Camas, WA — In their ongoing effort to support local artists, Tyson and Lori Morris, owners of Artful Attic in Downtown Camas, are sponsoring a fun youth art contest.

The art contest will run now until February 5 when all submissions need to be delivered to Artful Attic, which is located at 217 NE 3rd Avenue, Camas, WA 98607.

Rules:

  • The art contest is open to all Camas youth ages 11-18.
  • Artwork needs to fit on 10×10 wood canvases, which will be donated by Artful Attic.
  • Each canvas may be picked up at the shop.
  • Any medium is acceptable (wood burning, painting, metal, etc.) as long as it fits on the canvas.
  • Theme is “what Camas means to you.”
  • All works should include #MyCamas.
  • All submissions must be returned to Artful Attic by Feb 5th.
  • Each winner will receive a $25 gift card to Artful Attic.

There will be six winners in total, and their names will be announced during the Feb 7th reception at 6 pm, which will be held at the boutique. Winners will have their art featured in the Artful Attic gallery during the month of February.

Artists may choose to sell their piece at Artful Attic for 30 percent commission fee.

To learn more, call 360.210.4927 or email: info@artfulatticboutique.com

Shopper’s

Custom engravings are available at Artful Attic.

Camas, WA — Mixed Media Artist Heidi Jo Curley is celebrating the grand opening of her new studio this Friday at 5 pm in Downtown Camas. Her studio is located in the space above Arktana Shoes, at 417 NE 4th Avenue.

The new studio represents the success Curley has enjoyed as a relatively new professional artist.

Curley, who has been painting for eight years, didn’t have any formal training outside of taking local art classes, but after the sudden passing of her husband, Ed, in 2010, art became an outlet, a form of expression, and a source of healing.

“There’s no educational reasoning for my art,” said Curley. “It’s an expression of my feelings, and what I want to do. While renovating the Ferrell House after Ed died, I would go down to Caffe Piccolo every day, and I created a whole new set of friends. That’s when I considered doing art.”

Curley went to Italy in 2012 and that’s when she really started painting while being instructed by Camas artist Elida Field, and Father Bruno through the Art, Women and Wine Tour.

“When I went back, I realized I really needed to get into art,” said Curley. “Then, when my mom died, I remember asking ‘how do I go from here?’ So, I struggled for about a month, and then decided to get up. I did the Chair series because of my mom. I planted all my mom’s favorite flowers and they’re inspiring.”

Main Street

Call 360.696.9877

Fellow artists and critics encourage her to choose one style and stick with it, says the self-proclaimed Mixed Media Artist.

“I want to keep learning and growing,” she added. “In my art, I think of circles and people. I do a lot of studying of colors and textures. I use my fingers and hands anytime I can, and I don’t want to be pigeon-holed into doing a certain kind of art. I’ve dealt with so many emotions since those two passings.”

Her portfolio grows along with her fan base.

“Everyone loves Heidi, she’s kind to everybody, she’s as real as they get,” said Marquita Call, owner of Camas Gallery. “For such a relatively newcomer, she has a signature look. When when see her work, we know it’s Heidi’s. She’s become recognized through her art.”

As part of her signature look, Curley is known for her famous “Chair” series. So, why the chair?

“Gathering people around the table is really important for me,” said Curley. “I think the Chair series represents that there’s always a chair for you. At the holidays, if someone doesn’t have a place to go, we welcome them.”

To learn more, visit www.HeidiJoCurley.com

Curley

Heidi Jo Curley shows one of her pieces.

Washougal, WA — Art lovers and the entire community are invited to help welcome the newest piece of public art in Washougal.  “WATER,” created by Wendy Armstrong, will be celebrated at a dedication ceremony on Saturday, December 1 at 1 pm at the art’s location on the corner of Main and Pendleton Way in downtown Washougal. A reception will be held immediately following at Washougal Coffee Corner.  The event is hosted by Washougal Arts and Culture Alliance.

WATER is the final piece of the four-part ELEMENTS series of artwork (Earth, Wind, Water and Fire) created by artists of “Women Who Weld” for the Washougal Parks Board of Commissioners.  This piece was made possible through a generous donation from Kind Heart Free Spirit Foundation.

The ELEMENTS project began several years ago when Suzanne Grover and Janice Ferguson of the Parks Board approached Women Who Weld to create an art piece at Steamboat Landing Park.  Originally the plan was for each Element to sit atop the tall pilings of the Steamboat Landing Park dock, but after a flood occurred that would have placed the art located there in danger, it was decided that the Elements would be located around town; separated by distance but linked by a common theme.

EARTH was installed in September of 2013 at the entrance to the Pedestrian Tunnel under Hwy 14.  It was created by Sharon Warman and sponsored by Washougal resident and Park Board member, Shirley Scott. WIND, created by Kathy Willson, was funded by a collaboration of Washougal residents and the Dick Beaver family and was installed in Beaver Park in April 2015.  FIRE at Steamboat Landing was created by the husband and wife artist team, Jennifer Corio and Dave Frei in 2016.  Mayor Molly Coston sponsored the piece as a tribute to her late husband, Phil Harris, Executive Director of the Two Rivers Heritage Museum, in recognition of his love of the rich history of the local area.

After WATER, the next public art to be welcomed to Washougal is a mural to be placed on the outside wall of the public library once the area is prepared for display.  It celebrates Washougal’s Betsey Ough, also known as Princess White Wing, by Native American artist Toma Villa.

WACA is currently raising funds for a full-sized bronze bear sculpture from gorge artist Heather Soderberg.  For more information about WACA, how to become and member and their efforts to bring public art to Washougal visit their website at www.washougalarts.org

Water

“Water”

Camas, WA — Former Seahawks star running back Curt Warner and his wife, Ana, along with writer Dave Boling, are excited to officially release their new book, “The Warner Boys: Our Family’s Story of Autism and Hope,” this weekend.

Published by Little A, an imprint of Amazon Publishing, “The Warner Boys” is a raw, emotional depiction of the reality of dealing with twins with severe autism, and the closeted life that ensued.

Curt is a two-time All-American at Penn State, a 2009 College Football Hall of Fame inductee, and a former All-Pro running for the Seattle Seahawks and the Los Angeles Rams. A three-time Pro Bowler, Curt was inducted to the Seattle Seahawks Ring of Honor in 1994.

Ana has dedicated her life to the care of her family, and the study and treatment of autism spectrum disorder. Both have served as keynote speakers at the National Autism Conference at Penn State, and the Texas Autism Conference in San Antonio.

The couple were prominent figures in Seattle during the 1990s, and when they dropped from the public eye following Curt’s retirement, the reality of their situation was a closely guarded secret.

“When Austin and Christian were born, everything seemed normal,” said Ana, who was already the mother of 18 month-old Jonathon. “But as they got older, they were really hard to control, and were nothing like Jonathan. By age 2, we started noticing really odd behaviors. They were very hyper.”

Ana said they wrote the book in part to explain why the disappeared from people socially.

“We were forced to isolate ourselves for their safety,” said Ana. “We were in survival mode for a long time.”

Curt said the book is also a story of hope.

“We take them from diagnosis at age 5 and prior to that the issues we were dealing with, and where we are today,” he said. “It’s not a fix-it book, it’s a book that is testimony of what we’ve been dealing with for the last 23 years. We just happened to find the right channels from point A to point Z. We ended up speaking at a 2013 Autism conference at Penn State, and after that we realized we do have something to share with people who are going through this. We are able to help people, and to promote awareness because there are families dealing with the autism spectrum and still looking for answers. We can relate to families coping with this. Ultimately, you’re not alone when it comes to this.”

Autism

Their new book is available at www.Amazon.com

Ana explains the autism spectrum of 1-10, with 10 being severe.

“You have people who can go to college and be successful and you have the other end of the spectrum,” she said. “We are at the 7-8 of the spectrum. Our kids are probably in the more severe end of spectrum. They need 24-hour assistance.”

Like the book, during our interview the Warner’s were very raw and candid about their daily struggles. During the two-hour interview, Curt acknowledged the daily roller coaster ride.

”As fathers, we’re supposed to be solid, not show emotion, we have to be strong,” Curt said. “But, this thing is tough. It’s tougher than any football game, any strategy. It’s tougher than anything I’ve had to deal with. There are moments of sheer frustration, anger, pain, and moments of total gratitude and love. We love our children.”

Ana said she escapes through sleep, and they are currently going through times when they can’t take the boys out.

“Mentally, they’re at 5-6 years old,” said Ana. “It’s hard to manage because they’re men.”

The book addresses the physical activities they do, and what foods work best. The couple provides counsel to other families, and encourages families to never give up.

“Our advice would be to not give up on your child or your marriage,” said Ana. “Try not to isolate yourself (like we did) and ask for help. In the case of someone who had never encountered anyone with autism before, be kind, don’t judge, if possible try to help.”

You may purchase the book here: The Warner Boys

 

 

Camas, WA — Life is just beginning for the The Artful Attic, a new Downtown Camas artist cooperative full service boutique, but some of the treasures they’re selling have a long history.

Case in point: Co-owner Lori Lander proudly holds a hand-turned wood bowl by local artist Ron Wiltsey, who created it from a burl from a sweetgum tree that was planted at Esther Short Park in the 1890s. He works with wood only.

“I just love this piece,” said Lander who opened the boutique with her soon-to-be-husband, Tyson Morris, just a few weeks ago. “It tells a story. Our store has many sweet treasures like this.”

Located at 217 NE 3rd Avenue, Artful Attic sits across the street from Salud Wine, and is just a stone’s throw from the mill.

Lander says the store features 17 local artists, roughly 65 of the store’s inventory.

“We wanted a platform for all kinds of art,” said Lander. “Our goal is to feature 100 percent local art. We could easily handle 40.”

Valerie Eliason does all the grain designed for her decorative wall art, handcrafting the stencils and applying a resin with a nice think veneer.

Artful

Come see this bowl, made from an old tree at Vancouver’s Esther Short Park.

Laura Koppes does a lot mixed media paintings. Uta Zuendel creates bamboo art using thin shavings resulting in stunning wreaths, ornaments, and other decorative work.

Chris Brodigan handcrafts the pottery (matching cups, plates, oil containers, bowls, etc) for an elegant table setting. Kathy Marty weaves stunning rugs out of Pendleton scraps.

“It was a challenge to get artists on board without a storefront,” said Lander. “The concept from opening was six months. We opened October 20.”

Artful Attic also does laser engravings, which costs $1 per square inch, plus a $10 setup fee. They can do cork, wood, metal, plastic, and glass.

“I love to create, and didn’t want to sit at a cube anymore,” said Lander. “I’ve dreamed about being a small business owner since I was a kid. I’ve had many ideas I just wanted to do. Come visit us and support the local artists. Let’s celebrate them!”

To learn more, visit www.artfulatticboutique.com

Book author Pat Jollota is at it again, with her just-released, well-researched, and riveting historical account of a murder case that rocked Vancouver in the 1950s. “The Murder of Joann Dewey in Vancouver Washington,” published by The History Press, is a decade in the making by Jollota, 81, a retired Vancouver City Councilwoman, museum curator, and the author of seven books.

Always a character and full of life, Jollota, walked us through the nuances of the case of 18-year-old Joann Dewey, whose Vancouver kidnapping in 1950 was on full display by upstanding citizens who did nothing while the young woman, who was just 60 feet from her destination, fought for her freedom.

It’s the story of a life cut short, the craziness of a criminal investigation that included the arrest of the investigating sheriff, and the ultimate convictions of two brothers, Turman Wilson, 26, and his brother Utah, 18. They would eventually hang for their crimes.

“The crime happened at 13th and D Street in Vancouver,” said Jollota. “On April 22, 1950, the victim, 18-year-old Joann Dewey, was just 60 feet away from St. Joe’s Hospital when she was grabbed by these two guys — in front of two upstanding citizens. She was fighting and screaming and they told her she was Utah’s wife and that she had too much to drink. It’s tragic.”

It’s a complicated case, said Jollota. The Sheriff had no police experience, and was tried for public intoxication. He had been the director of Labor and Industries for Washington. The prosecution was praised for its work, and the case even brought in Earl Stanley Gardner, author of all the “Perry Mason” books. Gardner wrote a report about the investigation, and he had nothing but praise for the Vancouver Chief of Police and veteran prosecutor, RD Jones.

“This whole crime is fascinating, and I was riveted by it,” said Jollota, who spent many years researching to write this book. “We’ve had pretty strange crimes around here.”

And, it gets weirder.

“At one of my book signings, the Wilson family came, and they stood right behind me,” said Jollota. “They believe their family was framed. So what I did, I gave them a little time to present what they believed, and then they were content. They bought two of the books. This was Saturday at Vintage Books. This whole case is weird, the trial is weird, the investigation is weird.

Jollota

“The Murder of JoAnn Dewey” is available at Barnes and Noble.

“If I had found one shred that pointed to their innocence I would have written it that way, but all I found was pointed to them. They had incorrigible evidence — a beer bottle with big bubbles in it, with fingerprints on it.”

And, she said it fits a pattern of criminal behavior.

“Ten years before three of the brothers were in an almost an identical crime, and they were sentenced to an Oregon penitentiary,” said Jollota. “The oldest brother was killed in World War II. The family had a history of crimes, including a pardon by Oregon Governor McCall for Rassie.”

Jollota did extensive research for the book. She started day by day in her role as Clark County Historical Museum curator, and found the stories in The Columbian archives. The more she dug, more facts emerged. It took her about a decade to do the research.

In February 2018, she was approached to write the book, which took three months to complete.

“I just focused on writing every day,” she said. “My challenge was to take all of these stories, the trial, the crime, the investigation and weave those together in a way that made sense. The trial was five weeks long, and trying to make sense of that was a challenge. I asked Judge Suzanne Clark to read it, and she did. She just changed some of the phrases that a judge would use. She was kind enough to do it for me.”

Jollota also wants people to remember JoAnn.

“She never had a chance at love, at getting married, at raising a family, or starting a career,” said Jollota. “I want people to remember her.”

The book is available at Vintage Books, Barnes and Noble, Philbin’s Hardware, and, of course, www.Amazon.com

On November 24, Jollota is going back to Vintage Books for Small Business Night.

The book was released on October 29.

Washougal, WA — This charming stage musical is an adaptation of the classic Charles Dickens tale, “A Christmas Carol.” Scrooge tells the timeless story of the quintessential miser, Ebenezer Scrooge, as he’s visited one Christmas Eve by the Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present and Yet-To-Come. They lead him through a fanciful journey as he comes to terms with his miserly ways and has a change of heart.

Performances are November 30 – December 9, 2018 at Washburn Performing Arts Center at Washougal High School, 1201 39th Street, Washougal WA, 98671. Tickets are on sale now at journeytheater.org or by calling 360.750.8550. Pre-sale adult tickets are $12. Youth and senior tickets are $10. Our “family day” performance is December 1 at 7:00 pm with all tickets $10 in advance. Tickets for all performances are $4 more at the door.

Public Performances

Friday, November 30th – 7:00 pm
Saturday, December 1st – 7:00 pm
Sunday, December 2nd – 2:00 pm
Friday, December 7th – 7:00 pm
Saturday, December 8th – 2:00 pm
Saturday, December 8th – 7:00 pm
Sunday, December 9th – 2:00 pm

About Journey Theater Arts Group

Our mission: “Growing youth in character, confidence and creativity, in a Christ centered community.” Throughout the Portland/Vancouver area, Journey offers dozens of classes for ages 6-18, in drama, dance, voice and more. In addition, we produce 12 Broadway-style shows in four locations during the school year, improv competitions, multiple summer camps and professional-level community theater musicals for all ages in summer. Journey is a nonprofit educational organization, with offices located at 1400 NE 136th Ave, Suite 201, Vancouver WA, 98684. Contact at 360.750.8550 or www.journeytheater.org

Photo Gallery

Camas, WA — At Thursday’s Camas-Washougal Rotary Club meeting, member Tina Simmons announced she would be having a book signing for her book, “Zandreal.”

Wait, what?

Simmons, who works for a wine labeling company, and whose pen name is Tee Griffen, spent a year writing and editing “Zandreal,” and got it published in 2016.

“It’s really not a new book,” said Griffen. “But because of life issues, I had to delay its marketing, so we’re doing that now.”

“Zandreal” is young adult fantasy fiction about a young girl named Andrea and she finds out she’s not quite human. So, she must figure out why she’s here, and she ends up doing a lot of external travel,” said Griffen. “The book is about our responsibility to share our gifts with the world, taking care of the Earth, and working together.”

Griffen’s no stranger to writing, as she previously was the ghost writer for two books — the first was “Tracks: Memoirs of a Vietnam Veteran” by Clyde Hoch. The second one was a book called “Turbo Charge Your Life,” by Troy Spring. Those were written in 2011 and 2012.

“I’ve always liked to write, but being an author wasn’t my goal in life,” said Griffen. “I went to school for Graphic Design at Cazenovia College in upstate New York. ”I wrote this as part of self-exploration. I’m an observer, a healer, a worrier, a wanderer, and a seeker. All the elements were there. I couldn’t write it fast enough. Once those five parts came to me, they formed the characters and the storyline came together.”

Initially, she worked with a publisher, but it didn’t move fast enough for her, so Griffen chose the self-publishing route.

“It was hard to self-publish,” said Griffen. “I felt more out there on my own, because with the publishing house I felt I would have had more support. The Kickstarter campaign was set in 2016 and I raised $4,000. It wasn’t hard to get, but it took a lot of marketing. They told you to find champions ahead of time. They also supported me. I had a community. It was an emotional roller coaster because it feels like baring my soul to the world.”

Sunday’s book signing at Caffe Piccolo in Downtown Camas is the only book signing she has scheduled for now. She’s been talking to the school districts about getting into the classrooms.

“I think it’s time to get the book out there,” said Griffen. “I feel like our country is very polarized, and I think we could use a little bit of unity.”

The book is available at www.Amazon.com and you can learn more at www.teegriffen.com

 

Camas, WA — Imagination, determination, and overcoming adversity were the main topics addressed by 2008 Camas High School graduate, and new book author, LK Walsh, while addressing Liberty Middle School students Friday afternoon.

Her book, “The Lavender Soul,” released in April through PelianWords Publishing House, is a fantasy novel about a young girl born with lavender eyes, portending she will be the annihilation of evil, or the impetus of world-consuming darkness. It is an adventure through a fantastical world with reimagining of classical characters, such as fairies and dragons, along with new beasts crafted from Walsh’s imagination. It’s about the main character, Vera, who is seeking out her purpose.

Now living in Lompoc, CA, Walsh is in town for the Portland Book Festival, and was invited to spent time in her hometown.

“I’m here to talk about dreams and how you can help them come true,” said Walsh. “I was a senior, and had my life plan right on track, and I had already applied to several universities. I was set. I was ready to go to Chapman to study Music Therapy. Chapman said they were ending the program, and that affected my scholarship. I was high and dry, and my mother had to call and begged to get to other schools. I had worked for years to become a music therapist, so I decided to become a Humanities major and went to Concordia in Southern California.”

 

She appreciated the experience, and was able to explore many things.

“I went into journalism, but that wasn’t for me,” said Walsh. “Then I worked for an art newsletter. That wasn’t for me. So, I decided to get into publishing.”

After earning her Bachelor’s Degree in Humanities Creative Writing from Concordia in 2011, she spent 18 months writing “The Lavender Soul” after spending eight years imagining it. Once completed, she went through the agony of finding a publisher, and after 38 rejection letters, she found a home with PelianWords Publishing House.

“I am fully able to admit that I felt like a failure because it really hurts when people say no,” said Walsh. “But failure isn’t real. You can fail because you didn’t pass a test. If you choose not to learn from the failure, then it’s a real failure. You have to learn from it.”

She said there’s “one key to success in any field and that is imagination, which is key to making all of your dreams come true.”

She encouraged the middle schoolers to always have imagination.

Walsh

LK Walsh addresses students at LIberty Middle School in Camas.

“Logic, science and math are not separate from imaginations,” she said. “Sometimes people give up on their dreams because of money. Authors don’t make money. My dream is to create worlds. My dream is to spread imagination. Dreams have such great value because it takes courage to dream. Every time you have a thought it creates a physical pathway in your brain. The easiest thoughts are negative ones. It takes imagination to be positive. Imagination gives you the courage to dream. Dreams don’t always have to be those huge paychecks. They don’t even have to make sense.”

Walsh has spent the last several weeks traveling to promote her book, and is working on a prequel, which has been approved by her publishing house.

Cat Rushing, Walsh’s mother, created the cover illustration, based on vision provided by Walsh.

To learn more, or to purchase her book, visit www.lkwalshauthor.com

Washougal, WA — Second grade art students of Columbia River Gorge Elementary are already getting into the holiday spirit by created ornaments for Washington Governor, Jay Inslee’s Christmas Tree.

CRGE art teacher, Joanna Sickels, saw the opportunity and applied to have CRGE participate in the project. “It is important for students to share their work and have it seen by a wide audience,” she said.  “Projects that bring works out into the public like this help kids to invest in their art. This is also such a great opportunity to highlight our new art elementary program and let the state know that Washougal School District offers art instruction to all K-5 students.”

Since 2013, the Governor’s Mansion has requested ornaments made by students from around the state to decorate the mansion’s Christmas Tree.  The mansion receives a high number of visitors during the holiday season and guests greatly enjoy seeing the work of K-12 students from Washington State that decorates the tree.

“I’m delighted that Columbia River Gorge Elementary applied to participate and was selected,” said Anne Banks, Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) Learning and Teaching Program Supervisor.  “This year the theme is “Sea Creatures” and we are all looking forward to seeing the ornaments they are creating!”

Once Sickels learned the school was selected and the ornament theme, she emailed the staff to find out who was teaching about the ocean.  “That is a second-grade subject so second graders were selected to create fish, integrating the two subjects,” she said.  “I tell students that science and art are best friends, and math and art are best friend.  Integrating arts in classroom subjects can show students how art is connected in so many ways to what they are learning.”

For their project, Sickels chose traditional Japanese paper-folding to create an origami fish.  After folding the fish, students used decorative papers to collage and create attractive designs. “Origami is a beautiful medium,” she said. “The project allows them to use their personal creativity to make it their own unique fish ornament.”

According to Banks, the response this year was huge from classrooms across the state who wanted to participate, however, just twenty-two classrooms could be a part of the project. They were selected based on their art descriptions, ESD region, and whether they were an elementary, middle, or high school so that all regions and grade bands were represented in the statewide opportunity.