Carolyn Long Campaign Announces Over $682,000 Total Raised in the Second Quarter of 2020

Vancouver, WA — Today, the Long for Congress campaign announced that its total raised during the second quarter of 2020 is $682,000 — bringing their total raised for this cycle to $2.29M — and that it has over $1.58M in cash on hand.

The campaign said this quarter their team was able to raise these funds from thousands of contributions — 91 percent of which were low-dollar contributions, and over 77 percent of which were local — reflecting what they say is “a strong, sustained grassroots support for Carolyn’s candidacy and her campaign to represent Southwest Washington in Congress.”

The Long for Congress campaign hasn’t taken any corporate PAC money. 

“This impressive fundraising quarter is another demonstration of the incredible grassroots support for Carolyn Long here in the district — and a testament to the fact that Southwest Washington is ready for new leadership,” said Abby Olmstead, Campaign Manager. “In these incredibly difficult times, folks in our communities recognize that we can’t go on with business-as-usual politics in DC. We need a leader who will put people first, fight to protect health care and lower the cost of prescription drugs, and ensure that our path to economic recovery prioritizes small business and working families. Carolyn is that leader — and together, we will build a better future for Southwest Washington.”

Congresswoman Jaime Herrera Beutler’s campaign team hasn’t released their second quarter campaign numbers yet.

Long will be conducting an interview with Lacamas Magazine next week. Stay tuned.

To learn more about the Long campaign, click here: https://electlong.com

To learn more about the Hererra campaign, click here: https://www.votejaime.com

OLYMPIA, WA — Governor Jay Inslee announced Tuesday that the current statewide pause on counties reopening will continue through July 28, possibly longer.

Today’s news comes as COVID-19 cases statewide continue to spike, and Inslee said that this time is a pivotal in determining what conditions will look like in September when students — at all levels — are expected to return to the classroom.

“We have to find somewhere to break that chain of looming disaster,” Inslee said.

Inslee also issued an advisory that Washingtonians shouldn’t be surprised if some pandemic restrictions are rolled back over the course of the pandemic. He said this may include things like indoor seating in businesses, but that will be determined in the upcoming days and weeks. New restrictions will also be determined by how many people wear face masks and practice physical distancing in public.

The governor also praised residents for adhering to the mandatory statewide order to wear face masks. He said today’s announcement is designed to keep the virus from spreading.

“We are not in as bad a state as others,” Inslee said, naming Arizona and Florida, that have been struggling in recent days to stop a massive virus case spike. “We can’t overstate how important this moment is in addressing the pandemic.”

The state’s mandatory face mask rule went into effect on June 26. Under the order, violators can be punished with misdemeanor criminal penalties and businesses are asked to refuse service to customers who are not in compliance with the order.

COVID-19
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Inslee said the face mask order is having a positive effect on fighting COVID-19.

“What we know is this effort is working,” Inslee said. “Washingtonians are masking up.”

Exemptions to the face mask order include:

  • People who can’t wear masks because of existing medical conditions.
  • Children 5 years old and younger.
  • People who are deaf or need to have their mouth uncovered in order to communicate.
  • When it is onerous to do so, including customers who are eating out at a restaurant.

“We have to look at where we’re going to be, not where we are,” the governor said.

Clark County Public Health issued the following update today:

“Since our last update on Friday morning, another 106 people have tested positive for COVID-19 and one person died – a man in his 60s with underlying health conditions. Over the weekend, we had an average of 35 new cases per day (Fri-Sun). To date, 1,272 Clark County residents have tested positive for COVID-19 and 33 people have died. Currently, 26 COVID-19 patients are hospitalized and seven persons under investigation (PUIs) for COVID-19 are hospitalized.”

According to Clark County Public Health, if you have symptoms of COVID-19, you should call your health care provider right away and request to be tested.

Early testing is critical to slowing the spread of COVID-19 in Clark County. Identifying cases early enables us to more quickly isolate those who are sick and quarantine their close contacts.

Most health clinics are offering COVID-19 testing now. People who are unable to access testing through their regular health care provider, those who do not have a health care provider or those who are uninsured can contact the following facilities to request testing:

  • Legacy GoHealth. Hazel Dell, 360.787.4151. Cascade Park, 360.787.4135.
  • Providence Walk-In Clinic, Battle Ground. 360.687.6650. •Rose Urgent Care and Family Practice, Vancouver. 360.952.4457. (drive up testing available)
  • Sea Mar Community Health Center, Battle Ground. Call 360.342.8060 to schedule an appointment. (drive up testing available). Testing hours: 8:30 am to noon Tuesdays, 1 to 4:30 pm Thursdays. •Sea Mar Community Health Center, East Vancouver. Call 360.726.6720 to schedule an appointment. (drive up testing available). Testing hours: 8:30 to 11:15 am Mondays, 1 to 4:15 pm Thursdays.
  • Sea Mar Community Health Center, Salmon Creek. Call 360.852.9070 to schedule an appointment. (drive up testing available). Testing hours: 1 to 5 pm Wednesdays, 9 am to noon Thursdays. •The Vancouver Clinic. Various locations. Call 360.882.2778 to schedule an appointment. (*These facilities are providing tests at no cost for those who are uninsured. Some may charge a fee for the office visit. Call the facility for more information.)
Inslee
www.electlarryhoff.com

Fern Prairie, WA — Lacamas Magazine and Clark County Today are hosting a LIVE GOP Gubernatorial Candidate Forum on Thursday, July 9 at 6:30 pm, which will be moderated by radio personality Scott Hogg.

The forum is organized by Clark County Republican Women and allows candidates the opportunity for opening and closing statements. Candidates will draw for order of opening and closing statements, and they will answer forum questions in alternating order. The moderator will allow 30 second rebuttals on a limited basis.

To view the LIVE GOP Candidate Forum feed, visit Lacamas Magazine on Facebook and join.

Here are the Forum topics:

  • Question 1: Tax policy/state budget
  • Question 2: Homeless crisis
  • Question 3: Transportation, transit vs. lane miles
  • Question 4: New bridges over Columbia River
  • Question 5: Legislative priorities
  • Question 6: Pandemic response
  • Question 7: Civil unrest
  • Two-minute closing statement by each candidate

Participating GOP Candidates

Loren Culp
As a U.S. Army Soldier, Loren honed his leadership skills in the Drill Sergeant School which he then used to help turn civilians into soldiers. He was the Honor Graduate for his class of Combat Engineers and an Honor Graduate of the Non Commissioned Officers Academy for Leadership. CulpForGovernor.com

Tim Eyman
A fearless, battle-tested fighter, Tim passed 11 initiatives, saving taxpayers $43 Billion. He’s a conservative who wins despite millions in Democrat attacks. In 20+ years as a policy reformer, he has demonstrated the persistence needed to solve Washington’s big problems. tim4gov.com

Phil Fortunato
Phil is currently the last Republican State Senator in King County and won reelection by almost 60%. He is a staunch supporter of the 2nd Amendment and has distinguished himself in the Senate with his “No Sanctuary for Criminals” legislation, Term Limits for Governor, and more. PhilForGov.org

Joshua Freed
Joshua’s experience as a leader in small business, local government, and helping those in need make him uniquely qualified to tackle the biggest challenges facing our state. He founded his real estate company with the vision of developing strong communities for families. FreedforGovernor.com

Raul Garcia
Dr. Garcia is a graduate from the New York College of Osteopathic Medicine, and has been in practice for over 21 years. Dr. Garcia considers himself to be a protector. His interest and willingness to protect doesn’t stop at his immediate family, as he has a great love for Washington state and the people who live here.
DrGarcia4Governor.com

Anton Sakharov
Anton came here because his parents believed this country is an ideal place to achieve their dreams and make sure their kids could achieve theirs. A country where laws are followed, bureaucracy is nonexistent, people are safe and prosperous, and a chance to live the dream. AntonSakharov.com

Martin Wheeler
Martin L. “Iceman” Wheeler will place the needs of the citizens of the State of Washington in front of the few. He has established transparency as a firefighter and as a way of life. Through his years of public service, he is dedicated to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness for all. WheelerForGov2020.com

Vancouver, WA — One year ago today, Carolyn Long announced that she was running for Congress in Washington’s 3rd Congressional district “to give Southwest Washington a strong voice in DC and a hard working, accountable, committed Representative here at home.”

Today, her campaign is looking back on a year on the ground, recognizing the grassroots support and enthusiasm they’ve seen across the district, and looking forward to the work ahead between now and election day.

“Together, we are determined to bring forth new leadership that will build a better future for Southwest Washington by putting working families and small businesses first,” the campaign said in a statement. “In the past year, the Carolyn Long campaign has seen incredible levels of grassroots support and enthusiasm from folks in every community in our district. Since launching the campaign, we have raised over $2.29M from over 20,000 grassroots contributions. Over 80% of these contributions were local and have come from over 8,000 individual contributors. We have not taken a dime of Corporate PAC money, and we never will. This powerful fundraising is critical to the campaign’s ability to operate and communicate with voters all across the district — and it is a demonstration of the strong grassroots support for new, better leadership in Congress.”

And, the campaign continues to adapt.

“We have also held events in many different formats — especially as we have adapted quickly in the face of the coronavirus crisis to continue speaking with folks throughout our communities and taking questions on the issues that matter most,” the campaign said.

Since July 8th, 2019, when Long hosted three massive launch rallies across the district, the campaign has hosted or attended:

  • Six Rallies
  • Nine Facebook Live Town Halls and Policy Roundtable Discussions
  • Twenty-nine Coffees and Cold Ones with Carolyn

“This campaign is built on incredible support from voters all over the 3rd District, the strong desire for new leadership that puts people first, and the unifying belief that together, we can and will build a better future for Southwest Washington,” said Abby Olmstead, Campaign Manager.

Long lost her first bid for Congress in 2018 against incumbent, Representative Jaime Herrera Beutler.

Olympia, WA — Governor Jay Inslee announced Friday the state’s phased reopening “Safe Start” proclamation is replacing the existing emergency “Stay Home, Stay Healthy” order, which is set to expire on May 31. 

The new order loosens several aspects of his shelter in place policy, which began in March, but it also asks Washingtonians to voluntarily wear face masks while at work, or in public settings.

During the presser Inslee said he is updating the metric of requiring there to be no more than 25 new cases per 100,000 residents in past 14 days, from 10 cases per 100,00 residents.

The new proclamation is likely to speed up efforts to reopen parts of Washington under the governor’s four-phase recovery plan. 

His new plan makes it easier for businesses in more populous counties to move phases, and to evaluate more on a county-by-county basis. No county is yet in Phase 3. Twenty-six counties are in Phase 2. Clark County’s application to move to Phase 2 is on pause, pending a full review of last week’s coronavirus outbreak at a fruit processing plant in Vancouver.

“This is a path that will have more businesses opening,” said Inslee. “It will mean more activities will be allowed, and more flexibility will be allowed for counties in a variety of phases.”

Inslee also encouraged all Washingtonians to wear face coverings in public.

“When we wear a face covering, I really think it’s an expression of love and affection,” he said. “It’s a badge of commitment, and it’s a critical tool in moving forward.”

Face masks
www.champpizza.com

As part of this plan, workers in Washington will have to wear facial coverings at their jobs, unless they don’t have in-person interactions. That part of the provision will take effect June 8.

Washington’s largest counties, facing higher COVID-19 infection rates have largely remained in Phase 1 of Inslee’s plan. Friday’s order should change that.

The guidance at work places is as follows:

  • Workers are required to wear face coverings.
  • Employers must provide face coverings.
  • Stores will encourage shoppers to wear face coverings by posting signs.

Dr. John Lynch, an infectious disease doctor from Harborview Medical Center, said: “This is just one of many things to help each other. A lot of people have minimal symptoms or don’t even know they’re sick, it’s like influenza. Putting on a mask is effective at capturing droplets.”

Lynch said face masks “are not a perfect tool” and added “if we wear this it shows we are supporting each other, and we know we can’t wear the masks all the time.”

Inslee likened this new approach to prevent the virus from coming back rapidly. 

“We’re getting out of the quarantine lifeboat,” Inslee said. “The science on the cloth mask is more conclusive that they (face coverings) do help.”

Inslee said the order does not require business owners to reject a customer who is not wearing a face mask.

Senator Ann Rivers, who represents Washington’s 18 legislative district, said: “By today’s guidelines set by Governor Inslee Clark County could open, but the official approval from the Secretary of Health Weisman to move to Phase 2 is still on pause. Now, with that said our Clark County Director of Health is really pushing Weisman to open as soon as possible.”

Effective today, Sandy Swimming Hole Park in Washougal is officially reopened. 

“It is critical to continue to comply with physical distancing protocols during the upcoming warm weather forecast and to be respectful of our neighbors,” said the city of Washougal in a statement. ”Please do not park vehicles in the surrounding neighborhoods to access this park. Parking is prohibited on Shephard Road and citations will be issued for noncompliance. Parking is available in the off-street parking lot.“

Park users are expected to follow physical-distancing and safety protocols including:

  • Do not use parks or trails if you are exhibiting symptoms.
  • Follow CDC’s guidance on personal hygiene prior to visiting parks or trails.
  • Share the trail and warn other trail users of your presence and as you pass.
  • Observe CDC’s minimum recommended physical distancing of six-feet from other persons not from your household at all times.
  • If you are not able to maintain physical-distancing guidelines while visiting a park, please go home and try to come again at another time.

As a reminder:

  • All City of Washougal parks, trails and open areas remain open.
  • All City of Washougal park restrooms will remain closed until further notice. We are working on enhanced sanitation protocols to allow us to re-open the restrooms.
  • All play structures remain closed until further notice.
  • Steamboat Landing Dock remains closed until further notice.

For the latest updates on the City of Washougal’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic, please visit cityofwashougal.us/COVID19.

Washougal
https://www.lesschwab.com/store/?storeId=714

Dr. Jeff Snell, Superintendent of Camas School District, recently answered several questions about that state of the district as it navigates this COVID-19 pandemic.

How has this transition from in-school to at-home learning been going?

Overall, I think we’re happy about the transition. We just had a two-day window to convert. We are learning a lot. Each teacher has learned a lot. It’s a work in progress.

Some things are working well, some are not.

You have to try and take risks to get to success. I’m glad that families and students are taking risks. The class meetings have been successful, and it’s good to see each other’s faces. The ability to record lessons and drive home key concepts is what we’re excited about. We are working toward personalizing things for students. 

For example, if a teacher is doing a math lesson and there’s a key concept about finding the Y intercept of the line that teacher can make mini-videos about how to do that. Students will then be able to go back and learn. During the school year, it’s hard to find the time to do that. This has created a pause to help make different building blocks to help them learn. They are thinking differently.

I think every teacher is working harder than they’ve ever been. You take a job you’ve done for 20 years and everything is flipped upside down.

What’s the status of Food Services? Are we meeting the need? 

We have a couple of separate programs going on.  One is our food services program through our schools.  They are serving breakfast and lunch to students through pick up locations.  The number of students we’re serving has grown each week as we find new families.  We have about 10 bus routes that deliver meals and our food service staff prepares those meals.  We have been averaging over 5500 meals a week and will top the 50,000 meal mark on Monday. 

We also have a food bank type of program going on at the Jack, Will, and Rob center.  Our community has stepped up and been so generous with their donations. Our current inventory is good, and the needs continue to grow.  We’ve receive money donations and have about 10-12 volunteer shoppers that go out and purchase items to keep the inventory up to date. 

What’s happening with graduation?

We are delivering a virtual graduation for June 12-13 for both high schools. We’ve been making a lot of other plans with students and parents, and we are trying to be creative by meeting those needs. Phase two gives us a little more flexibility. Depending on whatever phase we’re in we’re hoping to be able to scale up the activities.  Many have shared how important it is to them to walk across a stage and receive their diploma so we’re looking at a date in early August to hopefully be able to do that. We are also targeting Homecoming in the Fall to start some new traditions like a grad walk before a football game. We are trying to have multiple dates and opportunities so we can try to meet the needs of graduates and their families.

How has the pandemic affected the Camas School District budget?

We engage with our local elected officials and we’re on weekly webinars with the state superintendent, and from what they’re saying the budget deficit continues to grow. I think the next three to four years could be very difficult. Public education is more than half of the state budget. We’re at the mercy of enrollment and the state budget.  There could be a special session this year, and there will likely be an impact in the coming school years so it’s important for us to be thoughtful about our spending now and how we save for the future too.

I think everyone is a little worried about what the future holds. We try to do the best we can given the budgets we’ve been given. We want to maintain the staffing levels going into next year, because of the need of students.  It is likely that we will need to help catch students up a bit, and we’ll need each of our staff to do that, so our plan for next year’s budget is to really maintain our staffing levels.  The 2021 legislative session will be the first year of the biennium with new budgets that most likely will be impacted by the pandemic, so we could definitely have to address reductions at the state level in planning for the 2021-22 school year. 

What will Camas schools look like this Fall?

The state has set up a task force to address that and what they’ve been looking at is a range of seven models. They look at all spectrums from where we are now, and what it might look like in late August. They have told us in June we will get some guidelines from them, so we’re looking at these issues with leadership and staff. We will be having a Town Hall on June 4 to share some of our planning work and listen to ideas and concerns from the community.  We want to be thoughtful about planning for the future, recognizing how significant the events this spring have been for everyone.

What about mental health and supporting parents with at-home learning?

This is a really important focus for us.  We started off communicating with families a lot about the logistical what and now  we’re shifting to tips for conversations with students and more the how.  We’re learning a lot about what’s working and what’s not and we want to share that information. 

Regarding students in crisis: We ask teachers to reach out to each student and monitor how they’re doing.  If we don’t hear from them we’ve been trying do the phone call or even go and knock on doors to make sure everything is OK. Everything is amplified in the home.  It’s hard right now as parents are trying to figure out work, the future and help their students.  We are trying to pay attention to that. I feel like right now it’s pretty similar to what we were experiencing before. If it was on the radar before, it’s on the radar now. When you physically see students in the classroom you had a sense of the situation, but not virtually we don’t have that so we have to really pay attention to students who may be in need. 

We have a great staff; they’re working really hard. It’s been very challenging for everyone. We have the opportunity to re-invent. You see some kids flourishing in these challenging times. We will come through this as a better school district.

Snell is going on his fourth year as Superintendent of Camas Schools. To learn more what is happening in Camas schools, visit www.camas.wednet.edu

Vancouver — Last week, Clark County submitted an application to be approved to move into Phase 2 of Governor Jay Inslee’s recovery plan. An outbreak at a local fruit processing plant put that application on hold, and local health officials continue to investigate the situation, and are actively working to keep the community safe through contact tracing and other methods.

Dr. Alan Melnick, the Clark County Health Director, and the Clark Regional Emergency Operations Center, continue to provide updates. Here’s a look at the Clark County numbers.

  • Number of positive tests: 510
  • Number of deaths: 25
  • Number of people tested: 8,834
  • Number of contacts on monitoring: 230
  • Male deaths: 16
  • Female deaths: 9
  • Deaths aged 80+: 17
  • Deaths aged 70-79: 5
  • Deaths aged 60-69: 2
  • Deaths aged 40-49: 1
  • Long-term care facility associated deaths: 16
  • Donated N95 masks: 5,124
  • Donated surgical masks: 3,124
  • Donated masks (other): 10,147
  • Donated gloves: 102,235

Statewide Numbers

  • Number of individuals tested: 330,598
  • Number of positive tests: 20,065
  • Number of hospitalizations: 3,290
  • Number of deaths: 1,070
Coronavirus
www.lilyatelier.com

Law Enforcement

Crime data updates from Clark County Sheriff’s Office for Week 20 includes the following:

  • Harassment Calls fell for the first time in four weeks of unusually high call numbers, but still remains slightly higher than normal.
  • Brandishing Calls (knives and other weapons) are again much higher than usual for this time of year.
  • Restraining Orders remain higher than normal and are typical, where offenders are attempting to contact victims who have a legal right to be left alone.
  • Auto Prowl calls are again on the higher slide of normal, but only about half of the calls are resulting in actual police reports. Citizens are opting to fill out online reports but aren’t following through.

Clark County Traffic Data

Clark County
2019 vs. 2020

What came about as an idea to expand their business, Arktana is bringing product to the people— quarantine style.

“We’ve worked through this pandemic as best we can but we needed to do something different before we get to Phase 2,” said Ann Matthews, owner of Arktana.

So, what is it?

The party requires an enthusiastic leader who lets Arktana deliver their products to their driveway or backyard.

Once the store’s live event begins, these quarantine pods can touch and feel product while team Arktana livestreams the event at their store.

“It gives our customers the opportunity to touch and feel product during the live feed and order on the spot through the website: www.arktana.com and if the item happens to be on the rack at that time they can take it home.”

It’s an idea that is starting off with a bang. The next watch party is scheduled for Friday at 5:30.

Tune in a their Facebook page to watch!

If you’d like to host your own watch party, contact Ann at [email protected]