For First Friday, May 3rd, we will have a “Garden Gnome & Fairy Gala” in honor of the Camas Plant & Garden Fair the next week! 5-8pm with so much going on!

Find those mischievous gnomes and cute fairies in each participating location and see what kind of fun each is having! You’ll earn tickets to win great prizes for each location you go to!

Other activities will include:

  • Find the fairy houses through town and feed the fairies! (get the fairy food at the DCA tables in Journey! :))
  • Find the Toadstool Game sponsored by Carla Edwards, Realtor! Mini toadstools will be posted around town.  Find up to 5 and get free raffle tickets to win the Garden gnome and Fairy-inspired baskets donated by Carla Edwards. So much FUN!!
  • S’MORES with IQ Credit Union
  • Mini-pots are coming this First Friday (May 3rd) to downtown Camas businesses compliments of Norris Arts. So far, (in semi-geographic order) Hidden River Roasters, Natalia’s Cafe, Arktana, Attic Gallery, Caps ’n Taps, GOW, Lily Atelier, Nuestra Mesa, The Artful Attic, One Beer at a Time, Mill City Brew Werks, Cafe Piccolo, Camas Gallery and the Soap Chest have all agreed to hide some pots. Each will have a $5 coupon for classes or retail items at Norris Arts studio AND you get to keep the mini-pot!
  • Free May Day Baskets from Camas United Methodist Church!
  • Art gallery shows and receptions with refreshments:Attic Gallery: 421 NE Cedar St.
    Camas Gallery: 408 NE 4th Ave.
    Second Story Gallery: 625 NE 4th (upstairs library)
    Free gnome and fairy airbrush face painting by Mandi Straub and Ian Needham of mandi MOON Artistry in front of Journey. They’ll be dressed as garden gnomes for photo ops as well.
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  • Have a talent? Come share at Journey’s very first “Open Mic Night” during First Friday. Sing a song. Play guitar. Do a comedy skit or stand up. Doors open at 5:30pm, performances between 6 – 8pm.  Performers will be scheduled on a first-come, first-served basis.  Signups begin when doors open at 5:30pm.  This is a family-friendly event – kids/youth welcome to participate!
  • Three ribbon cuttings:
    • Coventry Gardens of London, 602 NE 3rd Ave. at 5pm – Coventry Gardens will have a drawing for a floral bouquet and a British Tea Basket, too!
    • Envyago, 602 NE 3rd Ave. at 5pm
    • Fuse at Flow Hot Yoga (Cycle and Barre), 321 NE 4th Ave @ 5:30pm
  • Gnome and fairy kids’ crafts, games and fun at the DCA tables in Journey
  • Painting with the Paint Roller in front of Journey!
  • After Hours Shopping–get a ticket to win for every $10 spent in downtown!
  • Much more!

Join us! Start at Journey, 304 NE 4th, and pick up your passport and activity list. May 4th, 5-8pm. Let’s have fun together in our downtown!

Washougal, WA — Washougal area artists are once again opening their studio doors to offer a fascinating and art-filled family outing for Mother’s Day weekend.  The 2019 Washougal Studio Artists Tour, to be held May 11-12 from 10 am to 5 pm, will include 11 stops and features 19 local artists representing a vast array of creative works and mediums.

“We were delighted with the success of our first tour last year,” said Angela Ridgway, mixed media metal artist and event coordinator. “We received great interest and support from the local community and welcomed many visitors from the Portland area and beyond.  Some on the tour were discovering Washougal for the first time.”

The Washougal area has long been a hidden wealth of high-quality professional artists.

“I was thrilled last year that so many artists wanted to participate in the tour,” Ridgway said.  “Being invited into an artist’s studio is a wonderful way for the public to see where the magic of creating art happens and learn about both the art and the artists.”

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The tour route, which winds along the scenic Washougal River and through the Washougal foothills, is nearly as beautiful as the art found in the studios. 

“We heard many compliments from visitors last year on how scenic the tour drive was,” said Ridgway.  “Washougal is such a beautiful place that it is no wonder it attracts and inspires so many talented artists.” 

Adding to the tour experience, many artists will be conducting demonstrations of their artistic process.  A list of participants and a schedule is located on the event website at www.WashougalStudioArtists.org

Featured tour artists are: Angela Ridgway, mixed media metal; Anna Norris, oils and acrylics; Anna Wiancko-Chasman, clay/mixed media; Anni Furniss, acrylic painting; Char McHugh, ceramics; Charlene Hale, glass, ceramic, pen  and ink; Chris Brodigan, functional ceramic art; Cyndee Starr, mixed media; Deborah Roberts, watercolor, colored pencils, pastels; John Furniss, woodworking; Kathy Beckman, acrylic and multimedia on canvas; Kathy Marty, handwoven eco-friendly rugs; Katy Fenley, sterling silver, glass, and gemstone jewelry; Sharon L Ballard, acrylic paintings; Shirley Bishop, fused glass; Suzanne Grover, pastels, watercolor, mixed media; Tamara Dinius, mixed media; Toni McCarthy, original beaded jewelry; Tracy Simpson, encaustic, oil, jewelry.

Preview their work and see the tour map on the Washougal Studio Artists website.   You may also follow them on Facebook and Instagram.  Participating artists will also have copies of the map available, as well as many local businesses.

Washougal Studio Artists Tour is sponsored in part by the City of Washougal hotel/motel tourism tax fund.

Artist
Artist Shirley Bishop.
Artist
Artist Ani Furniss.

Washougal, WA — Art can tell a story.  It can inspire, move or add beauty and interest to a place.  The new metal sculpture panels installed on the wall of the shared courtyard at Jemtegaard Middle School and Columbia River Gorge Elementary School provide all of that and more.  The piece features beautiful and whimsical details cut as silhouettes into three stainless steel panels to tell stories of the Washougal area and Columbia River Gorge.

“Roots and Wings” was created by New York artist and a native of France, Béatrice Coron, through grant funding from the Washington Arts Commission.  “Whenever Washington State funds new construction, by law, half-of-one-percent of funding is set aside for the commissioning of new artwork,” said Marissa Laubscher, Washington State Arts Commission Art in Public Places Project Manager. “Washougal School District applied to ArtsWA for the funded art project through a competitive pooling process. They were awarded a $60,000 project. This budget covered all of the costs associated with the artist selection, design, engineering, fabrication, transportation, and installation of the artwork.”

Coron was on-hand to oversee the installation on March 12 and then spoke to students from both schools in assemblies the next morning. Using a Powerpoint presentation, she described her creative process and the inspiration behind her work on this piece. 

First, she explained the name, “Roots and Wings.”  

“You are so lucky to have your roots in such a beautiful place to enjoy, experience and explore,” said Coron. “And your education at school is what will give you wings.  They will take you wherever you want to go.”

“When I was awarded this work, the first thing I did was research,” she explained. “I visited and spent two days looking around the area for ideas and inspiration.  They were beautiful, warm, blue-sky days.  I took many pictures of all the sites and was amazed by the natural beauty here.” 

ArtsWA
Artist Beatrice Coron.

She told of traveling to area vistas to experience the incredible views of mountains and the river. 

“I climbed Beacon Rock,” she said. “I looked at your trees and animal life and saw all the outdoor activities you enjoy such as camping, skiing, fishing, motocross, horseback riding and hiking. I visited the petroglyphs tunnel downtown and learned about local history including Native Americans, Lewis and Clark, steam boats and farming.  There are so many stories tell.” 

Coron created sketches from her photos and the stories began to emerge, and she challenged students to take the time to study each unique panel.

“Find stories so you can tell others what you see,” she said. “And be sure to ask them what stories they see.”  She was sure to include images of both huskies and otters, the schools’ mascots.  You must look closely to find the sasquatch and a Corgi.  

The piece also features several silhouetted images of young people curled up reading books.

“It is like you begin as a worm and then a cocoon,” she said.  “From this reading and education, you will get your wings.” 

Mounted just outside the main panels, as if escaping, are children with butterfly wings. 

“Your wings will take you far,” promised Coron. 

“Beatrice has captured the spirit of Washougal,” said David Cooke, JMS principal.  “When you look at her work you experience the story of how the local community, resources and natural beauty play a significant role in the positive development of our kids.”

“Washougal School District’s local art selection committee worked with ArtsWA to set the initial goals for this project, selected the artist, and worked with her to provide feedback and context as she designed this artwork,” said Laubscher. “They were looking for artwork that would represent the natural beauty of Washougal and the Columbia River Gorge and interconnectedness of nature, school, students, and the community.”  

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The committee members included Cooke; Tracey MacLachlan, CRGE principal; Dani Allen, JMS art teacher; Sarah Howe, CRGE Parent; Kori Kelly, Superintendent’s assistant; Stephanie McGarvie, art teacher; Joe Steinbrenner, WSD facilities director and Amy Switzer, CRGE music teacher.

“It was an absolute pleasure to work with Beatrice,” said MacLachlan.  “She had such a presence, as we met and got to work with her.  Her professionalism as an artist, and her knowledge for her craft was remarkable.  The attention to the details and the research she accomplished for the project were unprecedented.”

“Roots and Wings“ joins more than 4,600 artworks in the State Art Collection, which is located in more than 1,200 schools and state agencies across Washington State. Unlike art collections you might find in a museum, the State Art Collection is chosen by community representatives and is sited in places where people study, live, work, and play.

When Coron was asked by a student to name her favorite art creation, she admitted it was an impossible question to answer.  “So, I must say, my next one,” she said with a laugh.

A section of “Roots and Wings.”

About the Artist

After briefly studying art at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts of Lyon, and Mandarin Chinese at the Université of Lyon III, Coron experienced life with a series of odd jobs. She has been, among others, a shepherdess, truck driver, factory worker, cleaning lady and a New York City tour guide. Coron has lived in France (her native country), Egypt and Mexico for one year, each and China for two years. She moved to New York in 1985 where she reinvented herself as an artist.

Coron’s works includes illustration, book arts, fine art and public art. She cuts her characteristic silhouette designs in paper and Tyvek. She also creates works in stone, glass, metal, rubber, stained glass and digital media.

Her work has been purchased by major museum collections, such as the Metropolitan Museum, The Walker Art center and The Getty. Her public art can be seen in subways, airport and sports facilities among others.

You can visit her website at: http://beatricecoron.com/

Cut Stories Statement from Béatrice Coron

For the last 20 years, I have been exploring visual storytelling in artist books, paper cutting and public art. Collecting memories from individuals and communities, I stage narrative allegories in silhouette to create a dialogue with the viewer in playful fantasies.

These visual chronicles record archetypal stories that transcend time and space. My goal is to invite the public to pause and bring their own ideas finding personal interpretation to reclaim their imaginative powers.

My personal history fueled my curiosity for stories and questioned my perception of realities. I have been fascinated by the relation of people to their space and the sense of belonging. Using papercutting where everything is cut from a single piece of Tyvek, the profusion of individual stories makes a coherent whole world.

Written by Rene Carroll

ARTSWA
The art is on display at at CRGE/Jemptegaard MS courtyard.
ArtsWA
Beatrice Coron’s art work was installed at the CRGE/Jemptegaard courtyard.

Washougal, WA – Washougal School District and Washougal Arts and Culture Alliance have collaborated to shine a spotlight on student art throughout March, which is recognized nationally as Youth Art Month.

“The arts are an important element of our students’ education in Washougal,” said Mary Templeton, WSD Superintendent. “Student exposure and participation in both fine arts and performance arts are essential to educating the whole child.” Research indicates that high-quality art educational opportunities can improve critical-thinking skills and even help to foster important values such as empathy and acceptance.

Washougal Youth Arts Month is made possible through partnerships with area artists, Washougal Community Education, Washougal Public Library, Washougal Schools Foundation and more.  Students will have opportunities to make and display art throughout the events and activities planned all month long.   

WYAM will culminate with the Washougal Youth Arts Month Gallery, at Washougal Town Square in downtown Washougal, March 27-295pm to 7pm and Saturday, March 30 from 1pm to 5pm

“Washougal school district began offering fine art classes to all elementary students this school year and the students are excited to display their pieces for the community,” said Alice Yang, Cape Horn-Skye Art Teacher.  “The level of creativity shown by our youth is impressive!”  

The Washougal elementary classes join the robust fine and performance arts programs at the middle and high school levels.  The gallery will also include works by WHS Career and Technical Education students with photography, metal and wood pieces.  WHS Culinary Arts students will supply artistically created sugar cookies using cutter designs made with the school’s 3-D printer.  A variety of school band and choir concerts will be performed in March and a Drama Camp run by WHS drama students as a fundraiser is available to elementary students.

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Washougal Community Education is offering a variety of classes. 

“We are pleased to have some new art opportunities for our students, and parents, to explore their creative side,” said Kathy Douglas-Evans, Washougal Community Education.  The Paint Roller and Washougal glass artist, Shirley Bishop, stepped up to provide these new, creative classes for youth.  They include glass fusing, rock and face painting, and kids and family canvas painting.  Register on the Washougal Community Education webpage at www.washougal.k12.wa.us/wcer Pieces created in these classes will be on display at 54-40 Brewing and Washougal Coffee Company at the end of the March. 

As a part of WYAM, WACA is inviting all Washougal students to participate in a fun photography challenge.  “We’re asking them to grab their smartphone or digital camera and share through photography the beautiful public art in the City of Washougal,” said Susan Warford, WACA Board member.  “We want them to find unique angles, use interesting lighting, include family or friends, have fun and be creative!”  Images will be shared on the WACA website and FB pages.  For details and student release form go to http://washougalarts.org 

Other community partners are the Washougal Public library, offering a free live concert, chalk art, pottery and crafts and Washougal School of Music, who is hosting a community recital showcasing the talents of their students as well as those of local music teacher, Chuck Carpenter. 

Washougal Youth Arts Month will receive formal recognition from both the City of Washougal and Washougal School Board.  On February 25, Mayor Molly Coston will sign a proclamation declaring March Youth Arts Month in Washougal. The Washougal School Board of Directors will issue a resolution supporting Youth Arts Month on February 26 at their regularly scheduled meeting.  Youth Art Month started in 1961 when the Council for Art Education and National Art Education Association named March as Youth Art Month to recognize art education and the value of art to create a better quality of life for all people. 

For a full list of scheduled activities and events throughout the month of March, go to http://www.washougal.k12.wa.us/

Art
Working on projects.

New York Times Best-Selling book author, Kristina McMorris, will be meeting with the Salud Wine Co. Book Club Monday, February 25, from 7-8 pm to discuss her book, “Sold on a Monday,” and will be available for book signings. Everyone is welcome to attend, and encouraged to bring a friend.

Salud! Wine Co. is located in Downtown Camas on 224 NE 3rd Avenue.

About her book, Sold on a Monday

The sign is a last resort. It sits on a farmhouse porch in 1931, but could be found anywhere in an era of breadlines, bank runs, and broken dreams. It could have been written by any mother facing impossible choices.

For struggling reporter Ellis Reed, the gut-wrenching scene evokes memories of his family’s dark past. He snaps a photograph of the children, not meant for publication. But when it leads to his big break, the consequences are more devastating than he ever imagined.

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At the paper, Lillian Palmer is haunted by her role in all that happened. She is far too familiar with the heartbreak of children deemed unwanted. As the bonds of motherhood are tested, she and Ellis must decide how much they are willing to risk to mend a fractured family.

Inspired by an actual newspaper photograph that stunned the nation, Sold on a Monday is a powerful novel of love, redemption, and the unexpected paths that bring us home.

To learn more about the author, visit www.kristinamcmorris.com

Salud! Wine Company is a wine bar, event center, and wine storage business that offers memberships. They regularly host events with live music and offer a nice variety of small plates to accompany your event. To learn more, visit www.saludwine.com

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Camas, WA — In their ongoing effort to support local artists, Tyson and Lori Morris, owners of Artful Attic in Downtown Camas, are sponsoring a fun youth art contest.

The art contest will run now until February 5 when all submissions need to be delivered to Artful Attic, which is located at 217 NE 3rd Avenue, Camas, WA 98607.

Rules:

  • The art contest is open to all Camas youth ages 11-18.
  • Artwork needs to fit on 10×10 wood canvases, which will be donated by Artful Attic.
  • Each canvas may be picked up at the shop.
  • Any medium is acceptable (wood burning, painting, metal, etc.) as long as it fits on the canvas.
  • Theme is “what Camas means to you.”
  • All works should include #MyCamas.
  • All submissions must be returned to Artful Attic by Feb 5th.
  • Each winner will receive a $25 gift card to Artful Attic.

There will be six winners in total, and their names will be announced during the Feb 7th reception at 6 pm, which will be held at the boutique. Winners will have their art featured in the Artful Attic gallery during the month of February.

Artists may choose to sell their piece at Artful Attic for 30 percent commission fee.

To learn more, call 360.210.4927 or email: info@artfulatticboutique.com

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Camas, WA — Mixed Media Artist Heidi Jo Curley is celebrating the grand opening of her new studio this Friday at 5 pm in Downtown Camas. Her studio is located in the space above Arktana Shoes, at 417 NE 4th Avenue.

The new studio represents the success Curley has enjoyed as a relatively new professional artist.

Curley, who has been painting for eight years, didn’t have any formal training outside of taking local art classes, but after the sudden passing of her husband, Ed, in 2010, art became an outlet, a form of expression, and a source of healing.

“There’s no educational reasoning for my art,” said Curley. “It’s an expression of my feelings, and what I want to do. While renovating the Ferrell House after Ed died, I would go down to Caffe Piccolo every day, and I created a whole new set of friends. That’s when I considered doing art.”

Curley went to Italy in 2012 and that’s when she really started painting while being instructed by Camas artist Elida Field, and Father Bruno through the Art, Women and Wine Tour.

“When I went back, I realized I really needed to get into art,” said Curley. “Then, when my mom died, I remember asking ‘how do I go from here?’ So, I struggled for about a month, and then decided to get up. I did the Chair series because of my mom. I planted all my mom’s favorite flowers and they’re inspiring.”

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Fellow artists and critics encourage her to choose one style and stick with it, says the self-proclaimed Mixed Media Artist.

“I want to keep learning and growing,” she added. “In my art, I think of circles and people. I do a lot of studying of colors and textures. I use my fingers and hands anytime I can, and I don’t want to be pigeon-holed into doing a certain kind of art. I’ve dealt with so many emotions since those two passings.”

Her portfolio grows along with her fan base.

“Everyone loves Heidi, she’s kind to everybody, she’s as real as they get,” said Marquita Call, owner of Camas Gallery. “For such a relatively newcomer, she has a signature look. When when see her work, we know it’s Heidi’s. She’s become recognized through her art.”

As part of her signature look, Curley is known for her famous “Chair” series. So, why the chair?

“Gathering people around the table is really important for me,” said Curley. “I think the Chair series represents that there’s always a chair for you. At the holidays, if someone doesn’t have a place to go, we welcome them.”

To learn more, visit www.HeidiJoCurley.com

Curley

Heidi Jo Curley shows one of her pieces.

Washougal, WA — Art lovers and the entire community are invited to help welcome the newest piece of public art in Washougal.  “WATER,” created by Wendy Armstrong, will be celebrated at a dedication ceremony on Saturday, December 1 at 1 pm at the art’s location on the corner of Main and Pendleton Way in downtown Washougal. A reception will be held immediately following at Washougal Coffee Corner.  The event is hosted by Washougal Arts and Culture Alliance.

WATER is the final piece of the four-part ELEMENTS series of artwork (Earth, Wind, Water and Fire) created by artists of “Women Who Weld” for the Washougal Parks Board of Commissioners.  This piece was made possible through a generous donation from Kind Heart Free Spirit Foundation.

The ELEMENTS project began several years ago when Suzanne Grover and Janice Ferguson of the Parks Board approached Women Who Weld to create an art piece at Steamboat Landing Park.  Originally the plan was for each Element to sit atop the tall pilings of the Steamboat Landing Park dock, but after a flood occurred that would have placed the art located there in danger, it was decided that the Elements would be located around town; separated by distance but linked by a common theme.

EARTH was installed in September of 2013 at the entrance to the Pedestrian Tunnel under Hwy 14.  It was created by Sharon Warman and sponsored by Washougal resident and Park Board member, Shirley Scott. WIND, created by Kathy Willson, was funded by a collaboration of Washougal residents and the Dick Beaver family and was installed in Beaver Park in April 2015.  FIRE at Steamboat Landing was created by the husband and wife artist team, Jennifer Corio and Dave Frei in 2016.  Mayor Molly Coston sponsored the piece as a tribute to her late husband, Phil Harris, Executive Director of the Two Rivers Heritage Museum, in recognition of his love of the rich history of the local area.

After WATER, the next public art to be welcomed to Washougal is a mural to be placed on the outside wall of the public library once the area is prepared for display.  It celebrates Washougal’s Betsey Ough, also known as Princess White Wing, by Native American artist Toma Villa.

WACA is currently raising funds for a full-sized bronze bear sculpture from gorge artist Heather Soderberg.  For more information about WACA, how to become and member and their efforts to bring public art to Washougal visit their website at www.washougalarts.org

Water

“Water”

Camas, WA — Former Seahawks star running back Curt Warner and his wife, Ana, along with writer Dave Boling, are excited to officially release their new book, “The Warner Boys: Our Family’s Story of Autism and Hope,” this weekend.

Published by Little A, an imprint of Amazon Publishing, “The Warner Boys” is a raw, emotional depiction of the reality of dealing with twins with severe autism, and the closeted life that ensued.

Curt is a two-time All-American at Penn State, a 2009 College Football Hall of Fame inductee, and a former All-Pro running for the Seattle Seahawks and the Los Angeles Rams. A three-time Pro Bowler, Curt was inducted to the Seattle Seahawks Ring of Honor in 1994.

Ana has dedicated her life to the care of her family, and the study and treatment of autism spectrum disorder. Both have served as keynote speakers at the National Autism Conference at Penn State, and the Texas Autism Conference in San Antonio.

The couple were prominent figures in Seattle during the 1990s, and when they dropped from the public eye following Curt’s retirement, the reality of their situation was a closely guarded secret.

“When Austin and Christian were born, everything seemed normal,” said Ana, who was already the mother of 18 month-old Jonathon. “But as they got older, they were really hard to control, and were nothing like Jonathan. By age 2, we started noticing really odd behaviors. They were very hyper.”

Ana said they wrote the book in part to explain why the disappeared from people socially.

“We were forced to isolate ourselves for their safety,” said Ana. “We were in survival mode for a long time.”

Curt said the book is also a story of hope.

“We take them from diagnosis at age 5 and prior to that the issues we were dealing with, and where we are today,” he said. “It’s not a fix-it book, it’s a book that is testimony of what we’ve been dealing with for the last 23 years. We just happened to find the right channels from point A to point Z. We ended up speaking at a 2013 Autism conference at Penn State, and after that we realized we do have something to share with people who are going through this. We are able to help people, and to promote awareness because there are families dealing with the autism spectrum and still looking for answers. We can relate to families coping with this. Ultimately, you’re not alone when it comes to this.”

Autism

Their new book is available at www.Amazon.com

Ana explains the autism spectrum of 1-10, with 10 being severe.

“You have people who can go to college and be successful and you have the other end of the spectrum,” she said. “We are at the 7-8 of the spectrum. Our kids are probably in the more severe end of spectrum. They need 24-hour assistance.”

Like the book, during our interview the Warner’s were very raw and candid about their daily struggles. During the two-hour interview, Curt acknowledged the daily roller coaster ride.

”As fathers, we’re supposed to be solid, not show emotion, we have to be strong,” Curt said. “But, this thing is tough. It’s tougher than any football game, any strategy. It’s tougher than anything I’ve had to deal with. There are moments of sheer frustration, anger, pain, and moments of total gratitude and love. We love our children.”

Ana said she escapes through sleep, and they are currently going through times when they can’t take the boys out.

“Mentally, they’re at 5-6 years old,” said Ana. “It’s hard to manage because they’re men.”

The book addresses the physical activities they do, and what foods work best. The couple provides counsel to other families, and encourages families to never give up.

“Our advice would be to not give up on your child or your marriage,” said Ana. “Try not to isolate yourself (like we did) and ask for help. In the case of someone who had never encountered anyone with autism before, be kind, don’t judge, if possible try to help.”

You may purchase the book here: The Warner Boys

 

 

Camas, WA — Life is just beginning for the The Artful Attic, a new Downtown Camas artist cooperative full service boutique, but some of the treasures they’re selling have a long history.

Case in point: Co-owner Lori Lander proudly holds a hand-turned wood bowl by local artist Ron Wiltsey, who created it from a burl from a sweetgum tree that was planted at Esther Short Park in the 1890s. He works with wood only.

“I just love this piece,” said Lander who opened the boutique with her soon-to-be-husband, Tyson Morris, just a few weeks ago. “It tells a story. Our store has many sweet treasures like this.”

Located at 217 NE 3rd Avenue, Artful Attic sits across the street from Salud Wine, and is just a stone’s throw from the mill.

Lander says the store features 17 local artists, roughly 65 of the store’s inventory.

“We wanted a platform for all kinds of art,” said Lander. “Our goal is to feature 100 percent local art. We could easily handle 40.”

Valerie Eliason does all the grain designed for her decorative wall art, handcrafting the stencils and applying a resin with a nice think veneer.

Artful

Come see this bowl, made from an old tree at Vancouver’s Esther Short Park.

Laura Koppes does a lot mixed media paintings. Uta Zuendel creates bamboo art using thin shavings resulting in stunning wreaths, ornaments, and other decorative work.

Chris Brodigan handcrafts the pottery (matching cups, plates, oil containers, bowls, etc) for an elegant table setting. Kathy Marty weaves stunning rugs out of Pendleton scraps.

“It was a challenge to get artists on board without a storefront,” said Lander. “The concept from opening was six months. We opened October 20.”

Artful Attic also does laser engravings, which costs $1 per square inch, plus a $10 setup fee. They can do cork, wood, metal, plastic, and glass.

“I love to create, and didn’t want to sit at a cube anymore,” said Lander. “I’ve dreamed about being a small business owner since I was a kid. I’ve had many ideas I just wanted to do. Come visit us and support the local artists. Let’s celebrate them!”

To learn more, visit www.artfulatticboutique.com