!” See the video here: https://youtu.be/on-cQ_kY26U

So, that brings us to the first common thread: Determination.

In every interview, whether posted or not, each player was determined to get the win. They were determined to overcome any obstacle. If someone got injured, a player filled the deficit. There was never any doubt about the outcome because it was decided a year ago they’d win the State Title.

I’d hear doubts come from fans, other reporters, and people on the street about the impacts and effects of injuries on key players. Observers said “well, maybe they have a chance at State …”

Note to the doubters: That only fueled their determination. They read those articles, watched those videos, and heard those comments. These boys never doubted they’d win State.

Tai Tumanuvao, O/DL, a talented athlete and well spoken dude, said it best following the win in the semi-finals: “Play where you are … focus on where your feet are, that’s what coach always says …”

So, that brings us to the second common thread: Focus.

I watched several pre-season practices, listened to observer perceptions and could tell they were focused on what they were doing at that moment. Then, after the first quarter of the first game, I really saw it. Following seven years covering CHS sports I thought I’d seen it all, but then I saw the 2019 team in real action. The sideline talk was kept to game focused plays, and there wasn’t a lot off-topic discussions happening. They were focused on the game plan, focused on what the coaches told them, and focused on winning despite whatever mistake may have happened.

“We focus on the moment,” said Charlie Bump, WR. “You shake off what happened five minutes ago, and make the moment you’re in count.”

Undoubtedly, CHS has been coached by the best in the State, and probably some of the best in the nation. Using their God-given talents they’ve led by example and encouraged their players to lead on and off the field making it clear that character counts.

Common
Camas 2019 Football team at the State Championship.
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The Seniors. Class of 2020.

So, that brings us to the third common thread: Leadership.

During these games, I look for the leaders, and typically it’s one of the quarterbacks, but that isn’t always the case. I could see leadership qualities in Tumanuvao, but I also saw them in Jake Blair, Blake Asciutto, Randy Yaacoub, Dante Humble, Tyler Forner, and many others.

So, one night I asked my son about leadership. I asked “which player is leading this team, son?”

His reply: “Dad, it depends on the situation. Sometimes it’s Tai, sometimes it’s Blake, it just depends. We all know when to lead and when it’s time to step back and follow. It’s a brotherhood.”

During his State Championship interview, I asked Wright what are the ingredients to a successful team?

His reply: “Love, friendship, hard work, persistence, we bought into it and believed in ourselves and each other …”

So, that brings us to the fourth common thread: Love.

Yes, you read that right — love! These guys love each other as brothers. They fight as brothers. They correct each other as brothers. They poke fun of each other as brothers. And, when one man is down, they stop what they’re doing and lift up that brother. It’s what families do, and this team was — and probably will forever be — a family.

Watch what Wright, Forner and Kolby Broadbent say about it here: https://youtu.be/KtpXI33nOl0

That love has built up over the years as these boys played CCYF football, Little League, basketball, rugby and other sports together over the years. They built up a working chemistry and connection since elementary school that’s transferred into young adulthood and onto the field.

Camas Football
www.MyHeavensBest.com

The Columbian’s sports writer, Tim Martinez, wrote a brilliant piece a few weeks ago, which we now call the Nebula story. In the article he said: “Part of Camas’ success In 2019 could be rooted in the fact that the Papermakers don’t have a star. They have a nebula. Camas has a roster of really good players who can seemingly step into a key role and perform in a big way. The Papermakers have done it all year.“

Martinez was right. I thanked him personally for writing that article. He nailed it.

So, that brings us to the fifth common thread: Athletic Talent.

You can’t build a State Championship team without athletic talent, and it went all across the spectrum. Camas has the best O Line in the state. QB Jake Blair is gifted, and when he broke his collarbone, Blake Asciutto stood right next to Blair as they assessed his condition. Asciutto took that mantle without missing a beat. Clemmer is a talented wide receiver. Running Back Jacques Badolato-Birdsell is a star. There’s Tyler Forner, Dante Humble, Randy Yaacoub, Bryce Leighton, Rush Reimer, Tristan Souza, Tumanuvao, Tyler Criddle, Bump, and many more.

The doubters kept telling me all week, “but Bothell has an amazing quarterback!”

My reply: “Yes, and that’s what they said about Mount Si. What else would you like to add?”

These boys know they’re talented, and sometimes they do show off, and I think they’re entitled to that, but most of the time they’re focused on getting the job done.

But, why isn’t athletic talent at the top of the list?

“You have to have heart,” said Head Coach Jon Eagle in one of our first interviews. “We can coach anybody who has heart.”

The athletic talent would be nothing without Determination, Focus, Leadership and Love. It would be hollow. See our Championship post-game interview with Coach Eagle, who explains this: https://youtu.be/on-cQ_kY26U

It was great to interview so many players moments after their big State win. It was a surreal moment captured after 12 months of determination, focus, leadership, love and sheer athletic talent. Nicely done, boys. We look forward to seeing what your future brings.

So, that’s my two cents.

A week earlier: https://lacamasmagazine.com/2019/12/theres-one-more-check-on-the-camas-football-revenge-tour-bothell.html

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A CHS player hugs Coach Eagle after winning State.

Camas High School is inviting the public to participate in a public send-off Saturday at 9:30 am as the Papermaker Football team leaves town to head to Saturday’s State Championship game at Mt. Tahoma High School.

The team will travel via two chartered buses and will be escorted by first responder vehicles as it departs the high school at 9:30 am and travels through Downtown Camas on 4th Avenue.

CHS Athletic Director, Rory Oster, confirmed the plans, and encourages as many local residents and fans to line 4th Avenue. The hope is to have people lining the streets at Lutz Hardware and fill both sides of the street down past Natalia’s Cafe, Arktana, Nico Bella Salon, Papermaker Pride, Camas Gallery, Caffe Piccolo, Lizzabeth A, Camas Hotel, Liberty Theatre, Lily Atelier, and as far down the street as possible towards the mill.

Cheer Squad Coach, Brandy Reed encourages fans to bring posters, banners, etc. to show their support.

The Camas Football team (13-0) faces Bothell at 4 pm Saturday for the State Championship. Camas previously won the State title in 2016, which was also an undefeated season.

The team’s self-proclaimed #RevengeTour comes to an end. Here’s a recent article on the team: https://lacamasmagazine.com/2019/12/theres-one-more-check-on-the-camas-football-revenge-tour-bothell.html

Camas Football
www.MyHeavensBest.com

Following the Camas High School Football 35-14 victory over Mount Si in Saturday’s 4A Semi-finals, I made the interview rounds making sure to spotlight the O-line for their efforts then — and all season. During that interview a few comments struck me, especially about the Revenge Tour.

The first was from Offensive Linesman, Tai Tumanuvao, who has been an incredible Papermaker leader all season.

“It’s one game, you play where you are,” said Tumanuvao. “Focus on where your feet are, that’s what coach says.”

Tumanuvao has not just physical athletic talent, he’s been blessed with many other gifts including leadership and a commanding, yet humble voice that demands respect and attention. He leads the post-game team rallies, and it’s been reported he motivates during half-time locker room talks.

The other comment that stood out came from Tight End, Kenny Wright, who said:

“And guess what? Bothell is the last check on the Revenge Tour.”

Yes, the Revenge Tour.

I’ve had dozens of people ask me what that’s all about. We’ve addressed it with the Papermaker Talk interviews that Camas City Council member Deanna Rusch conducted, but it’s worth explaining again.

“We didn’t really do good last season, not as good as we wanted, and we were coming back this year saying we want to bring it, we want to show people what we the Class of 2020 is, so our theme was the Revenge Tour,” said Camas Linebacker, Jack Gibson. “We were in the weight room talking about different things, and we decided that we should make a T-shirt like a concert T-shirt …”

Revenge Tour

So, it’s not about revenge against another team, it’s about revenge against a less-than-stellar 2018 season. It’s revenge against past CHS Football performance. It’s been argued that perhaps a better name would be the Redemption Tour, but it wouldn’t have the same ring.

So, T-shirts were designed by Papermaker Pride, and produced through a generous donation by Stainless Cable and Railing (SC&R). And, after each game players and coaches simply say: “CHECK!”

Revenge Tour represents the determined mental and physical fortitude of a team of young men, trained by committed and focused coaches who are determined to win — on AND off the field. Character matters.

“These players have heart,” said Camas Head Coach, Jon Eagle. “We can coach you if you have heart.”

They travel in packs, as brothers, looking out for each other. On game days, they fuel up at Natalia’s Cafe. After games they head to Don Pedro’s, or as they call it “Donny P’s.” When one brother goes down, they take care of him. They high five Freshmen in the hallways, and most help out in the community at various service projects. There’s an Eagle Scout, and a few more getting ready to make that mark. And, they get good grades.

This Class of 2020, and their underclassmen, are laser focused and have been treating every game like a state championship.

“That’s how we have to do it — treat every game like a state championship,” said Dante Humble, WR/C. “We’re focused.”

They’ve been hit with a string of injuries that cast doubt on future performance from fans and outside observers, but each time a teammate rises to the occasion and fills the deficit. The Papermakers are 13-0 heading into next week’s State Championship against Bothell.

“Our quarterback, Blake Asciutto doesn’t get shaken up,” said Jordan Geigenmiller, WR. “He’s very calm under pressure, and when mistakes are made he rolls them off his back. Plus, we have a chemistry because we’ve all been playing sports together since we were five years old — in Little League, football, rugby, soccer — we connect.”

Geigenmiller realized this was his final week practicing with his brothers as an official team, and the reality started to sink in.

One more check on the Revenge Tour. One more stop.

The best O-Line in the State, from left: Kenny Wright, Rush Reiter, Josue Espinoza, Tai Tumanuvao, Tyler Criddle, and Tristan Souza.
During the National Anthem.

Some numbers from the Semi-finals: CAMAS 35, MOUNT SI 14

Mount Si 7 7 0 0 — 14

Camas 14 7 7 7 — 35

First quarter

Mount Si — Cole Norah TD run (Colby Ramsey XP)

Camas — Jackson Clemmer runs 80 yards on pass from Blake Asciutto (Bryce Leighton XP)

Camas — Jacques Badolato-Birdsell TD run (Leighton XP)

Second quarter

Camas — Badolato-Birdsell TD run (Leighton XP)

Mount Si — Brayden Holt 25 yard pass from Clay Millen (Ramsey XP)

Third quarter

C — Badolato-Birdsell 5-yard TD run (Leighton XP)

Fourth quarter

C — Badolato-Birdsell 2-yard run (Leighton XP)

Seattle, WA – The Camas Jets 12U Pop Warner football team has been invited to compete in a regional qualifying event with top teams moving onto the Pro Football Hall of Fame National Championship in Canton, Ohio. These top teams will compete to the world championship on December 10th-14th at the Johnson Controls Pro Football Hall of Fame Village and Tom Benson Stadium. Every championship game in Canton will be televised or streamed on CBS Sports Network.

The qualifying event will invite top teams from throughout the region to compete for exciting post-season football on Nov. 21st- Nov. 24th in the Northwest Regional in Seattle Washington. Regional qualifying events will take place in the following cities: New York/New Jersey, New Mexico, Richmond VA, Canton Ohio, Dallas Texas, Santa Clara CA, Valley Forge PA, Gulf Shores AL, and Wichita, KS.

Teams will be represented from seven unweighted divisions, four weighted divisions and three all-star divisions.

Teams that qualify for the national championship in Canton will take part in national media day, a red-carpet ceremony with Gold Jackets and the Game for Life program that will provide character development to all athletes and coaches. The program was created by the Pro Football Hall of Fame along with Hall of Famers.

The national selection process is headed by former NFL General Manager, Ray Farmer and National Collegiate Scout, Gary Howard. More than 2,500 top teams from across the country will be considered in 2019.

“We are thrilled to share the vision of the Pro Football Hall of Fame and LEGACY Global Sports with the next generation of promising athletes,” Pro Football Hall of Fame President David Baker said. “This youth championship series, the biggest in the history of youth football, will feature athletes and coaches competing in the most exciting post-season weekend in football with every team aiming for the championship. Just as important, all of these fine athletes, win or lose, will be immersed in the values of football through the Game for Life Program authored by the Pro Football Hall of Fame and its Gold Jacket members that teach life skills that serve athletes beyond the game of football.”

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Camas Jets Pop Warner 12U team.

The championship event is owned by Legacy Global Sports and directed by Richard McGuinness, who created the U.S. Army All-American Bowl on NBC, the Eastbay All- American Game and other top football properties over the past 15 years. McGuinness sold his interest in his previous company to re-imagine the nation’s top showcase events for youth, high school and soon to be NFL athletes through showcase events like the Championship series.

“This national showcase event will bring the nation’s top youth teams and youth athletes together like no other and it will serve as a cornerstone property for football in America. With regional play, a blue-ribbon selection team and a final championship weekend in Canton, this is the ultimate in youth football,” McGuinness said.

Football

By 2020, the championship event will be featured in the indoor football stadium at the village that will include 8,000 seats, a perfect place to celebrate the best in youth football.

“As the world of football recruiting continues to get younger, this event will also serve as the first phase of player identification in the nation. Through our extensive collection of game film from this event along with NFL style evaluations, we are provided a unique opportunity to identify nation’s best youth athletes like no one else,” said National Event Director, Marc Boldurian . “We are excited to invite elite teams such as the East County Camas Jets team to represent their state and compete for regional supremacy in the largest youth championship in the world.”

Team nominations for next year are currently hosted at www.youthfootballchampionship.com
Event sponsors include Xenith, Jet Fuel, Wilson and Shadowman.

Seattle, WA — Camas High School Football Head Coach Jon Eagle was just named Seattle Seahawks Coach of the Week, announced Joe Cronin, Committee Chair for the Seattle Seahawks Coach and Youth of the Week/Year Program.

“Great job this season!” said Cronin. “Always fun to follow the Papermakers. Keep up the great work. Each week during the high school football season, the Seahawks and the Washington State Football Coaches Association select two high school football coaches as the Coach of the Week winners. Congratulations on the season thus far! The Camas Papermakers are off to great start and a huge part of that is your leadership. Nice victory over Bellevue.”

In being named a Seahawks Coach of the Week Eagle will receive:

1. $500 donation to the Camas football program.

2. Framed certificate signed by Seahawks Head Coach Pete Carroll.

3. Named on the Seahawks website as a Seattle Seahawks Coach of the Week, along with the WSFCA website.

4. Receive two tickets to a home football game later this season and be recognized on the field with the other Seattle Seahawks Coaches of the Week recipients.

Eagle has worked tirelessly for years and always gives credit to his fellow coaches and the players.

“I’m not out there on the field doing the hard work,” said Eagle in a recent interview. “These hard-working players are. Our coaching staff is amazing.”

The Seahawks also issued the following statement:

“The Camas Papermakers defeated the Bellevue Wolverines 24-7 in a big non-league game. Coach Eagle has the Papermakers at 4-0 following wins over Lincoln, Hazen and West Valley. Under the leadership of Coach Eagle the Camas Papermakers have been a perennial state contender and a dominant team in the 4A classification. The Papermakers always play with tremendous character, discipline and sportsmanship. Coach Eagle has been a long time member of the WSFCA and is heavily involved.” 

Seahawks
www.lisaleproperties.com

Portland, Ore. — More than 1,500 Cycle Oregon cyclists rolled into Oakridge, Ore., on September 14, completing a seven-day, 430-mile ride through Central Oregon. The flagship ride of Cycle Oregon, the Classic gave participants scenic views of many Oregon natural wonders including the Cascade Mountains and Crater Lake, and the warm hospitality of numerous small towns, including Cottage Grove, La Pine and Diamond Lake – all rolled into a festival-like atmosphere.

The Classic finish also marked the end of a successful season year for Cycle Oregon, a Portland-based nonprofit organization dedicated to transforming individuals and communities through bicycling. Cycle Oregon’s three signature events included: Classic (Sept. 7-14, 2019); GRAVEL, a weekend gravel ride based out of Dufur, Ore. (May 17-19, 2019); and Joyride, a one-day, women-only ride based out of Independence, Ore. (June 22, 2019). Each distinct ride enabled cyclists of all abilities to explore the state’s renowned natural beauty on two wheels, plus connected them with the people, places and businesses of many rural Oregon towns.

All in all, more than 2,400 cyclists from 42 states and seven countries participated in Cycle Oregon’s three 2019 rides, which totaled more than 675 miles and 43,000 feet of elevation gain and contributed hundreds of thousands of dollars to local economies. The three events directly supported eight rural Oregon communities through the hiring of local groups for event support and local spending by cyclists. Cycle Oregon annually provides approximately $160,000 to community groups for the services they provide, ranging from event planning to volunteer organizing.

I marvel at how Cycle Oregon can double a population, be so professional and then be gone before we know it, leaving everyone with a smile on their face,” said Ann Gawith, Executive Director, La Pine Chamber of Commerce. “Even thought they were here for less than 24 hours, these cyclists really impacted our small town. Everyone was busy, from our restaurants and motels to our gas stations – and even our florist! And it was great to see our bike lanes filled with cyclists. Cycle Oregon was a fantastic experience for La Pine.”

All Paws

“Even though Cycle Oregon is now over 30 years old, each ride feels fresh and exciting. The riders bring such positive energy to the state,” said Steve Schulz, Executive Director of Cycle Oregon. “We are incredibly grateful to all the communities across Oregon who welcomed our riders with open arms. While we have undeniably spectacular scenery that was showcased by our 2019 rides – from the eastern end of the Columbia River Gorge to the beautiful Willamette Valley to Central Oregon and the stunning Cascade Mountains and Crater Lake National Park – it’s really the people that make Oregon special.”

Discounted early registration for the 2020 Classic ride is now open online at www.cycleoregon.com, although the routes for all the 2020 events will not be revealed until the 2020 kick-off party on January 29, 2020

Cycle Oregon Fund’s 2019 Cycle Now Open through October 21, 2019

Cycle Oregon’s dedication to transforming lives through cycling is perhaps most visible in the projects around the state in which the Cycle Oregon Fund has invested. This fall, the Cycle Oregon Fund will award approximately $100,000 to local nonprofits working to preserve and protect the special places of Oregon and implement community development projects. Organizations are encouraged to submit applications now through October 21.

Cycle Oregon
Cycle Oregon.

The Cycle Oregon Fund is supported by proceeds from the organization’s rides and managed by the Oregon Community Foundation. Over the last 20 years, the Fund has awarded more than 300 grants totaling $2.2 million, supporting projects ranging from bike racks in Baker City and Yachats to helping purchase land for the Wallowa Band Nez Perce Trail Interpretive Center. 

The Fund supports projects and programs throughout Oregon in three key areas: Environmental Conservation and Historic Preservation, Bicycle Safety & Tourism and Community Projects. Complete guidelines and an online application are available at cycleoregon.com/our-work/our-impact/.

About The Organization

Cycle Oregon is a nonprofit organization dedicated to transforming individuals and communities through bicycling. For riders who want an unparalleled Oregon bicycle experience at their own pace, they hosts a series of fully supported rides that offer a unique perspective of the state, all the while managing every last detail. Established in 1988, Cycle Oregon’s 30-plus years of event logistics and deep roots within the state create an authentic Oregon experience that strengthens communities—on and off the bike. Cycle Oregon attracts more than 4,500 riders from all 50 states and around the world. www.cycleoregon.com #ridecycleoregon

Dozens of supporters from near and far gathered at the Camas High School Main Commons Saturday evening to attend the 6th Camas High School (CHS) Hall of Fame Induction Banquet.

Attendees were greeted by the CHS Marching Band, Cheer Squad and a hearty welcome by Marcia Johnson, the Athletic Hall of Fame Chairperson; then treated to a delicious dinner and a series of tributes and official induction ceremonies.

Six individuals, and two teams were honored during the two-hour Hall of Fame event.

Lauren Rainey, Class of 1948
Introduced by John Skimas and accepted by Barbara Rainey Runyan.

Lauren played basketball, football, and baseball. In his senior year, Lauren set all the scoring records in basketball and led his team to the Washington State Basketball tournament that year. At the State tournament, he averaged 18 points per game! Lauren was also named to the All-Conference Basketball teams during his junior and senior seasons. In addition, Lauren contributed to the 1948 baseball team during his senior year.

Les Morsach, Class of 1958
Introduced by Tom Wallenborn.

From 1955-1958, Morsach played football, basketball, and track. He was a three-year starting varsity quarterback. He was the first Camas QB to lead team to a state championship. Morsach was a SW Washington first team All-Star QB two years in a row. Led team in passing yardage and passing touchdowns all three years, and received a football scholarship from Yakima Community College. He also participated in basketball, where he was a starting guard and in track, where he set school pole vault records.

Donald Huston, Class of 1961
Introduced by his brother, Denny Huston, who said “good coaches teach how to win.”

Huston played baseball and basketball. Two-sport star at Camas High School. He was the starting guard his junior and senior year where he was All League each year. He averaged 12.7 points per game, the assist leader, team captain and always assigned to defend the opponent’s top player. During his senior year, the team record was 19-1 and went to the State tournament for the first time since 1947. Huston also participated in baseball, starting at second base both his junior and senior years. Don then went on to play college basketball at Western Washington University followed by a career in coaching basketball for 25 years.

Bob Cameron, Class of 1971
Introduced by Doug Slyter.

Cameron competed in five sports: wrestling, football, basketball, baseball, and track. He earned 10 Varsity letters during his high school career, and during his sophomore year he qualified for the Washington state wrestling tournament, and in the spring he lettered for the baseball team; at the time a rare accomplishment. His senior year accomplishments included football team MVP, Team Captain, “Black Helmet Award” recipient and All league; baseball MVP, Team Captain, All League and Clark County All-Star; Basketball Team Captain. He was named Outstanding Athlete for CHS his senior year.

Brent Richards, Class of 2008
Introduced by Coach Roland Minder.

Hall of Fame
Brent Richards.

“Brent was quickly the team’s top scorer and won the All-League Academic Award. He was a huge part of our success in earning the State title that year,” said Minder. “He was all about the team. I felt a special bond with Brent and we felt the refiner’s fire. He scored 26 goals with 10 assists his senior year and earned a 4.0 GPA. He was the Columbia Region Player of the Year.”

Career stats: 83 goals, 32 assists. Freshman year: Varsity Offensive Player of the Year, All-Academic Award (3.95 GPA), 2nd Team All-League, League Champion. Sophomore year: Team won State Championship, All Academic Team (3.76 GPA). Junior year: Injured. Senior year: Gatorade State Player of the Year, Regional Player of the Year, and All-League Scholar Athlete (4.0 GPA). Brent also won the State Tournament Player of the Year where his high school team won the state championship. He was drafted by the Portland Timbers and played professional soccer for 10 years.

“There were a lot of people that were inspirational to me, I’m so thankful I got to grow up in this community,” said Richards. “Thank you.”

Coach Roland Minder
Introduced by Steve Hogan.

Coach Minder started his CHS soccer coaching career in 1993 as an assistant in the girls’ program until he was named the head coach in 2004 and served until 2018. He was the boys’ head coach from 1995 to 2017. In 38 seasons as head coach, his teams earned 30 League championships, won 24 District championships, had 33 WIAA State tournament appearances, 22 WIAA State Quarterfinal appearances, 14 WIAA tournament Final Four appearances, eight WIAA state championship game appearances, and earned five WIAA State championships!

Hall of Fame
Coach Roland Minder at Friday’s football halftime show.

Minder has been awarded: League Coach of the Year, Washington State Coach of the Year, NSCAA Regional Coach of the Year, NFHS Sectional Coach of the Year in 2011, NSCAA National Coach of the Year in 2016. His combined record for the boys and girls is: 589 wins, 106 losses and 46 ties.

“The game of soccer has always been an integral part of my life growing up in Switzerland,” said Minder. “It was a long road in building this soccer program. My first priority was to get the club and the high school to work together. It took a while, but we eventually started having success. I was lucky to be in the right place at the right time. I dare describe it as a movement … This award is because of so many people, and represents all those who worked so hard for so many years.”

All Paws

2005 Girls’ Soccer Team
Introduced by Minder.

They won the State Title in 2005, the first time for a Clark County team.

“They’re the greatest girls soccer team to ever play at Camas High,” said Minder.

2006 Boys’ Soccer Team
Introduced by Minder.

The won the State Title in 2006.

“This age group was special,” said Minder. “The coaches had a great rapport with the high school and we all looked forward to the year. Our nemesis was Columbia River, which caused us to place second in league … We defeated Lakeside for the title. I still remember the coach after the game from Lakeside because they were all over us … We had all the players behind the ball and we just defended, defended, defended. It was a phenomenal effort. We had skilled players but we had a great team effort. Everyone bought into the program and this team made history. It was the only time that both the girls and boys teams won a State Title in the same school year.”

At the conclusion, Johnson addressed the audience.

“I want to thank everyone for coming, and for your support,” said Johnson, who organized the event. “I just want to give a special thanks to the Hall of Fame committee. I couldn’t do this without your support. We select teams by application so you have to be nominated. I carry nominations from year to year and we go through tons of information and we select people we feel deserve it for that year. I also want to thank the Camas Athletics Booster Club. It takes a lot of money to do this.”

Hall of Fame
Camas Hall of Fame Inductees at Friday’s football game.

When Washougal dentist and ultra runner, Dave Stinchfield, decided he’d tackle a 200-mile race, he wasn’t totally sure he could do it. But, when he embarked on this remarkable journey that began August 9, deep in the Cascade Mountains, he realized all his preparation running 50K and 100-mile races paid off.

“I was really excited building up to it, I was really excited about the whole thing, but I thought could I actually do this 200-miler? Actually I thought there’s a 50/50 chance, so I was wondering where my weak point was going to be,” said Dave, about a week after the race ended. “There was actually no part of the race where I thought I needed to quit.”

Aided by his wife, Adina; daughter, Morgan; brother, Tom; and a team of pacers and supporters, Dave completed the Bigfoot 200 race in 85 hours, 10 minutes, crossing the finish line at 10:30 pm on August 12.

Making the race successful is a delicate balance of mental stamina, focus, support, proper nutrition, hydration and foot care.

Dave walks us through the adventures of each day.

Day One

“The first part of the race is the Mount St. Helens blast zone, it was like running on the moon, and then going into Coldwater Creek I heard the thunder in the distance,” said Dave. “I was going to get two to three hours of sleep and it was just dumping and the rain was so loud I couldn’t sleep. My next leg was 19 miles that went up 5,000 feet. That’s what I had ahead of me and there was lightning and thunder and I put on all my rain gear and it took me seven hours to get through that section, and it took me on mountain ranges and cliffs. I passed a lot of people who were getting really discouraged. That was the first night.”

The 160+ ultra runners were supported by aid stations (10-15 miles apart) and sleep stations that are dispersed throughout the race. The runners let support staff know they’re ready for sleep, or if they have a vehicle they use those, but you’re not allowed to leave the area. Dave used a roof top tent on his truck, which Adina drove.

Dave
Dave along the trail.

Nutrition

Dave fueled up on breakfast burritos, guacamole, veggie hamburgers, and protein gels eaten along the way. Ultra runners need lots of salt and carbs.

“You need salt because it gets depleted and it makes you tank and you lose your appetite so I was taking salt tabs,” said Dave. “I sweat salt. I drank a lot of water and a lot of electrolytes. I use Tailwind, which is an electrolyte, and it keeps you balanced. I figured I burned about 25,000 calories during the race! I wasn’t able to replace all of that with food. I lost weight. I usually lose 5-10 pounds on these type of races. And, when I was done I really wanted pizza.”

Dave

Day Two

On day two, the storm cleared out and Dave was joined by a pacer named Wes, from Sunnyvale, California, who ran three legs with him, which lasted the whole day and into the next night — a total of 50 miles.

“A lot of the trails were deep rutted and shaped like a V from water run off or motorcycles and there were angled surfaces,” said Dave. “That was the whole 50-mile climbing stretch. He stayed with me until Lewis River camp ground aid station where I got three hours of rest. You have to balance how much you sleep with how far you’re getting behind. I had four time goals set, and I finished only three hours off my awesome goal. I had a really good pace going. I’m typically in top third group and I wanted to stay there in that top third.”

Foot Care

Experienced runners know when you start getting hot spots on your feet that’s where blisters form and you have to take care of it.

“I changed shoes five to six times, and most of the time I’d get wet pretty quick,” he said. “If you run on soaking wet feet it will create worse blisters. After 100 miles I had blisters that hurt with every step. I learned to endure the pain in my feet, but my joints and muscles didn’t hurt too much.”

Dave
Dave and Adina have been married for 26 years.

Day Three

On day three, Dave was joined by his brother, Tom Stinchfield, who ran two legs with his older brother.

“We left there with a river crossing and we went through this thick wet, overgrown trail area that was soaking wet,” said Dave. “I had a bunch of climbing with Tom, and he stayed with me for 25-30 miles. So he got me to the next aid station in the late afternoon and then he dropped off and I got my feet taped off again. A group called Dirtbag Medic was there and they examined everyone’s feet, so I felt like I covered a lot of ground and realized I had 60 miles left. I felt good, my pace was good, my joints and muscles felt really good.”

“So I left that aid station alone and it had four river crossings, one of which had a five-mile relentless climb, and once I got to the top of that it was nighttime. It was 1 or 2 am on Monday and I slept for three hours.”

Dave told Adina he just wanted to wake up at a particular time, and once he laid down flat, he was gone.

“I took my socks off to air out my feet,” he said. “I had a pair of running shoes once size larger because the feet swell up. To prevent foot damage you go to a bigger pair of shoes. Julie, works with Adina, joined me there, and she ran two or three legs with me. That was beautiful, and we went up these areas with gorgeous views of Mt. Rainier and Mount St. Helens and Mt. Adams. We came across a runner who was passing a kidney stone on this ridge out of reach of anybody. He wasn’t able to move anymore. He ended up having the Air National Guard airlifting him out from a ridge up 4,500 feet.”

On these long races, Dave said you have to watch your urine output as you can be totally dehydrated. Urinating regularly is sign you’re properly hydrated. Runners take dirt naps or short breaks at the aid stations, but they’re focused on constantly moving.

Day Four

During one of the updates, Adina reported “Just a marathon left.”

Dave said there were a couple times in the last quarter of the race where nothing would hurt.

“I didn’t feel tired at all, my feet didn’t hurt, it was almost this euphoria,” he said. “I could just take off running way faster than I was going. It was really a runner’s high. I felt I was able to do it with a decent time. Everything feels good, and you just take off running. I did my last leg with Morgan and then she jumped on with a half-marathon to the finish and at that point that was mile 193 and ran into 206.5, which was a nice sunset. I came in around 10:30 pm. The finish line was at White River High School in Randall, WA. You finish on the track right there.”

Dave
Pacers helped along the way.

Lessons Learned

“I learned that with every increase of distance and endurance I was always wondering am I capable of doing that? I learned that it was possible. We’re all going through struggles and I learned I had to take it one chunk at a time. I took it into small little chunks. I think I just got to get to that aid station. I learned I can actually do it. I’m so grateful for Adina and all they pacers that got me through it. That middle section is really tough.”

Would he do it agin?

“Yes, I would do it again. I’m gonna do it again next year.”

There were 160+ runners that started, and 55 dropped the race. Dave was number 35. There were 70 runners that came after him.

“After the race, we went and got some pizza then we went back to the hotel, I took a shower and I went to bed and slept for eight hours. Then I went back to the track in Randall and kept my feet elevated while I watched the runners finish. There were people from all over the world. I made some really good friends and saw people that really struggled and overcame it. I stayed there until 6 pm when the last runner came in.”

He said his feet really hurt for the next four to five days, and a couple of toes are numb.

He uses a couple brands of shoes: Altra and an Italian brand called Los Portiva.

“I think I need different brands to keep my feet guessing. I use Ultimate Direction for gear. I go through two to three pair of shoes at once and they last four to five months.”

“Ultra running is catching on. There’s a slogan that says 200 is the new 100. There are lot of ultra runners out there and the Pacific Northwest is the best place to run with all our trails and varying terrain. People come from all over the world to run here.”

Ultrasignup.com is where you go to sign up for these races, and search for Bigfoot 200 to learn more about this particular race.