At its regular meeting on Tuesday, November 26, the Washougal School District (WSD) Board of Directors approved two levies — a replacement Educational Programs and Operations Levy (EPO) and a replacement Technology Levy to be placed on the February 11, 2020 ballot.  

The levies would replace the current levies, which are set to expire December 31, 2020.  

The Educational Programs and Operations Levy funds services and operations not funded by state or federal funding. These services include: health and safety; instructional support; athletics, musical after school activities, coding club (and other enrichment activities); student learning and staffing; security personnel; and operations and maintenance.

Levy dollars cover innovation projects, such as a Strings (orchestra) program. They could also cover a dual language immersion program. 

The proposed Educational Programs and Operations Levy rates are projected to remain flat over the next three years (2021, 2022, and 2023) at $2.14 per $1,000 of assessed value (is projected on assessed value growth).  They levy is projected to collect $7,392,656 in the first year of collection, $7,984,068 in 2022, and $8,622,793 in 2023. 

“What was right for our district was also right for Camas School District,” said Dr. Mary Templeton, Superintendent of Washougal School District. “The Levy provides the funding that allows our district to invest in students, gives us capacity to innovate, and ensures we keep programs that let us nurture and challenge all students so that students rise every day. We are just trying to restore the pre-McCleary dollars that voters agreed to.

“We think the $2.14 allows us to grow and stay fiscally responsible. We think this investment that the local dollar makes in that is critical. This all lines up with our vision statement. We value the dollars that we get greatly, and we don’t want to collect one more dollar that we need knowing we must be responsible and efficient.”

Levies

Technology Levy dollars pay for the district’s 1:1 initiative, up-to-date computers and devices, classroom instructional technology, professional development and coaching, technology infrastructure and staffing, and curriculum and software.

“We’ve been very successful with the use of technology,” Templeton said. “We’ve see great student achievement with how we’re using tech in the classroom. We are, of course, hoping voters will support these efforts in the district. We do appreciate the opportunity to let the voters know this investment will support our children to be prepared for college. What you need to know as you graduate into the world has change significantly in the last 10-15 years.”

The proposed Technology Levy rates are projected to decline over the three years of the levy, with the rate per $1,000 of assessed value at $0.25 in 2021, $0.24 in 2022, and $0.22 in 2023.  The Technology levy is projected to collect $845,000 in the first year of collection, $870,000 in 2022, and $898,000 in 2023.

For more information about the levies, visit the WSD website: www.washougal.k12.wa.us

As part of a Camas High School DECA marketing and fundraising program, several teams of students designed coffee labels and continue to sell coffee through Thursday, December 5.

The coffee bags cost $10 per bag and are roasted locally from BJ’s Coffee Roasters in Vancouver, WA

There are two offerings:

  • Primo Blend (Ground/Whole Bean) — One of their most popular blends. Smooth, mild and crisp for an excellent morning coffee. Medium Roast.
  • Espresso Blend (Whole Bean) — Their espresso blend consists of four very distinct origins. Together these coffees produce an espresso that is rich in flavor, with full body and luscious crema. Medium Roast.

Please make checks payable to Camas High School.  Students must collect money and turn it in for full order fulfillment.  There is an option to pay with the CHS online system, but your order must be paid no later than Thursday, December 5th. Click this link:  https://wa-camas-lite.intouchreceipting.com/decacoffee/

Your order will be ready for delivery (by students) or pick up at CHS Lunch Box by Friday, December 13th. 

Camas DECA
Some of the coffee labels CHS students created.

“Camas DECA is donating 60 percent of their profits ($3 per bag) to the C.A.R.O.L. program that is coordinated with the Camas Fire Department,” said Camas DECA adviser, Suzie Downs. “The program provides food and gifts to families in Camas and Washougal who are struggling to make ends meet. The other $2 profit will go to Camas DECA to help offset competition travel costs.”

If you have any questions, please contact Suzie Downs at: suzie.downs@camas.wednet.edu

The Camas DECA coffee project is part of the Marketing 1/Intro to Business curriculum to teach students about product branding and entrepreneurship. Each class is marketing and selling their own unique brand label to compete with the other three participating classes. This project helps students understand what it takes to brand a product, take it to market, sell it. They also have to deal with competition, as there are three other businesses selling coffee to their target market — you!

Camas DECA

Following the Camas High School Football 35-14 victory over Mount Si in Saturday’s 4A Semi-finals, I made the interview rounds making sure to spotlight the O-line for their efforts then — and all season. During that interview a few comments struck me, especially about the Revenge Tour.

The first was from Offensive Linesman, Tai Tumanuvao, who has been an incredible Papermaker leader all season.

“It’s one game, you play where you are,” said Tumanuvao. “Focus on where your feet are, that’s what coach says.”

Tumanuvao has not just physical athletic talent, he’s been blessed with many other gifts including leadership and a commanding, yet humble voice that demands respect and attention. He leads the post-game team rallies, and it’s been reported he motivates during half-time locker room talks.

The other comment that stood out came from Tight End, Kenny Wright, who said:

“And guess what? Bothell is the last check on the Revenge Tour.”

Yes, the Revenge Tour.

I’ve had dozens of people ask me what that’s all about. We’ve addressed it with the Papermaker Talk interviews that Camas City Council member Deanna Rusch conducted, but it’s worth explaining again.

“We didn’t really do good last season, not as good as we wanted, and we were coming back this year saying we want to bring it, we want to show people what we the Class of 2020 is, so our theme was the Revenge Tour,” said Camas Linebacker, Jack Gibson. “We were in the weight room talking about different things, and we decided that we should make a T-shirt like a concert T-shirt …”

Revenge Tour

So, it’s not about revenge against another team, it’s about revenge against a less-than-stellar 2018 season. It’s revenge against past CHS Football performance. It’s been argued that perhaps a better name would be the Redemption Tour, but it wouldn’t have the same ring.

So, T-shirts were designed by Papermaker Pride, and produced through a generous donation by Stainless Cable and Railing (SC&R). And, after each game players and coaches simply say: “CHECK!”

Revenge Tour represents the determined mental and physical fortitude of a team of young men, trained by committed and focused coaches who are determined to win — on AND off the field. Character matters.

“These players have heart,” said Camas Head Coach, Jon Eagle. “We can coach you if you have heart.”

They travel in packs, as brothers, looking out for each other. On game days, they fuel up at Natalia’s Cafe. After games they head to Don Pedro’s, or as they call it “Donny P’s.” When one brother goes down, they take care of him. They high five Freshmen in the hallways, and most help out in the community at various service projects. There’s an Eagle Scout, and a few more getting ready to make that mark. And, they get good grades.

This Class of 2020, and their underclassmen, are laser focused and have been treating every game like a state championship.

“That’s how we have to do it — treat every game like a state championship,” said Dante Humble, WR/C. “We’re focused.”

They’ve been hit with a string of injuries that cast doubt on future performance from fans and outside observers, but each time a teammate rises to the occasion and fills the deficit. The Papermakers are 13-0 heading into next week’s State Championship against Bothell.

“Our quarterback, Blake Asciutto doesn’t get shaken up,” said Jordan Geigenmiller, WR. “He’s very calm under pressure, and when mistakes are made he rolls them off his back. Plus, we have a chemistry because we’ve all been playing sports together since we were five years old — in Little League, football, rugby, soccer — we connect.”

Geigenmiller realized this was his final week practicing with his brothers as an official team, and the reality started to sink in.

One more check on the Revenge Tour. One more stop.

The best O-Line in the State, from left: Kenny Wright, Rush Reiter, Josue Espinoza, Tai Tumanuvao, Tyler Criddle, and Tristan Souza.
During the National Anthem.

Some numbers from the Semi-finals: CAMAS 35, MOUNT SI 14

Mount Si 7 7 0 0 — 14

Camas 14 7 7 7 — 35

First quarter

Mount Si — Cole Norah TD run (Colby Ramsey XP)

Camas — Jackson Clemmer runs 80 yards on pass from Blake Asciutto (Bryce Leighton XP)

Camas — Jacques Badolato-Birdsell TD run (Leighton XP)

Second quarter

Camas — Badolato-Birdsell TD run (Leighton XP)

Mount Si — Brayden Holt 25 yard pass from Clay Millen (Ramsey XP)

Third quarter

C — Badolato-Birdsell 5-yard TD run (Leighton XP)

Fourth quarter

C — Badolato-Birdsell 2-yard run (Leighton XP)

Washougal WA — Congratulations to the Cape Horn-Skye Science Olympiad team who competed on November 16 at the SW Region A Tournament at Clark College in Vancouver. The team of 18 fifth grade students earned 1st place in Rockets, 2nd place in Weather, 3rd in Benthic Bugs and 4th in Electricity. 

The group met once a week for two months under the leadership of CH-S teachers Darcy Hickey and Hana Gustely.  

“My favorite part about this year has been bringing in community members such as water resource educators, a pilot, an electrician, and a retired science teacher to talk with the kids about their field of expertise,” said Gustely.  “We had a lot of hands-on time as well as a field study along the nature trails near our school.”

Gustely is proud of how confident and supportive the students were during the event.

“They not only learned a lot of science, but practiced perseverance, problem solving and teamwork,” she said. “After this experience, some students may choose to participate in our school’s after-school STEM club, and then they will have another opportunity to participate in Science Olympiad at Washougal High School.”

“I see science as a gateway subject,” explained Penny Andrews, CH-S principal.  “Science helps to students to be curious, innovative, engaged and active in hands on work.  We hope students will take lessons they have learned in the study of science to their math and reading work.  It is a win-win for everybody.” 

Science Olympiad is an international nonprofit organization devoted to improving the quality of science education, creating a passion for learning science and providing recognition for outstanding achievement in science education by both students and teachers. These goals are accomplished through classroom activities, research, professional development workshops and the encouragement of intramural, district, regional, state, national and international tournaments.

The Camas School Board voted unanimously Monday night to approve Levy Rate Resolution 1902, which restores the 2017 voter-approved levy, and brings an additional $4.05 million in district revenue through 2021.

The levy calls for $2.15 per $1,000 of assessed property value, and becomes effective January 2020. The 2018 McCleary legislation cut the Camas School District levy authority in half, which contributed to budget deficits and staff reductions. In 2019, the Washington State Legislature authorized school districts to levy up to $2.50. The current levy is $1.50.

“If we stayed at $1.50 there would be no added revenue,” said School Board member, Connie Hennessey. “At $2.15, it brings in an additional $4.05 million, which puts us at the amount voters approved before McCleary.” 

School Board member Tracey Malone said “We have to be good stewards of the taxpayer money” while School Board member Erika Cox felt “very comfortable with $2.15.”

“We had authority by the state to go to $2.50 but we felt $2.15 honors what the taxpayers approved in 2017,” said CSD Communications Director, Doreen McKercher.

The board also voted unanimously to increase contingency funds for The Heights Learning Center Seismic Upgrade Project, as well as approve final acceptance of Energy Services Agreement for district-wide projects.

WSSDA Conference

The board spent November 21-24 at the Washington State School Director’s Association (WSSDA) Annual Conference. Superintendent Jeff Snell addressed topics learned at the conference, which include the following:

  • Budget process
  • Communication with community
  • Social emotional learning
  • Changes in law/requirements/procedures
  • Best practices related to inclusion, highly capable, pathways to graduation
  • Hot topics around the state
Levy
The resolution was unanimously passed by the Camas School Board.

Legislative Priorities

Snell also identified CSD’s legislative priorities:

  1. Continue progress towards fully funding special education: Ensuring students served through special services have full access to their basic education, continues to require the use of CSD’s local enrichment levy. Possible solutions are 1) increase the multiplier for each special education student; and 2) lower the threshold required to attain safety net funding.
  2. Sustain regionalization: Regionalization factors for some districts begin declining in 2020-21, 1% per year. It is unclear why this is the case, and this is challenging CSD give the cost per employee will continue to rise annually. Possible solution: Do not phase out funding using “regionalization” existing factors over time.
  3. Update staff allocation formulas: The staffing allocations in the Prototypical School funding need updating. Not only are schools staffed beyond the allocations in important areas such as mental health and safety, the cost of each staffing unit exceeds the funding received. This is particularly evident in funding school administrators. Possible solutions: Begin phasing in updated ratios to achieve more realistic state-funding staffing levels and increase funding levels to better reflect market rate for positions; and follow recommendations of OPSI prototypical workgroup.
  4. Monitor the impact of School Employees Benefit Board (SEBB): As the new employee benefits system is implemented, assess the additional costs for school districts and the impact of enrichment levies. Possible solutions: Fully fund the cost of employee health benefits for all eligible employees; and, if unable to fully fund employer costs, adjust eligibility to reduce costs and align revenues and expenditures for SEBB.
Levy
Family Law • Business Law • Employment Law • Criminal Law • Estate Planning • Call today: 360.502.7022

Monthly Budget Report

Jasen McEathron, Director of Business Services, presented his monthly budget report. In the August 2019 Budget Status, preliminary vs. final, the numbers are: 

  • General Fund: Minor accrual adjustments
  • Revenues: August revenues increased about $118,000.
  • Expenditures: August expenditures increased $317,000.

September 2019 status:

  • Capital Projects Fund — LGO Bond revenues of $5.27 million were received to reimburse the fund used to purchase the Underwriters Laboratory property.
  • Debt service — normal 

October 2019 budget status:

  • General Fund: Local tax revenues of $3.62 million.
  • ASB Fund: Normal activity
  • Transportation vehicle fund — normal activity

Enrollment: 

  • Head count: 7,407
  • Basic enrollment continues at about 2.2 percent.
  • Running Start is up 10 percent this year.
  • CTE numbers are holding strong as well with over 7 percent growth in 9-12.

The CSD School Board meeting is held twice a month.

Outgoing Camas Mayor, Shannon Turk, presided over her final City Council meeting Monday night — a busy evening in which council members voted on several ordinances and resolutions.

Earlier in the day, at the Council public workshop, Downtown Camas Association Executive Director, Carrie Schulstad, publicly thanked Turk and Council Member Deanna Rusch for their years of public service, and presented them with mugs full of candy.

“Thank for you what you did for Camas,” said Schulstad.

Several firefighters publicly thanked Turk and Rusch, who were both defeated in the November 5 election. Camas School Board member, Erika Cox, also expressed her gratitude toward Turk, who has served Camas for years: 7 as city councilor, and 1 as Mayor.

Cox said the following: “Your passion for educating our neighbors on processes, and your encouragement for involvement was evidenced by your volunteering in our schools, your mentorship of Camas High School youth, the club CYAC for civic-minded students, your years as a council member, and your service about volunteering for an appointment as mayor in the middle of a resignation, during your service to Camas in a myriad of ways I’ve mentioned you’ve inspired young leaders, you’ve encouraged your neighbors to be involved, and you’ve given hours upon hours representing our city …”

Rusch also expressed gratitude.

“It’s been a pleasure to serve you the last two years,” said Rusch. “It’s probably been one of the best things I’ve done in my life so thank you for the opportunity. The results of the election are disappointing but I will not love Camas any less … it’s really easy for these things to tear us apart, but I’m hoping that these things bring us together …”

Council
From left: Council member Deanna Rusch, Port of CW Commissioner John Spencer, and DCA Vice President Randy Curtis.

Lake/Everett Roundabout

At workshop, Camas city staff provided an update on the Lake/Everett Road roundabout, which continues to progress. They also showed a video of the finalized landscaping selection, which uses native and hearty ornamental species (including the Camas lily) for easy maintenance. It was noted that the city will repurpose a lot of the cut trees into benches.

Brady Road Project

The Brady Road project is progressing well, thanks to good weather. However, staff has run into soil underneath the road that is softer than expected, requiring excavation and replacement of a stronger base.  Costs right now are $250,000 on this phase of the project. Cost overruns on this project are budgeted, said the city, which expected the project to cost $6.2 million, but it was bid at $5.6 million.

New Staff Positions

Council members approved, as part of the 2020 budget re-adoption, the addition of three new city staff positions: Communications Manager, Economic Development Manager, and School Resource Office for Camas High School.

Council member Bonnie Carter emphasized how citizens want better communication so she is very supportive of the new Communications Manager position.

Council
Camas resident Margaret Tweet objected to the creation of an Economic Development Manager.

In the public comments, resident Margaret Tweet objected to the creation of the Economic Development Manager position.

“The city is not running these businesses or operating these businesses,” said Tweet. “There are things the city can do to help a business to help attract a company. Sometimes economic development work is non-sensical. I remember Paul Dennis and the former mayor taking credit for Sharp. It’s important to understand these economic development groups take credit for things they don’t do. The marketing aspect isn’t always what it’s cracked up to be. We need to see an audit report of CWEDA (or Camas-Washougal Economic Development Association).”

To which Mayor Turk replied: “The audit is ongoing, and we can see there are things need to be changed. In the past year, the CWEDA board put into place the requirement of agenda, minutes, and audits. We set up a treasurer and there is public review of payouts being made. There were a lot of growing pains, and we are working to correct them. The audit report will be made public.” 

Council
www.VixonCabinets.com

Property Tax Levy

After receiving final assessed values from the Clark County assessors office, Council members voted to approve the next levy, which will be $3.11 per $1,000 of assessed value. By law, the property tax levy cannot exceed one percent annually.

Camas Library Bond

Council also voted to make a final payment on the 20-year Camas Library bond, which is $610,000, or about 12 cents per $1,000 of assessed value.

Hagensen/Webberly Annexation

The Hagensen/Webberly Annexation was presented by Robert Maul, and calls for annexing property just north of Camas High School into city limits. The council voted 4-3 to reject the annexation at this time. Here’s how the vote was split:

  • Carter: Yes
  • Burton: No
  • Smith: No
  • Anderson: No
  • Hogan: No
  • Rusch: Yes
  • Chaney: Yes

Block Grant to Rehabilitate 12th Avenue

Council voted to apply for a community development block grant of $250,000 to make extensive repairs to 12thAvenue.

Emergency Rescue Fund 2020

Council voted to support a levy to raise $21,000 for the Emergency Rescue Fund.

Crown Park Improvements

Council votes to amending the city of Camas 2019-2020 budget ordinance to include improvements to Crown Park, which includes new bathrooms.

Parks and Recreation Meetings Location Change

Council voted to move the location of Parks and Rec meetings from Lacamas Lodge to City Hall so the proceedings can be recorded.

At the close of the meeting, Turk expressed a heartfelt statement about public service. Please click the link to watch this short video: https://youtu.be/1s6ROYInCug

Mayor-Elect Barry McDonnell will be sworn into office on December 2.

Washougal, WA — Washougal Police were out in force the morning of November 13 at the Washougal High School parking lot to catch students. Catch them doing good, that is! Students who were found wearing seat belts were rewarded with a $5 gift card from Dutch Bros Coffee.  This was a part of the Target Zero Safe Driving Task Force “Click it Bro” program in partnership with Unite! Washougal.

“It feels good to be out here to reward good behavior,” said Washougal School District Resource Officer and WHS Alumni, Kelly Anderson. “It is great to be working with Target Zero on this and reinforce the importance of seat belt use.”

The Target Zero program believes our culture should motivate people to aspire to become safe drivers, in the same way, smoke-free environments are now valued.

“We need our culture to embrace, celebrate, and promote the responsibility each of us has to be a safe road user,” said Hillary Torres, Region 6 Target Zero Manager. “When we reach this place, being a safe driver will not only be important for our own self-esteem and sense of belonging, but it will also be the foundation to ensure the safety of our family, friends, neighbors, and colleagues.”

Through a grant from State Farm, Target Zero provided one hundred $5 Dutch Bros certificates for high school drivers “caught doing the right thing” by wearing their seat belts at five area high schools throughout Clark County. Dutch Bros matched this with an additional $500 of gift certificates. These certificates are being given out by School Resource Officers at each location.

“Unite! Washougal is excited to be leading on the organization of this project,” said Margaret McCarthy, Unite! Drug Free Community Program Coordinator. “This is also an excellent way of promoting positive relationships between law enforcement and our youth.”

Torres and McCarthy attended statewide prevention training and through discussions, discovered opportunities to work together and are planning to bring several future programs to Washougal.

Target Zero

“A group of WHS ASB students called PEP Unite! are the leaders of this project,” said Megan Kanzler, Unite! Drug Free Community, Youth Engagement Coordinator, Washougal Youth to Youth Advisor and WHS Interact Advisor. “They are a leadership workgroup that is focused on positively engaging people in their community. A part of their work was to collect data on student seatbelt use at the high school before today and then follow up to see if the program helped to change behavior.”

On September 26, PEP Unite! members volunteered to stuff envelopes with the Dutch Brothers certificates and appreciation awards to be distributed by SROs at WHS and other schools. Washougal Mayor and Rotary member, Molly Coston, also volunteered to help.

“Steps like Target Zero are moving us in the right direction around safe driving to make our community a better place to live,” Coston said. “I appreciate the idea of saying thank you for positive behavior.”

“It’s all about community,” said Brianna Gonser, WHS Interact President. “It is about being positive and about being safe. All the Target Zero partners have the same mindset and values, which is cool. It is great to
notice the positive. The positive does exist and is worth celebrating.”

WHS juniors Olivia Dinnel and Brianna Ruth were stopped on their way into the parking lot as a part of the program.

“At first I wondered what the officers were doing and did not know what to expect,” said Ruth. “I think it is really cool that they are giving rewards for wearing seat belts. I think it will work to encourage other students to wear them.”

“We need to collectively make safe driving not just normal, but admirable,” said Torres. “Together we can improve safe driving beliefs and behaviors until we reduce the risk of death and serious injury to zero — because every life counts.”

Target Zero is a call to action. It shakes the roots of the belief that “accidents happen” and that the loss of life and health are acceptable outcomes of driving. Other initiatives they support include signaling, not
speeding, and avoiding driving while distracted.

Target Zero
Rewarding good behavior.

Washougal WA – Washougal High School held their second annual Pathways Conference for students on Thursday, November 7.  This year’s focus was careers in Hospitality, Tourism, Human Services, Ag, Food and Natural Resources.  The event was designed to prepare students for the world of work while bringing a more personal approach to the standard “Career Day.”

“We’re really trying to provide students with exposure to a professional conference setting while giving them an ‘up close and personal’ learning experience from local business folks about career pathways that are of interest to them,” said Margaret Rice, Washougal School District Career and Technical Education Director.

Conference planning began last year in order to identify and recruit a wide variety of professionals to speak.

“We had representatives from Disney College to Agri business to event planning,” said Lisa Leonard, WSD Career Specialist and Work Site Learning Coordinator.  “We are so grateful to all of our speakers who took time out of their busy day and away from their businesses to share their expertise.  Many were either Washougal residents, alumni or own a business in Washougal.”

The conference keynote speaker was WHS Alumni Matthieu Grant, who spoke about opportunities and skills needed to work for Disney.  Other break session speakers included Drew Bergerson, Quest Events; Alex Yost, Our Bar; Mychal Dynes, Little Conejo; Michelle Weeks, Good Rain Farm; Robert Hensley, iFill Cup; Nathan Day, You Move Me; Beth Nelson, United Flight Attendant; Tera Yano, Sea Mar; Jayodin J. Mosher NIC-M, Interpreter for Sorenson; and LaDonna Davis, Cosmetology, Hairy Kari’s.

Pathways
www.MeuPilates.com

After a morning of speakers, students loaded buses to visit either Ilani Casino in Ridgefield or Skamania Lodge in Stevenson.   

“Both businesses went out of their way to show students a wide variety of career
opportunities,” Leonard said.

The Ilani Casino Human Resources representatives provided Pathways Conference students with a complete overview of career opportunities as well as a tour of their guest services.  

“They were very encouraging to the students,” said Leonard. “You could tell they are very passionate about what they do.”  

Students also heard about the company’s tuition reimbursement for full-time employees and how they promote from within.

“Students were able to hear about every aspect of guest services at Skamania Lodge,” said Leonard.  “The team there is great!  Our Culinary teacher would hope to build an apprenticeship program with Skamania for students interested in hospitality careers.”

“Our goal is to have a Pathway Conference each year covering all 16 Career Clusters over a 4-year period that way our students the opportunity to participate in a different conference each year of their high school
career,” said Rice.

Seattle, WA – The Camas Jets 12U Pop Warner football team has been invited to compete in a regional qualifying event with top teams moving onto the Pro Football Hall of Fame National Championship in Canton, Ohio. These top teams will compete to the world championship on December 10th-14th at the Johnson Controls Pro Football Hall of Fame Village and Tom Benson Stadium. Every championship game in Canton will be televised or streamed on CBS Sports Network.

The qualifying event will invite top teams from throughout the region to compete for exciting post-season football on Nov. 21st- Nov. 24th in the Northwest Regional in Seattle Washington. Regional qualifying events will take place in the following cities: New York/New Jersey, New Mexico, Richmond VA, Canton Ohio, Dallas Texas, Santa Clara CA, Valley Forge PA, Gulf Shores AL, and Wichita, KS.

Teams will be represented from seven unweighted divisions, four weighted divisions and three all-star divisions.

Teams that qualify for the national championship in Canton will take part in national media day, a red-carpet ceremony with Gold Jackets and the Game for Life program that will provide character development to all athletes and coaches. The program was created by the Pro Football Hall of Fame along with Hall of Famers.

The national selection process is headed by former NFL General Manager, Ray Farmer and National Collegiate Scout, Gary Howard. More than 2,500 top teams from across the country will be considered in 2019.

“We are thrilled to share the vision of the Pro Football Hall of Fame and LEGACY Global Sports with the next generation of promising athletes,” Pro Football Hall of Fame President David Baker said. “This youth championship series, the biggest in the history of youth football, will feature athletes and coaches competing in the most exciting post-season weekend in football with every team aiming for the championship. Just as important, all of these fine athletes, win or lose, will be immersed in the values of football through the Game for Life Program authored by the Pro Football Hall of Fame and its Gold Jacket members that teach life skills that serve athletes beyond the game of football.”

Football
Camas Jets Pop Warner 12U team.

The championship event is owned by Legacy Global Sports and directed by Richard McGuinness, who created the U.S. Army All-American Bowl on NBC, the Eastbay All- American Game and other top football properties over the past 15 years. McGuinness sold his interest in his previous company to re-imagine the nation’s top showcase events for youth, high school and soon to be NFL athletes through showcase events like the Championship series.

“This national showcase event will bring the nation’s top youth teams and youth athletes together like no other and it will serve as a cornerstone property for football in America. With regional play, a blue-ribbon selection team and a final championship weekend in Canton, this is the ultimate in youth football,” McGuinness said.

Football

By 2020, the championship event will be featured in the indoor football stadium at the village that will include 8,000 seats, a perfect place to celebrate the best in youth football.

“As the world of football recruiting continues to get younger, this event will also serve as the first phase of player identification in the nation. Through our extensive collection of game film from this event along with NFL style evaluations, we are provided a unique opportunity to identify nation’s best youth athletes like no one else,” said National Event Director, Marc Boldurian . “We are excited to invite elite teams such as the East County Camas Jets team to represent their state and compete for regional supremacy in the largest youth championship in the world.”

Team nominations for next year are currently hosted at www.youthfootballchampionship.com
Event sponsors include Xenith, Jet Fuel, Wilson and Shadowman.

According to Tuesday’s results from the Clark County Elections Office, write-in Camas Mayoral candidate Barry McDonnell has won the election with 3,545 votes, or 52.74 percent of the vote.

Camas Mayor Shannon Turk received 2,757 votes, or 41.01 percent, and Camas City Councilor, Melissa Smith, also a write-in candidate received 420 votes, or 6.25 percent.

McDonnell, who works in Loss Prevention for Sephora, announced his write-in candidacy in early October and aligned himself to the No to Prop 2 movement (pool bond) accusing the city government of not being transparent enough in the process, and not communicating well with Camas voters.

The timing of the news caught the McDonnell family by surprise, said Barry’s wife, Anastasia.

“Barry is currently on a business trip in California, and we were expecting this news on Wednesday,” said Anastasia. “He’s currently meeting with his boss, and isn’t available for an interview right now. We’ve just been immersing ourselves in everything from planning to GMA. We are thrilled! We are so excited! This is everything we hoped for! It happened in 34 days! It was incredible the response we got from the community.”

Mayoral
wwww.MeuPilates.com

“We pushed but they responded, and that response is going to change the future of Camas, and it is thrilling to think about. The fact that we have someone new in office will be great. It will be advantageous, it will be exciting. It will be a whole new world.”

“The first thing he will do is meet with everyone, every head of every department and hear their concerns, and see what their ideas are for the future. Then he’ll sit down with the city councilors and hear their concerns. From there he will start doing round tables with community members, and that will be a lot of work. We will move forward in a positive way.”

This story will be updated.

The election will be certified on November 26, and McDonnell will be sworn in on December 2.

Photos by Nest and Love Photography.

McDonnell
Anastasia McDonnel, forefront, listens to her husband, Barry McDonnell, at the Camas Mayoral debate. Photo by Nest and Love Photography.