Washougal, WA — Wet and cold weather finds many of us indoors during the winter. The Camas-Washougal Historical Society is inviting groups searching for an interesting activity to step into history at the Two Rivers Heritage Museum in Washougal.

“Although we are currently closed to general admission for our annual winter maintenance and display work, we are happy to host groups of eight or more to enjoy our museum this time of year,” said Lois Cobb, CWHS Volunteer Coordinator.  A team of knowledgeable docents will help guide guests through the interesting displays which tell the stories of the history of Camas and Washougal.

Tours are available Monday through Saturday and need to be arranged by contacting Cobb at 360-835-5449.

Museum volunteers have been working hard during maintenance and COVID closures to refresh, update and expand existing displays and curate new historic information from the extensive artifact archives in storage. 

“Volunteers have taken a deeper look at our displays and created more detailed signage,” said Cobb.  “This adds to the enjoyment for guests as they understand more about the history and stories behind what they are seeing.”

A few of the interesting displays include Native American baskets and stone tools, mining relics, logging and dairy equipment, cobbler and carpenter tools, local doctor photos and their medical instruments, a pioneer kitchen with wood fire oven and ice box, military uniforms and toys that teach.

Another highlight is the new Gathering Place as Washuxwal, a long house inspired structure that was completed this fall.  The pavilion will be home to CWHS educational presentations and will help tell the stories of local Native Americans who were the first inhabitants of the area.  

Tour prices are $5 for adults, $4 for seniors and just $2 for students.  The museum will be open for general admission on Saturdays from 11am-3pm from March through the end of October. For more information about the museum and volunteer and membership opportunities, visit www.2rhm.com and follow them on Facebook.

“We are proud of our museum and the stories we tell there,” said Cobb. “We want our community and visitors to the area to enjoy it and come away with a new appreciation of those who came before us. The Two Rivers Heritage Museum is where history lives for Camas and Washougal.”

VANCOUVER, WA — The Clark College Concert Band under the direction of Dr. Doug Harris, presents its Fall Concert on Friday, December 3, 7:30 pm in the Durst Theater, VSAA, 3101 N Main St, Vancouver. Admission to the performance free and open to the public. Donations to the Clark College Music Department are welcome at the door. Masking, socially distanced seating, and contact tracing sign-in are required.

The concert features William Latham’s “Brighton Beach” concert march, Percy Grainger’s take on Handel, Aaron Copland’s “Down a Country Lane,” Frank Ticheli’s commissioned work “Cajun Folk Songs,” and Jan Van der Roost’s commission to honor the 110th anniversary of the Belgium Royal Saint Martinus Fanface Band.

“It is so fantastic to be back on campus creating music together,” says Dr. Harris. “We are looking forward to sharing our music with an audience in a few weeks.  We also invite college and community musicians to play with us in Winter and Spring quarters as we rebuild our band after four quarters off!”

For complete information about all the Clark College Music Department concerts including the orchestra, concert band, jazz band, and choirs, please see the full calendar.

About Doug Harris

Dr. Doug Harris joined the faculty in Fall 2018 year as Director of Bands at Clark College after serving as Assistant Director of Bands at Western Kentucky University, and Director of Bands at both Santa Clara University and Southern Utah University. He also enjoyed a long and distinguished career as a high school band director in Florida. 

Dr. Harris received his Bachelor of Music Education from the University of Florida, his Master of Arts and Doctor of Arts from the University of Northern Colorado.  His conducting teachers include Richard W. Bowles, Dr. Raymond Chobaz, Dr. German Gutierez, Dr. Richard Mayne and Dr. Kenneth Singleton, and has studied with Douglas Akey, Stanley Derusha, John Paynter and Frank Batiste.  At his most recent high school, Palm Bay High School in Melbourne, FL., his concert and jazz bands were recognized as being among the elite in the state, regularly receiving highest marks at district and state festivals.  The Wind Ensemble was invited to perform at the University of Florida Invitational Concert Band Festival as well as the prestigious Bands of America National Concert Band Festival in Indianapolis.  The top jazz band performed at, and won, jazz festivals in Florida, Georgia and Virginia, and has earned praise while performing with jazz notables such as Ira Sullivan, Bill Prince, Marc Dickman, Christian Tamburr, Maynard Ferguson, David Steinmeyer, Bobby Shew and Portland’s own Charlie Porter.

Clark College
Concert Band.

Washougal, WA — The sound of a steady drum beat and the singing of a blessing in Chinookan language filled the afternoon air at the dedication of the Gathering Place at Washuxwal pavilion held at its site at the Two Rivers Heritage Museum on Saturday, September 18. 

A small group of supporters and honored guests gathered to celebrate the project’s completion.  Four years ago, the Camas Washougal Historical Society (CWHS) Board of Directors decided to start an effort to recognize the contributions and tell the stories of the Native Americans who lived in this area of rushing waters. The Gathering Place at Washuxwal project was born. True to its name and intent, the Gathering Place will play host to a variety of interesting educational programs, as well as CWHS meetings and events.

The open pavilion design is inspired by traditional cedar plank houses used by local tribes living along the shores of the Columbia River.  It features Native-inspired wood carvings created by Adam McIsaac, project lead carver and advisor for the pavilion artwork, a respected expert in Native American art.

CWHS president, Jim Cobb, thanked supporters of the project at the event calling out three individuals for their significant roles. Michael Lewallen and Jason Ferrier of Lewallen Architects in Camas and Mark Albin of Able Hands Construction. 

“Without Michael’s help we could not have finished the project, or even got it started,” said Cobb.  “And Jason was our designer and architect and so much more. Mark was the one who set all of this up.  He cut the inserts, put in the posts, put on the roof, he is the one who literally screwed the place together.  Mark worked hard and I can honestly say I don’t know of anyone else who could have done it.”

The dedication highlight was the two blessings performed by Sam and Mildred Robinson.  Robinson, vice chairman of the Chinook Nation, told the group that long houses provided a lot for the people of this land.  

“You look around and notice one entrance,” he pointed out. “The step in would drop as much as three feet. People would ask how the elders got inside. Well, we would pack them. Our elders were very important to us. They carried our knowledge; they were like our libraries, so we took care of them at all times.”

Robinson went on to say that he refers to Chinook longhouses as the first colleges in the Pacific Northwest.  

“In these buildings is where people would sit in the winter by the fire and learn from their grandparents, their aunts and uncles. They would learn what it was like to be Chinook and how it was to be Chinook for tens of thousands of years on this Columbia River.”

As is the Chinook custom to give a gift to visitors, Cobb presented the Robinsons with Pendleton blankets from the CWHS.  

“We hope our relationship with the tribe can get solid and we can work together with educational programs and use this place to help bring back the local history and stories of the past,” Cobb said. 

The Two Rivers Heritage Museum is located at 1 Durgan Street in Washougal and open March through end of October on Saturdays from 11 am to 3 pm.  Admission costs are $5 for adults, $4 for seniors, $2 for students and free for children under 5 and all CWHS members.  Group tours are available any day of the week (by appointment only). Call Lois Cobb at 360-835-5449 for scheduling.

“We hope everyone will be interested in seeing this completed project and visit the museum before we are closed for winter maintenance starting in November,” said Cobb.  “Just because we have finished the plank house, doesn’t mean that we are done improving the Two Rivers Heritage Museum experience for the public and especially our local community.”

Rookie policewoman Valorie Dawes is smart, tough, and intuitive. But she’s learning on the job, and every mistake costs lives.

Camas, WA — Award-winning Camas author and playwright Gary Corbin has announced the release of his eighth novel, A Better Part of Valor, the third in his acclaimed Valerie Dawes Thrillers police procedurals series.

A Better Part of Valorwas released to all retailers, including local bookstores, and signed copies of the paperback are available to order on the author’s web page (www.garycorbinwriting.com).

About A Better Part of Valor

In this exciting, character-driven police procedural by acclaimed author Gary Corbin, rookie policewoman Valorie Dawes returns to hunt down a serial killer, who targets high school girls—and leaves them drowned, barefoot, and bearing the same strange, fresh “girl power” tattoo.

Val wrangles a coveted spot on a high-profile task force dedicated to finding the killer, nicknamed by a muckraking blogger as the “Shoeless Schoolgirl Slayer.”

But the killer is clever and elusive, and somehow has gained inside knowledge of the task force’s tactics and plans. Moreover, his targets, methods, and timing are shifting in unpredictable ways, putting those close to Val—and perhaps Val herself—in mortal danger.

How can Val stop the Shoeless Slayer before he strikes down another innocent victim?

“Because of the pandemic, I’ve decided not to hold a public event, like a book signing, for this release,” Corbin says. “But copies will be donated to the Camas library and will be available at local bookstores, as well as online.”

The book is available in paperback in both regular and large-print editions. “My own terrible eyesight prompted me to go with a large-print version,” he adds, laughing. “It started getting tough to read my own books!”

More information is available on the author’s website, garycorbinwriting.com. You may also purchase the paperback version here: https://www.amazon.com/Woman-Valor-Gary-Corbin/dp/0997496797/

What Early Reviewers are Saying about A Woman of Valor:

“A Better Part of Valor: another thrilling adventure. Gary Corbin’s witty and fast paced story is a must-read that will keep you hooked at every turn.”

Briar’s Reviews

“Exploring the gritty intersection between precinct politics and life on the streets, A Better Part of Valor is a powder keg of intrigue ready to explode. Valerie Dawes’ sharp mind and dogged persistence make her the ideal hero to root out the moral depravity at the city’s core. An exciting read that leaves me wondering what’s next.”

 Erick Mertz, author of The Strange Air series of paranormal mysteries

A Better Part of Valor’s intricate plot, likeable central character and sense of authenticity kept this reader turning the pages way past her bedtime.”

What Cathy Read Next

Other Books by Gary Corbin

Gary’s other published works include:

A Woman of Valor (2019): rookie policewoman Valorie Dawes has a mission: take serial child molesters like Richard Harkins off the streets of her small hometown of Clayton, CT–for good. But Valorie’s past includes childhood abuse trauma of her own, and her battle with this cunning, vicious criminal awakens memories and emotions she’d rather forget.

In Search of Valor (2020): In this prequel to A Woman of Valor, Valorie Dawes fights an international kidnapping syndicate on behalf of a new college friend–and harbors serious doubts about her future as a police officer.

Lying in Judgment (2016): A man serves on the jury of a murder trial – for the crime that he committed! Lying in Judgment was selected as “Book of the Week” on Bookworks.com July 11-17, 2016 and an “Indie Spotlight” featured novel on literarylightbox.com in Winter 2016-17.

Lying in Judgment (2016): A man serves on the jury of a murder trial – for the crime that he committed! Lying in Judgment was selected as “Book of the Week” on Bookworks.com July 11-17, 2016 and an “Indie Spotlight” featured novel on literarylightbox.com in Winter 2016-17.

Lying in Vengeance (2017): 33-year-old Portland man Peter Robertson must choose between two horrible options, as a former fellow juror blackmails him to kill her stalker ex-boyfriend – or have his violent past exposed.

The Mountain Man’s Dog (2016): Rustic forester Lehigh Carter never suspected that adopting an injured stray on the highway would entangle him in the complex world of crooked cops and power-hungry politicians—or force him to flee into the forest in fear for his life.

The Mountain Man’s Bride (2017): Lehigh must prove that his fiancée is innocent of murdering a popular Acting Sheriff — but evidence of a secret affair makes even Lehigh wonder if he should fight for her freedom against the corrupt local machine that accused her.

The Mountain Man’s Badge (2018): Lehigh Carter never asked to be sheriff. And he sure never wanted to arrest his new father-in-law for murder.  Can Lehigh uncover the truth behind Everett Downey’s murder without becoming the killer’s next victim?

Fern Prairie, WA — The second annual Fern Prairie ART FEST is a two-day event connecting local artists and the community on Saturday and Sunday, July 31 and August 1 from 10am to 4pm. The ART FEST is staged in the peaceful and tranquil setting of Shangri-La Farm, located 1.5 miles north of Lacamas Lake just outside the city limits of Camas, Washington. A total of 15 artists will participate in the juried show.

“These fine artists are excited to show and sell their work at ART FEST,” said organizer and local artist Liz Pike. Liz will be joined by artists Sarah Bang, Bev Birdwell, Tom Daniels, Derek Danielson, Cheryl Folkers, Dave Garbot, David Gerton, Suzanne Grover, Charlene Hale, Gail Haskett, Amy Jan Ernst, Cheryl Mathieson, Keith Russell and Diane Springer. Original work includes paintings in oils, acrylics and watercolor, pastels, mixed media, pottery, ceramics, fused and enamel glass, jewelry, pen and ink, wood, cast metal and copper mixed media.

The public is invited to take in original works of art surrounded by the beautiful gardens at Shangri-La Farm. Attendees will park at rented Grove Field Airport parking lot, 632 NE 267th Avenue, Camas, WA. Guests may either walk the 1/4 mile trail through the woods to Shangri-La Farm or take the free “Sunflower Mobile” shuttle service. The Sunflower Mobile is an art piece all on its own, hand painted by Liz Pike in oils on fiberglass in her signature sunflower motif. The free shuttle will be available to transport attendees from the airport parking lot to Shangri-La Farm on both days, Saturday and Sunday, July 31 and August 1 between 10am and 4pm.

For more information, contact Liz Pike at 360-281-8720 or email [email protected]

Art Fest
By Sara Bang.
Art Fest
By Amy Jan Ernst

Washougal, WA — Washougal area artists are once again opening their studio doors to offer a fascinating and art-filled family outing for Mother’s Day weekend.  The 2021 Washougal Studio Artists Tour, to be held May 8-9 from 10 am to 4 pm, will include 8 stops and features 15 local artists representing a vast array of creative works and mediums.

“We are excited to safely invite visitors back into our studios and outdoor display areas for this year’s event,” said Shirley Bishop, WSTA co-coordinator and local glass artist.  “Last year we held a virtual tour and promoted our artists online. It just wasn’t the same. The art experience is so much richer when a patron can visit an artist’s studio. They are able to see where the magic of creating art happens and learn about both the art and the artists.” 

Now in its fourth year, WSTA has drawn much interest and support from the local community and visitors from the Portland area and beyond.  

“We are delighted that many people taking the tour are discovering Washougal for the very first time,” said Bishop. “And they really enjoy the tour route that winds along the scenic Washougal River and through the Washougal foothills.  It’s nearly as beautiful as the art!”   

Washougal
www.clarkcountyrelocations.com

The Washougal area boasts many high-quality professional artists. 

“It is no wonder,” said Bishop. “There is so much natural beauty to be found here that it serves as inspiration to these talented artists.”

New to this year’s tour are Trish Johnston, watercolor; Dana Bergdahl, acrylic & watercolor; Stu Ager, mixed media: organic metalwork design; India de Landa, contemporary art jewelry; Samuel Shrout, casted metal and wood, and Nancy Carkin, acrylic, oil and watercolor. 

Returning artists are: Char McHugh, ceramics; Anna Wiancko-Chasman, clay & mixed media; Cyndee Starr, mixed media; Kathy Marty, handwoven eco-friendly rugs; Shirley Bishop, fused glass; Tamara Dinius, mixed media; Toni McCarthy, original beaded jewelry; Sharon Ballard, acrylic painting; and Jean Hauge, multi-media.

New this year is the Runaway Kitchen food truck at tour stop #4, offering delicious meals and snacks for hungry shoppers. 

Preview participating artists’ work and see the tour map on the Washougal Studio Artists website 

www.WashougalStudioArtists.org   

You may also follow them on Facebook and Instagram. Participating artists will also have copies of the map available, as well as many local businesses.

Washougal, WA — A recent Camas-Washougal Community Chest grant will support Washougal School District efforts to address historical, systemic inequalities for students with disabilities. The CWCC funds will provide the community with on-demand viewing access of the award-winning documentary Hearts of Glass on June 2-12, 2021.  This will be the first showing of the movie promoted in Washington State. 

This 2018 film follows the initial months of operation of Vertical Harvest, a state-of-the-art hydroponic greenhouse that grows crops while providing meaningful, competitively paid jobs for people with disabilities working alongside people without disabilities.  

“Our goal is to bring awareness of the needs for competitive employment opportunities within our community for young adults with disabilities,” said Jessica Nickels Washougal Adult Transition Program Teacher.

A follow up webinar discussion panel will also be presented on June 9, featuring a Washougal community member, former WSD student, and the films’ cast and crew.  

“The discussion aims to create awareness of the benefits of hiring people with disabilities from the perspective of the individual and the employers,” said Nickels.  “This conversation and collaboration between the school district and community will also help improve employment outcomes for these young workers.”

“Our goal is for the film and webinar to provide a platform to advocate for greater inclusion of individuals of differing abilities into all aspects of our community,” explained Heather Kassel, WSD ELA/EdTech Instructional Coach. “The discussion around the film is meant to serve as a catalyst for change and the creation of new partnerships between local businesses and the school district.”

“This film shows that innovation and inclusion can go hand-in-hand, benefiting citizens with disabilities and the community at large,” said filmmaker Jennifer Tennican in a press release.

“Our vision with this project is to align with the Washougal School District’s mission to Know, Nurture, and Challenge ALL students to rise,” said Kassel.  “The district strives to promote equitable educational opportunities for all students, and this film provides a model of what is possible.”

“It is our task as a school district to prepare students for successful post-secondary outcomes,” said Nickels. “It is our task as a community to recognize individual’s abilities and to work toward equitable inclusion into social and economic aspects of our community.”

Find the movie during the June 2-12 view period on the WSD website. The trailer can be viewed at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EuBSMUZa8wQ. For additional information about this film, please visit https://www.heartsofglassfilm.com/

Washougal, WA – Volunteers at the Two Rivers Heritage Museum are excited to open their doors for visitors on Saturdays 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. starting April 3 after their sudden shut down last March due to the pandemic.

“We can’t wait to welcome guests and our membership back to the museum,” said Jim Cobb, Camas Washougal Historical Society President.  “All volunteer docents will have full vaccine protection and we will of course be following all COVID 19 safety protocols including masks, social distancing and cleaning.”

The museum’s reception area and is now home to the “Gorge” display, created in 2019 by Discovery High School students.  This 9×4 foot scale model presenting 90 miles of the Columbia River Gorge with landmarks that light up, is now more accessible with better viewing opportunities.  The room also received a new coat of paint and the museum gift store has been reorganized and has a fresh new look.

“Spring of 2020 we were all ready to open with fresh paint and new displays created during our regular winter closure,” said Karen Johnson, display committee member.  “We made significant changes in both the Museum main building and the Carriage House.”

Museum interior work was made possible by volunteer Walt Eby, who worked out a plan for rearranging the spaces and made sure all the pieces would come together in a cohesive design. “There was a lot of measuring, right down to tape strips on the floor where cabinets would be placed,” said Johnson. Big Al’s Movers was hired to help move the large display pieces into place.

The four-year-old “School Days” exhibit in the rotating display room was taken apart with some artifacts sent back to storage while others were moved to displays in other parts of the museum. 

“That room has now been turned into an impressive Native American exhibit with woven baskets and stone bowls and tools,” Johnson said.

The Carriage House, built in 2009, was also transformed with new displays to make the area more interesting for visitors.  A vintage buggy was moved from the floor to a high ledge which provides much better viewing and made room for more items.

A new display in the Carriage House, “All Boxed Up,” is located on the corner ledge over the doorway.  It features vintage folding wooden grocery boxes branded with names of local stores.  The addition of large banner pictures of local markets from the past adds a special touch and informative signage helps to tell the story.  

A collection of surveying and mineral artifacts can be found in another new Carriage House display, “From Here to There.”  

“It describes how the survey tools and the Donation Land Act of 1851 are related to the history of our community,” Johnson said.  

Another new display focuses on mining in the area and is called “Relics from the Last Chance Mine.”  

Display Committee volunteer members are Karen Johnson, Richard Johnson, Walt Eby, Gayle Godtlibsen, and Ivar Godtlibsen.

Visitors will also be impressed by the progress of the Native American-inspired Gathering Place at Washuxwal longhouse pavilion that sits on the museum’s southern side.  The four-year construction project is now in its final stages of completion.   

The pavilion’s design is based on the traditional cedar plank houses used by Native American tribes who lived in what is now East Clark County in the early 19th century.

“We are looking forward to telling stories of the area’s earliest inhabitants and to use the space for cultural and community events and field trips,” said Cobb.

The Two Rivers Heritage Museum is located at 1 Durgan Street in Washougal and is currently only open Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.  Admission costs are $5 for adults, $4 for seniors, $2 for students and free for children under 5 and all CWHS members.  Group tours are available any day of the week (by appointment only).  Call 360-835-5449 for scheduling.

“Our community has so much to be proud of in this museum,” said Cobb.  “We hope local folks who have not had a chance to see the museum will stop in and look around at all we have to offer.”

CWHS is always looking for volunteers and new members to join and help support the preservation of local history. More information about the CWHS and the Two Rivers Heritage Museum can be found on their website at www.2rhm.com.

Museum
Getting a tour of Two Rivers Heritage Museum.

Folk duo Fox and Bones offers custom songwriting services for the perfect contact-free gift

Camas, WA — With lockdowns and quarantines affecting many long-standing holiday traditions this year, local band Fox and Bones has come up with the perfect contact-less gift that allows people to express their love from a distance. The duo, who previously made their living touring internationally but moved home to Camas when the first wave of lockdowns hit, put their minds together to create “Our Custom Song”, a boutique personalized songwriting service where they are commissioned to write what they call “the ultimate expression of love” —  a highly personalized, radio quality song.

Though Fox and Bones, aka Sarah Vitort and Scott Gilmore, launched this new service in the wake of COVID-19 shutdowns, the idea for Our Custom Song initially came to the real life couple three Christmases ago, when Gilmore wrote Vitort a song and gave it to her as a Christmas present. 

“To this day it’s the best gift I’ve ever received, truly a gift that keeps on giving. There is nothing quite like the feeling of being someone’s muse,” said Vitort. 

Vitort realized that equipped with 20+ combined years of songwriting experience that feeling was one they could offer to others and became more valuable than ever when COVID changed everyone’s lives.

The custom songwriting process begins with an hour-long ZOOM consultation, where Vitort and Gilmore ask thought provoking questions in order to step into their customers’ shoes before writing the song. In addition to the initial consultation, customers get two rounds of edits between the first and final drafts to ensure the song is exactly what they want. Customers also get to choose the genre, feel and instrumentation of the song, and are offered add-ons like their own photo slideshow music video, an engraved lyric plaque, or a CD of the song.

“It didn’t feel somebody created this song just because it was purchased, it felt like you guys really could understand how we felt, and took all the stories and things that we talked about and made them come to life,” said Shelby Cinnamon, who, with her siblings, commissioned a song for her mom for Mother’s Day. 

Her sister Carley, a Camas resident, added, “I wish I had the words to convey to people how special and how meaningful the entire process was. It’s such a priceless song that we will treasure forever.”

In addition to custom songs, Our Custom Song also offers a more budget-friendly option in the form of “Song-Grams,” where clients can choose any song for the duo to cover with a special dedication to the recipient, a nostalgic cross between a singing telegram and a radio song dedication. 

Our Custom Song was created by Vitort and Gilmore as a way for people to commission personalized songs for the people they love most. Vitort and Gilmore use their 20 years of combined songwriting and music industry experience and their deep ability to empathize to create heartfelt, radio quality songs for their customers. The pair has been lauded for their songwriting in outlets such as Parade Magazine, No Depression, and Pop Matters since they formed in 2016.

Interested parties are encouraged to learn more and book their song at www.ourcustomsong.com

 

Band
Sarah Vitort and Scott Gilmore of Fox and Bones.

Washougal, WA — The eerie sound of chains rattling, footsteps across a wooden floor, actors voicing character dialog and a healthy dose of imagination.  These are just some of the elements that will bring “Charles Dickens A Christmas Carol – A Radio Play” to life by the Jemtegaard Middle School Soundstage students and staff.

“Last spring our Soundstage club was supposed to perform The Box by Lindsay Price and then of course COVID happened,” said Diana Larson, Soundstage creator and advisor.  “It was a big disappointment.  We had the scenery ready and everything.  We considered a mini version, but it just would not have been the same.” 

Not wanting to disappoint the students again, it was decided to perform a radio play this fall.  “We found that there were a lot of radio show scripts out this year,” said Larson.  “We were excited to find this classic holiday story and it even came with sound effects.  We decided to do it!”   

Soundstage club members were ready for the challenge, having met over the summer with upwards of 20 students attending the weekly sessions.  Larson used her connections with actors, singers, and dancers from New York through her years in vocal training to connect her students on Zoom to professionals in the entertainment industry.  “We had online dance instruction, sing-a-longs, monolog sessions and even had a very special guest, Juliana Conte, a singer/dancer who has appeared in New York in Spring Awakening and the Adams Family,” she said. John Armor, Shakespearean actor and stage combat choreographer for Portland Opera and other theater companies, also provided virtual lessons over the summer.

The radio show was cast via virtual auditions in October. “The great thing for students is that no one has to work to memorize the lines,” said Larson. “They will read them as their character.  There will be no visuals, just the listeners’ imagination.” 

Washougal
www.artfuljuxtaposition.com

Rounding out the cast will be several notable special guests. John Hugill, a local Portland actor, will anchor the show and perform the lead role of Ebenezer Scrooge.  JMS principal, David Cooke, will read the part of Bob Cratchit and WSD Superintendent Mary Templeton will voice Mrs. Cratchit.  Other JMS staff participating include History teachers Scott Rainey and Scott Hoisington. 

“The student actors were outstanding,” said Templeton.  “They came to the recording prepared.  They knew their lines, their characters and had vocal presence.  They created a presentation that is artistic and engaging.” 

Each actor will record their part via Zoom and then it will be professionally edited together, with sound effects, for the final product.  “Our sound engineer, Vic Sorisio, is doing the recording and editing,” said Larson.  “He also coached the students to understand how they need to sit and speak during their recording for the best sound quality.” 

Recordings took place November 2 and 5 and the show will be available online on the Washougal School District website on December 4.  Just in time for the holidays. 

“My goal is to provide these students an opportunity to be a part of a production and experience that joy and satisfaction,” said Larson.  “I also hope that the show brings our community together with a shared holiday experience.”