As I produced the 2019 Year in Review video, it caused me to think about the major events that defined us, made our eyes pop, or just simply made one grateful to live in this community. So, I compiled a list of Top 6 stories that stirred up those reactions in my heart.

Mayor’s Race + Prop 2

Without a doubt, the Fall election results were both stunning and eye opening. Never in all my years have I seen a proposition go down in such flames (90-10) or have a sitting mayor (Shannon Turk) get voted out by a write-in candidate (Barry McDonnell) with zero political or public service experience.

Proposition 2 was doomed to fail for several reasons, the first of which was the price tag, but it also didn’t go through the proper processes. Voters saw it as rushed and ill-conceived, and didn’t reflect the findings of a months-long pool committee. City workers did their best to come up with a plan under very rushed conditions, and ultimately a series of options were presented to council that allowed voters to make the ultimate decision.

The price tag ($78 million) presented by former City Administrator Pete Capell was something that City Councilor Ellen Burton warned “is all the voters will hear.“ Her words were prophetic.

It’s telling because it shows me that in a society riddled with partisanship we CAN agree on something 90-10. The anti-Prop 2 movement shows us that people of all political persuasions can rally and work together. The synergy created by that movement was enough to generate a wave that upended Camas leadership.

The Camas 2019 Fall election stories are akin to a 100-year storm. You probably won’t see this again in our lifetime.

Stories
Anastasia McDonnel, forefront, listens to her husband, Barry McDonnell, at the Camas Mayoral debate.

Small Business Revolution

When the Small Business Revolution (SBR) team visited Camas in January, Mill Town rolled out the red carpet. When we made Top 6, a town united. It was refreshing to see so many people work to get out the vote. Merchants, students, teachers, civic leaders and athletes all rallied to help Camas become the SBR focus of season 4 of their Hulu show, “Main Street.”

We fell short of the goal, but it was beautiful to see people working together for a common cause. It was fun to cover all the SBR stories.

Stories
Small Business Revolution — Main Street host, Amanda Brinkman, visits with the team at Lily Atelier in Downtown Camas.

Camas Produce Accident

I remember sitting in my office when I got the alert that a vehicle had plowed into Camas Produce. I remember thinking this is the kind of thing that happens in OTHER towns — certainly not here. Arriving at the scene I saw the significant damage done to the quaint and popular store.

The driver was cited with DUI and reckless endangerment, and it took the majority of the year to get the store back online. Each week for months, people inquired about when the store would open, and what they could do to help. We did our best to keep pushing out stories related to this accident, and it’s nice to have the store back.

Camas Producee
Damage at the front.

Love for the Lintons

When Camden Linton was diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumor, the owners at Natalia’s Cafe were asked to help raise money for their family. Erica Slothower, owner of the cafe, along with Wendy Delbosque, worked with Kristen Gardiner, to organize a carnival and silent auction. In a single day, they raised tens of thousands of dollars!

Many hours were spent organizing the event, and it’s a tribute to Natalia’s Cafe and the entire town to see so much love pour into one family in need. I broke down in tears when I witnessed Erica present a can filled with cash. It was one of the stories that define a town.

Stories
Erica Slothower presents Kristen Gardiner with a can of cash.

Stuff The Bus

For the first time, I saw firsthand the behind-the-scenes work of the annual Stuff The Bus campaign. I met with organizers, traveled with students and volunteers to witness the donations be collected and ultimately delivered — and those were reflected in our stories. I also saw the promotions that went into it, and was moved by the video we produced featuring Washougal and Camas School District Superintendents Mary Templeton and Jeff Snell. Seeing two Ph.D’s running through Safeway with carts was both hilarious and priceless. The entire Stuff The Bus campaign shows the generosity of two towns dedicated to lifting up their neighbors.

Here is a Stuff The Bus video report: https://youtu.be/-_bFtCNJpXY and

Stories
www.MyHeavensBest.com

Camas High School Football Wins State Championship

It was a surreal and special moment when I stood next to the young Papermakers as they clinched the 2019 State Title! I’d watched for months (really years) as these boys dedicated themselves to winning — and representing a grateful town.

The boys aren’t perfect, but they’re also unlike any other football team I’ve ever covered. They have character and focus. They have love and respect. They have discipline and drive. They will go down in history as one of the greatest teams to ever represent Camas. The victory is forever theirs.

I can’t wait to release the Revenge Tour documentary later this month.

We look forward to covering the stories of 2020. Stay tuned.

Stories
Camas 2019 Football team at the State Championship.

In 2019, Lacamas Magazine published more than 1,000 stories, videos, and social media posts, so we put together a Year in Review video report that spotlights about half of them in 1 second images.

YOUTUBE VIDEO

Here’s the video link: https://youtu.be/dft0G35QeEg

From sports to politics, dining and news, our company has worked hard to bring current stories in a timely manner.

2019 (January 2, to be specific) started off with the Small Business Revolution (SBR) tour of Camas for two days. Several members of the SBR team, including the show’s star, Amanda Brinkman, started their 10-city tour in Mill Town getting to know merchants and held a town celebration at Grains of Wrath. They filmed several segments at local stores and restaurants, and brought the attention of local news stations.

In December, the Camas High School football team won the 4A State Championship defeating Bothell 35-14 at Mt. Tacoma Stadium. The boys named the season “Revenge Tour” and finished with a perfect 14-0 record.

In between, there were major accidents, a contentious Fall election, sports championships, along with tragedies and triumphs.

Review
www.MyHeavensBest.com

Meet 14 year-old Ben Schluter, a Camas High School freshman and two-time Oregon State Champion boxer with an eye on a National title.

Ben won his second consecutive State title on November 30, and even though he lives in Camas, his gym is in Portland, so he fights out of Oregon. 

“I won the State title in Medford, then I go to Regionals in Boise, Idaho on January 6,” Ben said. “If I win that I go to Nationals to compete with kids in the 114-pound division — up to 16 years old. You have to meet certain weight classes and they fight each other, and depending on age it’s 1 minute, 1-minute-30, 2 minutes and 3-minute rounds.” 

Ben competes in 1:30 and 2:00 minute rounds. Has never been knocked out, but has been knocked down. 

“It’s a win by decision at this age group,” said Tim Schluter, Ben’s father. “They place a great deal of emphasis on safety. If they notice a kid getting overwhelmed, they’ll end it. All these bouts are pretty competitive. A vast majority by decisions. It’s not cumulative scoring, it’s round by round. If he wins more rounds than his opponent, then they award him the decision. You don’t know results until they announce it.” 

Everyone has three rounds in amateur boxing, and a win is defined by one of these areas:

  • Knockout
  • Judge stops the fight
  • By decision (if it goes all the way to the very end)

A boxer for seven years, Ben trains at West Portland Boxing every Monday, Wednesday and Friday.

“It’s a little drive but it helps me a lot,” said Ben, the second of four brothers (he’s the only boxer; his brother Cole wrestles for Camas). “My workouts last two hours, but I usually get there early and go run on a treadmill. On my off days I work out at home. I usually run 3-4 miles and work out inside my garage. I do this year round. It helps me with self-discipline. I like getting belts, trophies and lots of wins. And I like hitting people.”

Boxer
Ben loves being a boxer. With his father, Tim Schluter. Photos by Nest and Love Photography. www.NestandLove.com

And, what does mom say?

“My husband goes to the majority of the matches, so he actually travels with Ben often,” said Kim Schluter, Ben’s mother. “Sports like boxing and wrestling are so different, and it’s very one-on-one and individual and it’s given him so much determination, drive and character. It helps in maturity because it’s very individual. He has some great coaches and mentors. I hesitated when he started.” 

Although Ben has boxed since second grade, Tim said it’s only been the last three years where it’s been his singular focus.

Boxing
www.MyHeavensBest.com

“I’ve always been a fan on the sport and we watched it together and he pursued it,” said Tim. “When he was young, it was more casual. The last three years he was single-minded to this sport. There are so many misconceptions about boxing — it’s far more of a mental sport. There are so many kids that are bigger, stronger and faster, but they don’t make it because there’s no drive, persistence or grit. It’s like all sports — it’s an allegory of life. You’re just competing against yourself.”

Ben’s goal is to win every belt.

VIDEO INTERVIEW

Here’s a link to our YouTube video interview with Ben: https://youtu.be/YFyRCDgpOak

What else drives him?

“It’s just seeing the satisfaction of winning, I have a really great coaches: Jason Marquiot and Victor Morales, Sr., and a great mentor with professional boxer Victor Morales, Jr. who attended Union High School,” said Ben. “He has 13 wins, 7 knockouts, and he’s shown me how to keep pressing forward.”

Ben is satisfied with the personal development, which Tim said is hard to see day to day, but comparing past videos makes it more clear. 

Coaching is about learning the basics: straight punches, feet work, how to move, your reaction time, learning learn how to counter. There are lots of workouts, hitting the bag, shadow boxing.

“There’s a group that trains together,” said Ben. “There’s a big group. We have 25 people there, and five or six of them are competing, while others are there to just work out. I really saw that when I first started, then I saw others getting trophies, and belts and wins. There’s a lot of self-motivation. At home workouts, I shadow box at the gym, so here I do jump ropes and running, push ups, sit ups.”

“When I’m done with a tough opponent, a lot of times I feel like I’m gonna throw up. A lot of time I’m really gassed which is why we don’t have two fights in one day.” 

Last year, Ben competed in the 13-14 year bracket at Nationals in Kansas City, Missouri. There are eight regions that meet at Nationals. USABoxing.org is the governing body for all the amateur tournaments.

“I want to win Nationals, just one step at a time,” he said. “It’s a very mental sport, and you try to figure out how to punch and control your anger.” 

by Rick Francisco

Parenting during the holidays can be tough no matter the situation. From planning dinner to arranging the perfect family picture, meeting your obligations may require a little help. The holidays are also uniquely difficult for families going through divorce, undertaking new child custody matters, and those struggling with past or ongoing domestic violence.

The first step in providing a healthy home for your child is to relieve your own stress. If you are going through a divorce or simply unhappy with your current shared parenting time, speaking with an attorney experienced in managing these types of issues will provide a calm to the holidays when you need it most.

Second, planning ahead will reduce issues that can arise this year and the next. What happens if your tradition is to celebrate the holidays in Miami, but the child’s other parent wants to travel to Boston for New Years? We have helped countless clients determine the solution best suited to meet their family’s needs and the children’s school schedules.

Parenting
Attorney Rick Francisco

Finally, holiday events can bring people together for better and for worse. If you believe an individual intends to harm you or your child, there are steps we can take to help you avoid situations which may be dangerous. When you feel secure in your home, you can truly enjoy the company of your loved ones.

Instead of worrying about meeting deadlines and filing paperwork, we want to get you back to the best parts of the holidays. Minus the fruitcake.

Contact the law firm of McKean Smith today for a consultation. Visit www.McKeanSmithLaw.com

Washougal, WA — First grade students at Cape Horn-Skye Elementary learned the joy of giving by creating toys and blankets for dogs and cats residing at the West Columbia Gorge Humane Society (WCGHS).    

“This experience was about empathy, caring for those less fortunate, in this case, animals,” said CH-S first grade teacher Darcy Hickey.  “The students have been so excited for this project.  It has become a first-grade tradition at CH-S.”  

Students in Taryn Tedford’s and Nichol Yung’s first grade classes also participated. 

Cathi Parent, Community Engagement Manager with WCGHS, came to CH-S to collect the gifts and talk with students about the shelter and their animals.  She discussed ways that cats and dogs end up there, the foster program, success stories for animals, and volunteer activities.  She also brought Purrgie the cat, a three-year-old tabby, who was a big hit with students.  

“We love seeing children and youth of any age wanting to get involved in helping their local community and give back,” said Parent. “Their interest in helping animals is very heart warming.  Many of these pets may have come from unwanted homes or were strays and never knew real love before. Living in a shelter situation, even though they are being taken very good care of and loved on by volunteers, can still be stressful.  Having items like the blankets and toys that were made by the students, can help make their time at the shelter that much better.”

Students also learned about the importance of microchipping pets in case they get lost, spaying and neutering to control the pet population, and the process they go through to help pets get adopted. Parent made sure students were calm, quiet, and moved slowly as they approached Purrgie, who let anyone who wanted to meet her provide ear rubs, back scratches, and pets.  

Students

“The project also helps to meet a Washington State standard in Social and Emotional Learning (SEL),” Hickey explained. “This work provides an opportunity for students to consider others and show a desire to contribute to the well-being of our community”

Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) is broadly understood as a process through which individuals build awareness and skills in managing emotions, setting goals, establishing relationships, and making responsible decisions that support success in school and in life. 

First grader Jojo Stevenson thought it was fun to make blankets and toys for these animals.  “I hope these gifts make them happy,” she said.  “I want them to stay warm and stay alive.” 

The timing of this challenge was not a coincidence.  “We wanted to send kids off on their two-week break thinking about the joy of giving and that giving of yourself can bring as much joy and excitement as receiving,” Hickey explained.   “We are so proud of these students.”

To learn more, visit https://wcghs.org

Each year, many Washougal School District high school and middle school band students apply to be a part of regional and state honor bands. These bands select the top musicians from the region or state, and students spend several days together rehearsing and performing under the baton of conductors from major universities and professional ensembles. Congratulations to these Washougal schools students that have been selected to be a part of these ensembles. 

Washington Music Educators Association All-State Honor Groups:

 – Amara Farah, clarinet (Chamber Orchestra)

 – Barret Hemminger, trumpet (Wind Symphony)

Pacific Lutheran University Northwest High School Honor Band:

 – Amara Farah, clarinet

 – Thomas Hein, trumpet

 – Grace Jacobsen, trumpet

 – Matthew Condon, trombone

 – Lexi Kneipp, flute

 – William Weihl, percussion

Band

North County Honor Band:

 – Amara Farah, clarinet

 – Thomas Hein, trumpet

 – Grace Jacobsen, trumpet

 – Braxden Zumwalt, trumpet

 – Lexi Kneipp, flute

 – Mary Lendvoyi, flute

 – William Weihl, percussion

 – Spencer Perkins, percussion

 – Jace Poulsen, percussion

 – Hunter Thacker, baritone saxophone

 – Hayden Zumwalt, trombone

Canyon Creek Middle School – All 8th graders

LCRMEA Honor Band

Avery Berg – Alto Saxophone

Avri Kaufman – Oboe

PJ Hopmeier Mitchell – Euphonium

Lukas Sanders – Trumpet

Kyler Buck – Clarinet

Bentley Jarman Baritone Saxophone

North County Honor Band

Avery Berg – Alto Saxophone

Kyler Buck – Clarinet

Justin Bryden – Trombone

Lorelie Peck – Bass Clarinet

Jemtegaard Middle School – All 8th graders

LCRMEA Honor Band Students: 

Joseph Yantis – Bass clarinet

Claire Zakovics -Flute

Emily Wade – Clarinet

Kacee Kearney – Flute

Seth Dodenhoff – Bass clarinet

Tanner Lowe – Trumpet

North County Honor Band students: 

Danica Stinchfield – French Horn

Jacob Kettelson – Euphonium

Barrett Justis – Euphonium

To learn more, visit Washougal schools: http://www.washougal.k12.wa.us/blog/home/home-test/

Washougal, WA — New and returning Washougal School District (WSD) School Board members were sworn in to service at the December 10, 2019 board meeting after winning in the general election on November 5.  Superintendent Dr. Mary Templeton administered the oath of office. 

Jim Cooper was elected as the newest member to the WSD Board to represent District 1. Cooper brings a background as a college professor, higher education administrator, scientist, and business owner to the school board.   

Board President Cory Chase (District 4) and member Angela Hancock (District 2) were re-elected in the November general election, and will serve four-year terms that expire in 2023. 

Photos and article by Lester Brown, of WSD.

To learn more, visit http://www.washougal.k12.wa.us

Here’s a recent article about WSD: https://lacamasmagazine.com/2019/12/washougal-school-board-approves-resolution-for-replacement-levies.html

Washougal
www.VixonCabinets.com

After literally a year of preparation, the 2019 Camas Football team clinched Washington’s 4A State Title defeating Bothell 35-14 Satuday bringing home the trophy, a perfect 14-0 record, and the satisfaction of meeting a lofty goal. The Revenge Tour is a wrap.

Lacamas Magazine has reported on the team through 14 game videos, many individual interviews, some articles and a lot of social media posts. After working through the weekend to get those reports to our readers, I had the chance to listen to — and view — those earlier reports and found some common threads about the Revenge Tour.

I also reflected on pre-game conversations with team members at the field and in my own house. I recall when Papermakers Jackson Clemmer and Colin Pearson came home with Jordan Geigenmiller (my third son) following a hot August practice to raid our pantry. It was Clemmer who told me “Papa Giggles, we’re gonna win State this year!” Colin nodded, and Jordan aka “Giggles” just said “yep, dad!”

A few days earlier, I spoke with Papermaker Kenny Wright during the team’s pre-season kickball event. In his interview he said “we’re gonna win them all!” See the video here: https://youtu.be/on-cQ_kY26U

So, that brings us to the first common thread: Determination.

In every interview, whether posted or not, each player was determined to get the win. They were determined to overcome any obstacle. If someone got injured, a player filled the deficit. There was never any doubt about the outcome because it was decided a year ago they’d win the State Title.

I’d hear doubts come from fans, other reporters, and people on the street about the impacts and effects of injuries on key players. Observers said “well, maybe they have a chance at State …”

Note to the doubters: That only fueled their determination. They read those articles, watched those videos, and heard those comments. These boys never doubted they’d win State.

Tai Tumanuvao, O/DL, a talented athlete and well spoken dude, said it best following the win in the semi-finals: “Play where you are … focus on where your feet are, that’s what coach always says …”

So, that brings us to the second common thread: Focus.

I watched several pre-season practices, listened to observer perceptions and could tell they were focused on what they were doing at that moment. Then, after the first quarter of the first game, I really saw it. Following seven years covering CHS sports I thought I’d seen it all, but then I saw the 2019 team in real action. The sideline talk was kept to game focused plays, and there wasn’t a lot off-topic discussions happening. They were focused on the game plan, focused on what the coaches told them, and focused on winning despite whatever mistake may have happened.

“We focus on the moment,” said Charlie Bump, WR. “You shake off what happened five minutes ago, and make the moment you’re in count.”

Undoubtedly, CHS has been coached by the best in the State, and probably some of the best in the nation. Using their God-given talents they’ve led by example and encouraged their players to lead on and off the field making it clear that character counts.

Common
Camas 2019 Football team at the State Championship.
Common
The Seniors. Class of 2020.

So, that brings us to the third common thread: Leadership.

During these games, I look for the leaders, and typically it’s one of the quarterbacks, but that isn’t always the case. I could see leadership qualities in Tumanuvao, but I also saw them in Jake Blair, Blake Asciutto, Randy Yaacoub, Dante Humble, Tyler Forner, and many others.

So, one night I asked my son about leadership. I asked “which player is leading this team, son?”

His reply: “Dad, it depends on the situation. Sometimes it’s Tai, sometimes it’s Blake, it just depends. We all know when to lead and when it’s time to step back and follow. It’s a brotherhood.”

During his State Championship interview, I asked Wright what are the ingredients to a successful team?

His reply: “Love, friendship, hard work, persistence, we bought into it and believed in ourselves and each other …”

So, that brings us to the fourth common thread: Love.

Yes, you read that right — love! These guys love each other as brothers. They fight as brothers. They correct each other as brothers. They poke fun of each other as brothers. And, when one man is down, they stop what they’re doing and lift up that brother. It’s what families do, and this team was — and probably will forever be — a family.

Watch what Wright, Forner and Kolby Broadbent say about it here: https://youtu.be/KtpXI33nOl0

That love has built up over the years as these boys played CCYF football, Little League, basketball, rugby and other sports together over the years. They built up a working chemistry and connection since elementary school that’s transferred into young adulthood and onto the field.

Camas Football
www.MyHeavensBest.com

The Columbian’s sports writer, Tim Martinez, wrote a brilliant piece a few weeks ago, which we now call the Nebula story. In the article he said: “Part of Camas’ success In 2019 could be rooted in the fact that the Papermakers don’t have a star. They have a nebula. Camas has a roster of really good players who can seemingly step into a key role and perform in a big way. The Papermakers have done it all year.“

Martinez was right. I thanked him personally for writing that article. He nailed it.

So, that brings us to the fifth common thread: Athletic Talent.

You can’t build a State Championship team without athletic talent, and it went all across the spectrum. Camas has the best O Line in the state. QB Jake Blair is gifted, and when he broke his collarbone, Blake Asciutto stood right next to Blair as they assessed his condition. Asciutto took that mantle without missing a beat. Clemmer is a talented wide receiver. Running Back Jacques Badolato-Birdsell is a star. There’s Tyler Forner, Dante Humble, Randy Yaacoub, Bryce Leighton, Rush Reimer, Tristan Souza, Tumanuvao, Tyler Criddle, Bump, and many more.

The doubters kept telling me all week, “but Bothell has an amazing quarterback!”

My reply: “Yes, and that’s what they said about Mount Si. What else would you like to add?”

These boys know they’re talented, and sometimes they do show off, and I think they’re entitled to that, but most of the time they’re focused on getting the job done.

But, why isn’t athletic talent at the top of the list?

“You have to have heart,” said Head Coach Jon Eagle in one of our first interviews. “We can coach anybody who has heart.”

The athletic talent would be nothing without Determination, Focus, Leadership and Love. It would be hollow. See our Championship post-game interview with Coach Eagle, who explains this: https://youtu.be/on-cQ_kY26U

It was great to interview so many players moments after their big State win. It was a surreal moment captured after 12 months of determination, focus, leadership, love and sheer athletic talent. Nicely done, boys. We look forward to seeing what your future brings.

So, that’s my two cents.

A week earlier: https://lacamasmagazine.com/2019/12/theres-one-more-check-on-the-camas-football-revenge-tour-bothell.html

Common
A CHS player hugs Coach Eagle after winning State.

At its regular meeting on Tuesday, November 26, the Washougal School District (WSD) Board of Directors approved two levies — a replacement Educational Programs and Operations Levy (EPO) and a replacement Technology Levy to be placed on the February 11, 2020 ballot.  

The levies would replace the current levies, which are set to expire December 31, 2020.  

The Educational Programs and Operations Levy funds services and operations not funded by state or federal funding. These services include: health and safety; instructional support; athletics, musical after school activities, coding club (and other enrichment activities); student learning and staffing; security personnel; and operations and maintenance.

Levy dollars cover innovation projects, such as a Strings (orchestra) program. They could also cover a dual language immersion program. 

The proposed Educational Programs and Operations Levy rates are projected to remain flat over the next three years (2021, 2022, and 2023) at $2.14 per $1,000 of assessed value (is projected on assessed value growth).  They levy is projected to collect $7,392,656 in the first year of collection, $7,984,068 in 2022, and $8,622,793 in 2023. 

“What was right for our district was also right for Camas School District,” said Dr. Mary Templeton, Superintendent of Washougal School District. “The Levy provides the funding that allows our district to invest in students, gives us capacity to innovate, and ensures we keep programs that let us nurture and challenge all students so that students rise every day. We are just trying to restore the pre-McCleary dollars that voters agreed to.

“We think the $2.14 allows us to grow and stay fiscally responsible. We think this investment that the local dollar makes in that is critical. This all lines up with our vision statement. We value the dollars that we get greatly, and we don’t want to collect one more dollar that we need knowing we must be responsible and efficient.”

Levies

Technology Levy dollars pay for the district’s 1:1 initiative, up-to-date computers and devices, classroom instructional technology, professional development and coaching, technology infrastructure and staffing, and curriculum and software.

“We’ve been very successful with the use of technology,” Templeton said. “We’ve see great student achievement with how we’re using tech in the classroom. We are, of course, hoping voters will support these efforts in the district. We do appreciate the opportunity to let the voters know this investment will support our children to be prepared for college. What you need to know as you graduate into the world has change significantly in the last 10-15 years.”

The proposed Technology Levy rates are projected to decline over the three years of the levy, with the rate per $1,000 of assessed value at $0.25 in 2021, $0.24 in 2022, and $0.22 in 2023.  The Technology levy is projected to collect $845,000 in the first year of collection, $870,000 in 2022, and $898,000 in 2023.

For more information about the levies, visit the WSD website: www.washougal.k12.wa.us

As part of a Camas High School DECA marketing and fundraising program, several teams of students designed coffee labels and continue to sell coffee through Thursday, December 5.

The coffee bags cost $10 per bag and are roasted locally from BJ’s Coffee Roasters in Vancouver, WA

There are two offerings:

  • Primo Blend (Ground/Whole Bean) — One of their most popular blends. Smooth, mild and crisp for an excellent morning coffee. Medium Roast.
  • Espresso Blend (Whole Bean) — Their espresso blend consists of four very distinct origins. Together these coffees produce an espresso that is rich in flavor, with full body and luscious crema. Medium Roast.

Please make checks payable to Camas High School.  Students must collect money and turn it in for full order fulfillment.  There is an option to pay with the CHS online system, but your order must be paid no later than Thursday, December 5th. Click this link:  https://wa-camas-lite.intouchreceipting.com/decacoffee/

Your order will be ready for delivery (by students) or pick up at CHS Lunch Box by Friday, December 13th. 

Camas DECA
Some of the coffee labels CHS students created.

“Camas DECA is donating 60 percent of their profits ($3 per bag) to the C.A.R.O.L. program that is coordinated with the Camas Fire Department,” said Camas DECA adviser, Suzie Downs. “The program provides food and gifts to families in Camas and Washougal who are struggling to make ends meet. The other $2 profit will go to Camas DECA to help offset competition travel costs.”

If you have any questions, please contact Suzie Downs at: suzie.downs@camas.wednet.edu

The Camas DECA coffee project is part of the Marketing 1/Intro to Business curriculum to teach students about product branding and entrepreneurship. Each class is marketing and selling their own unique brand label to compete with the other three participating classes. This project helps students understand what it takes to brand a product, take it to market, sell it. They also have to deal with competition, as there are three other businesses selling coffee to their target market — you!

Camas DECA