Camas, WA — Following a thorough recruitment process, the City of Camas announced that Shaun Ford will be the next Division Chief of EMS for the Camas-Washougal Fire Department. 

Ford will assume the position effective Feb. 1, 2023. 

Ford was one of four finalists initially brought in to interview for the Fire Chief position. However, after Cliff Free was selected, Ford applied to be the Division Chief.  

According to Fire Chief Cliff Free, Ford stood out as the clear choice for the role.

“Shaun Ford has a passion for EMS; is an accomplished EMS Educator; and has demonstrated the ability to manage a high functioning EMS system,” said Chief Free. “I believe Shaun has the skill set and motivation to guide CWFD’s EMS program in providing the best possible EMS care for our citizens,” he said.

Ford most recently served as Chief of the North County EMS and Clark County Fire District 13 in Yacolt, Washington.  Prior to that, Ford served as the Training Division Chief for North Country EMS and as EMS Division Chief for Clark County. Ford has over 20 years of experience in emergency services. 

The Camas High School Athletics Department celebrated 11 student-athletes Wednesday who are making their commitments to higher institutions as part of national signing day by signing their National Letter of Intent.

Each of these seniors have made an impact in their particular sport and now look to challenge themselves at the next level.  

“We wish each of them the best as they forge their paths in the years to come both in the classroom and in their arenas,” the department said in a statement.

In Alphabetical Order:

Zach Blair is a four-year Football and three-year Baseball letterman who is committing to play baseball at Oregon State University.  Zach was part of a state champion football team in 2019, and won three league titles in football and one more in baseball over the past four years.  A first team all-league recipient in both sports, Zach also was named to the first team all-state team as a junior.

Gracie Buzzell is a four-year Cross-Country and Track letterman who is committing to run at Oregon State University.  Gracie was part of teams that placed second and fifth in the state meet, while also taking home two individual district championships.  She served as team captain and was a four time scholar athlete award winner. 

Adrianna Cortes is a two-year Soccer letterman at CHS who is committing to play soccer at Pacific University.  Adrianna was part of 2021 League, Bi-District, and State Champion girls soccer team.  She won accolades from Max Preps as the State Player of the Week, and looks to continue her work in sports medicine by pursuing a major in athletic training and/or physical therapy.

Campbell Deringer is a four-year Swimming letterman who is committing to swim for the University of Nevada Reno.  A four-time first team all-league athlete, Campbell was also the GSHL and All Region swimmer of the year this year.  She won four district championships and finished second in the state in two events this year. 

Maxwell Fraser is a four-year Baseball letterman who is committing to play baseball for Washington State University.  A two-time first team all-league player, Max looks to continue his success this spring.  He was a key part of the league champion team in 2022 that secured a state berth. 

Letter
Eleven CHS students participated in today’s event.

Boston Jensen is a four-year Baseball letterman who is committing to play baseball at Tacoma Community College.  Boston has been part of teams that have taken home both league championships and made it to the state sweet 16.  He has displayed his leadership on the field as a team captain and looks to continue to lead the Papermakers this spring.

Ryan McClaskey is a three-year Baseball letterman who is committing to play baseball at Lower Columbia College.  Ryan was part of a team that took home a league title on the diamond in 2021.  Ryan’s talents on the mound often turn heads in the stands, and he looks to build on his successes at the next level.

Riley Parbon is a two-year Track and Cross-Country letterman who is committing to row at the University of Alabama.  Riley placed second at the American Lake Fall Classic, first at the Portland Fall Classic, and first at a Dual Regatta meet.  Riley will pursue Elementary Education at Alabama and looks forward to contributing to their rowing program for the next four years.

Natalie Peddie is a four-year Cross-Country letterman at CHS who is committing to run for Seattle Pacific University.  Natalie was part of three district champion teams, she won the individual district title in 2022, and finished 16th in the state as well.  Off the course, she took home both the CHS Pride Inside award as a model student and the district wide Milltown Pride Award. 

Aaron Sung is a three-year Baseball letterman who is committing to play baseball for Whitworth University.  Aaron was a key part of the 2022 league champion team that secured a state berth.  After winning the team’s most improved player award in 2022, Aaron looks to build on his successes this spring and in Spokane with the Pirates.

Cami Young is a two-year Volleyball letterman at CHS who is committing to play volleyball at California Lutheran University.  Cami was a leader both on the court and in the huddle with teams that won league titles in 2021 and 2022.  Both years they continued on to the state tournament.  Cami also provided leadership by taking part in a sportsmanship summit her senior year.

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The event was well attended.

OLYMPIA – Governor Jay Inslee has appointed Trang Lam, the director of the Camas Parks and Recreation Department, to the state Recreation and Conservation Funding Board.

The Recreation and Conservation Funding Board awards about $200 million in grants every 2 years to local governments, tribes, nonprofits and state and federal agencies to create outdoor recreation opportunities, such as parks and trails. The board also awards grants to conserve the state’s natural resource heritage by protecting working farms and forests and wildlife habitat, including places inhabited by plants and animals found nowhere else in the world.

“Trang will be a wonderful addition to the board,” Inslee said. “She brings vital experience in public service, land use and recreation. Her experience serving disadvantaged communities will help us invest resources fairly and equitably across the state.”

Lam has more than 15 years of experience in the public sector, 5 of which are in the parks and recreation field, and 7 years running a private company.

In 1979, Lam and her extended family fled Vietnam as refugees and settled in Portland. She later earned a bachelor of arts degree from Portland State University and ran her family’s food manufacturing business before entering public service.

In 2006, Lam began working for the Portland Development Commission, where she held many positions, mostly focusing on neighborhood redevelopment, engaging historically underserved populations and businesses owned by people of color and managing high-profile real estate transactions, economic development initiatives and public-private partnership programs. In 2016, Lam went to work for the City of Portland, where she served as both the property and business development manager and then the Parks and Recreation Bureau deputy director. In 2019 she moved to the University of Portland as associate vice president for land use and planning before becoming the Camas parks director in 2021.

“We are very excited that Trang will be joining the board,” said Ted Willhite, chair of the Recreation and Conservation Funding Board. “We are looking forward to her bringing her unique skills to the board and helping us carry out our mission to protect and enhance Washington’s great natural and recreational resources for people living here today and generations to come.”

Lam lives in Washougal with her husband. Her term will run through December 31, 2025.

Kelso, WA — The Camas Papermaker Boys Swim team defeated the Union Titans 100-65 Tuesday night.

It’s a sport of numbers, seconds, tenths of seconds and even though Union won five events, including two relays, they didn’t have the sheer numbers to defeat Camas.

Union dominated the first event, the 200 Medley Relay (1:38.15) with powerhouse swimmers Owen Robertson, Steven Empey, Alex Wahlman, and Sammy Empey, a Jr. National athlete.

Sammy Empey won the second event, the 200 Free in a four-man heat with Papermaker Nathan Kim placing second. 

Papermaker James Crawford won the 200 IM (2:03.30).

Mountain View’s Owen Wong won the 50 Free (:22.15).

Sammy Empey earned another victory in a brilliantly executed 100 Fly (50.26) with Nathan Kim placing second.

Titan Alex Wahlman placed first in the 100 Free (50.28).

James Crawford also won the 500 Free (5:05.62). 

Swim
Union High School swimmers (from left): Alex Wahlman, Steven Empey, Owen Robertson, and Sammy Empey.

Camas swimmers Nathan Kim, Henry Webster, Sahn Kim, and Ryan Tanner won the 200 Free Relay (1:31.08) missing the State cut by .5 seconds.

“Don’t worry, we will get the State cut at Districts,” said Webster.

Papermaker Aarmav Krishna won the 100 Back event (1:00.78).

Papermaker Sahn Kim handily won the 100 Breast event (1:01.78).

And, Union’s powerhouse relay team (Wahlman, Robertson, Empey and Empey) won the 400 Free Relay (3:17.39) earning a State cut. The Camas relay placed second, also earning a State cut.

The boys compete next at Mark Morris this Saturday.

Swim
Camas swimmer Henry Webster.

Camas, WA (Union High School) — The Papermakers wrestling team (boys and girls) sent seven of their athletes to finals at this weekend’s Clark County Wrestling tournament. 

The two-day event was hosted by Union, a wrestling powerhouse, and regular winner of the annual meet. 

Junior Jackson Lougan (182) and seniors Regan Fallon-Small (125) and Ava Addie Wunderli (140) won their weight brackets after some hard fought matches.  

Four other Papermaker’s made it to finals: Luke Wagner, Elliott Scott, Simon Jarrell, and Avery Vega- Padilla, a freshman. 

Union finished the tournament with the most points in the boys division with 234 points. The Titans got first-place finishes from Jordin Jimenez (126), Noah Koyama (132), Armando Nicacio (152) and Clayton Maus (215) — see his victory in Stories.

The Papermakers finished second with 199 points led by  champion Lougan.

Champions in the boys tournament included Liam McKee (106) of Hockinson, Brody Davis (113) of Washougal, Owen Pritchard (138) and JJ Schoelein (170) of Skyview, Tennyson Kurtz (145) of Columbia River, Nathan Wadleigh (160) of Mountain View, Seth Blick (195) of Prairie and Austin Steinbach (285) of Heritage.

Washougal edged Union 99-96 to win the girls title, thanks to Panther Kiersten Lees. 

Union earned championships with Niah Cassidy (120) and Janessa O’Connell (130) and Virginia Thomason (190) — see Stories.

Other girls champions were Maritza Sanchez (105) of Hudson’s Bay, Delilah Governor (110) of Hockinson, Uruwa Abe (115) of Ridgefield, Kaytlynn Honga (145) of Kelso, Sofia Aragon (155) of Seton Catholic, Aaliyah Young (170) and Faith Tarrant (235) of Prairie.

Wrestling
Camas wrestler Addie Wunderli.

Camas, WA — “A century in the books!” That’s the slogan that will help the Camas Library celebrate a momentous occasion – turning 100 years old. And, library administrators have organized multiple events to commemorate this milestone. 

The library’s official birthday will be celebrated April 4, 2023; however, the library has a full slate of activities throughout the entire year to mark this amazing feat. And it all starts with a special edition centennial library card, which is only available during 2023. For those that already have a library card, you may swap your current one out free of charge.

Upcoming Events

History Speaks (Speaker Series)

Six speaking engagements will take place throughout the year to inform citizens and to illuminate Camas’ illustrious past. The first in the series is the official kick-off for the centennial year.

Women Who Shaped Camas

Saturday, Jan. 21, 2 pm, Garver Theater

Barbara Baldus, a founder of the Library’s Second Story Gallery; Nan Henriksen, former mayor of Camas; local historian Virginia Warren, and Carrie Schulstad, executive director of the Downtown Camas Association,  will lead a panel discussion moderated by Bradley Richardson, executive director of the Clark County Historical Museum. 

Other Speaking Events (All at the library):

  • The Forgotten Front: Gender, Labor, and Politics in Camas, Washington, and the Northwest Paper Industry, 1913-1918 (April)
  • Will the 2020s Roar like the 1920s? (May)
  • A Promise Not Yet Fulfilled: The Chinook Struggle for Recognition (July)
  • Legendary Locals Author Event with Rene Carroll (September)
  • Whiskey and Wiretaps: The Northwest’s Rumrunning King (November)

The Library Turns 100

Tuesday, April 4, 10 am–8 pm

Stop by the Library anytime during open hours to celebrate the Library’s big day. There’ll be music, goodies and giveaways.

Second Story Gallery

Each of the Library’s six Second Story Gallery shows will have a connection to the centennial in 2023. Read below for the first two shows, covering January – April.

Read All About It (January & February)

This show will consist of reproduced cover pages from the local newspaper, which was originally called LaCamas Post and is now The Camas-Washougal Post-Record. The headlines will be drawn from the first 50 years of the paper’s life, 1908-1958. The reproduced cover pages will reveal to patrons a snapshot of what was happening in our community throughout these years, while also highlighting the local coverage of regional events and reporting on national headlines. The opening reception is Friday, Jan. 6, 5-8 pm.

A Century in the Books (March & April)

This exhibit will showcase a timeline of Library milestones over the past 100 years. From the initial conception for a public library space to the current building on 4th Ave., enjoy a walk-through time to see historical photos and learn interesting facts from the past century. The opening reception is Friday, March 3, 5-8 pm.

This just a sampling of the upcoming year, which will include programs for all ages, events around town, and historical documents you may explore online. Residents interested in taking part can also be on the lookout for upcoming library story and memory requests. 

More information at https://www.cityofcamas.us/library

Working in the media is mostly a lot of fun, but it definitely has its moments. Our First Amendment calls for a free press, and I believe that principle is vital to a successful, free and thriving society.

But, with that comes great responsibility. It’s about getting out correct, accurate and verified information. The business of reporting finds myself with knowledge of good things, fun events, but also negative behavior. 

I find myself with knowledge of negative behaviors (on the part of local respected leaders, educators, influencers, etc.) on a more regular basis (fact checked and verified) and this trend is disturbing — and growing.

It’s a growing trend of narcissism, arrogance, and entitlement — and it happens because so many look the other way. They don’t get involved. They don’t want to rock the boat. They don’t want the fallout.

And, I get that. Often, I won’t publish these headliner stories because I don’t want the personal attacks, the grief, and the unsolicited visits and personal messages that say: “better watch yourself … stop being so negative … we know the car you drive … we know where you work … don’t paint our town to be like that.”

Yes, threats. They’re real and a danger to a free society. But, I’m sure they’ve always been there in our history.

Our town has A LOT of issues we are presently dealing with, and it’s important to be open and honest about what’s happening.

My suggestion is for the caring public to be more involved in civic events. Attend your school board meetings, city council workshops, and work with local non-profits. Listen to your children in school (they know the wrongs being committed). Listen to your friends and peers. Put those closest to you first. And, take time away from yourself and serve others. All these things will help make society a better place.

Camas, WA —  Members of 100 Women Who Care Clark County presented $3,100 to Friends of the Children – SW Washington (Friends) on Wednesday, November 16, 2022, at their fourth meeting of 2022, held at Salud! Wine Bar, Camas. Board member Todd Mitchell accepted the funds on behalf of the organization. The local giving circle selected Friends to receive their donations at the third meeting of the year, held on Wednesday, August 17, 2022 at Salud! 

100 Women member Laura Guerrieri nominated the organization at the August meeting. Camas Farmers Market and Girls on the Run were the other nonprofit nominees at that meeting. 

Todd Mitchell explained that Friends of the Children was started in Portland nearly 30 years ago and the Clark County chapter was established in 2019. 

“Our mission from the outset was to pair children who are at the intersection of poverty, family trauma and other challenges with a paid professional mentor to help them through life, from kindergarten through 12th grade. No matter what,” said Todd. 

The organization currently has 40 kindergarteners enrolled in their mentorship program in Clark County.

Founded in 2018, 100 Women Who Care Clark County is a giving circle that meets quarterly and has donated over $100,000 to local nonprofits since inception. Members who attend are eligible to nominate local nonprofits to be considered for the quarterly donation. Members commit to a $100 donation to the charity voted upon by the members at each meeting.

The next meeting will be held at Salud! Wine Bar, 224 NE 3rd Ave. Camas, on February 8, starting at 6 pm. There is an optional social hour before the meeting from 5 pm. All are welcome to attend these meetings, especially those looking to connect with other philanthropic women in our community. Future meetings will be held on May 10, August 9 and November 8, 2023.

Camas, WA —Following an extended nationwide search, the City of Camas announced that Doug Quinn will be Camas’ next City Administrator.

Quinn will assume the position effective Jan. 4, 2023.  However, Council will have a vote to confirm the appointment at the upcoming Dec. 5, City Council meeting.

Quinn was a member of the Administrator candidate pool from the second recruitment process. Following the most recent search, Camas Mayor Steve Hogan went back through the candidates and determined Quinn was the best fit for the City at this time.

“Doug is extremely well-known and respected in this community, but it’s his dedication to this City that really made him the clear choice,” said Hogan. “I think his familiarity with the City of Camas and his knowledge of the area will be extremely beneficial. And I’m excited to see what he can do for Camas!”

Quinn is a Camas resident and a former City of Camas employee.  He served as Public Works Director and City Engineer from 1990 to 2003, Planning Director and Assistant City Engineer from 1988 to 1990 and served as Interim City Administrator from 1998 to 1999. Most recently, Quinn has served as the Director of Water Services for Clark Public Utilities, working in this role since 2003.

In addition to numerous community service positions, Quinn has also served on the Camas School Board since 2005, and as Board President from 2009-2011 and 2017-2019. He has been a Board Member with the Downtown Camas Association since 2005. Quinn is a licensed professional engineer in Washington and Oregon.

Vancouver, WA — Approximately 4,000 mailed ballots countywide were rejected from last week’s election, the vast majority of which are due to signature matching issues, said the Clark County Elections Office Tuesday. Affected voters were mailed a letter explaining the resolution process.

Greg Kimsey, Clark County Auditor, issued this statement on Monday, which explains how to resolve these signature match problems:

“Voters who have had their ballot rejected due to their signature on their envelope not matching the signatures contained in their voter registration record or because the signature is missing from their ballot return envelope may resolve those issues up until 5 pm on Monday, November 28.

“Signature update forms are sent to all voters with rejected ballots with a letter explaining how they may resolve their signature issue so their ballot can be counted. The letter explains that voters have until 5 pm Monday, Nov. 28 to return the completed form, so their ballot may be counted.

“Elections’ staff understands candidate campaigns are contacting voters regarding rejected ballots. The Elections Office strongly encourages voters to only return their signature update forms directly to the Elections Office, by USPS, or via someone they know and trust. The forms must be received by 5 p.m. Monday, Nov. 28.

“Elections Office staff are not visiting voters at their residences or texting them. If a voter has provided the Elections Office their phone number on their ballot return envelope and have not returned their signature update form, they will be called within three business days before the Nov. 29 certification date to remind them to return their signature update or missing signature form. Phone numbers provided to the Elections Office are exempt from public disclosure and are not provided as part of any public records request.

“Voters may check their ballot status online at https://clark.wa.gov/elections/wheres-my-ballot/ballot-status-tool 

“After entering first and last name and date of birth they may select BALLOT STATUS to learn if their ballot has been accepted or rejected.”

His message concluded, stating that voters may contact the Elections Office at 564.397.2345 or [email protected] with questions regarding the status of their ballot or how to resolve signature issues.

Approximately 3,300 ballots have left to be counted from last week’s election.