Art presents itself in so many different forms and can incorporate many different media. This became a challenge and opportunity for Canyon Creek Middle School 6th grade art teacher, Alice Yang, once schools closed and distance learning began.

“During our first week of distance learning in mid-April, students hadn’t gotten their art kits from me yet, so I had to come up with a project using household items,” Yang explained. “We started our unit by looking at some artists who use cardboard and paper as their medium. I uploaded a video that shows several ways of connecting cardboard, some that do not use glue. The assignment was very open-ended, to create a sculpture using cardboard or paper which they could paint or decorate as they wished.”

Projects submitted by students included a cuckoo clock, a Polaroid camera, shoes, and a boat. One project, created by Morgan Musser, stood out with its intricate detail and the spiraling form which gave it a sense of movement and realism.

“Morgan worked about six hours a day for this week-long assignment,” said Yang. “When we shared the projects during our weekly Zoom meeting, the other students were blown away. Some felt a bit down that theirs weren’t at the same level, so we stopped and talked about the danger of comparison and how everyone is good at something.”

Learning
Remote art lessons.

“I was inspired by pictures of Chinese Dragons I viewed on the internet,” explained Musser. “I used tinfoil to make a form for the body, which I later learned from my art teacher is called armature.”

Musser further explained her process, that began by cutting out each individual scale from thin cardboard, empty waffle boxes, and hot glued them to the form. She used a thicker cardboard, from a shipping box, for the back spines, which also provided a different element of color. Then she cut different shapes for the face and pieced them together in a kind of puzzle and secured the pieces in place with hot glue. “My favorite element of this piece is the dragon’s face,” she said. “I was nervous about the final result, but it turned out better than I expected.”

Distance learning overall has been a challenge for Yang and all WSD art teachers. “Not having access to materials is the biggest roadblock,” she said. “I was able to put together an art kit for my 30 sixth-grade students containing a drawing kit, oil pastels, watercolor set, a sketchbook, glue stick, and an assortment of papers. They received these during their second week of remote classes.”

Art instruction is a feedback-driven process, Yang explained, saying it can be difficult for students to work in isolation without input from the teacher and peers. Access to the internet is also a driving factor in students’ ability to complete work. Most of the projects involve viewing videos in Google Classroom, and though all students have iPads, some don’t have the capability of using it for online work.

“I appreciate the time and effort students are putting in and am impressed with the work that is coming back,” Yang said, “However, I’m so ready to return to school!”

Back to Carolina is a cozy beach romance set in coastal North Carolina. 

Dean Taylor is excited to tackle the final assignment before officially making partner at his firm, that is until he learns he must return to his hometown to close the deal. Driving past road signs and ball fields, he is overwhelmed by images from the past he had run away from a decade ago and of which he had no desire to return. 

Dean’s plans to get in, grab a signature, and get out quickly are abruptly dashed as the CEO of Cape Fear Commercial demands that Dean spends a week getting to know each of the company’s facilities. Compounding Dean’s challenge, Cape Fear’s Public Relations Director assigned to take him on the tour is a college ex-girlfriend, a relationship that he acknowledges he did not end in particularly gallant fashion. At every turn during his stay, Dean runs into people from his past. Unresolved relationships weighing on him, he launches into an ill-advised apology tour. 

As Dean confronts his past, he finds himself unwittingly smitten with Shelby James, a wary military widow struggling to move past the heartbreak of losing her husband. Life’s turns continue to pit the two together as they begin to build a fragile, reluctant relationship unlocking hearts and healing wounds of the past, cultivating a warm, coastal Carolina romance.    

A work trip inspired Sjostrom to write Back to Carolina.

Carolina
Seth Sjostrom.

“I left my hometown at such an age that my tail was on fire, ready to conquer the world. There was surely scorched earth in my wake. As I drove through my old college town, I couldn’t help but to consider friends and relationships that I either left behind or were simply overwhelmed by the overgrown weeds of time,” Sjostrom shares. 

Back to Carolina follows Dean Taylor as he struggles to overcome the fears of facing his past and rebuilding relationships that were once dear to him. In doing so, he finds his mature self finally ready to accept present day relationships, such as his budding romance with Shelby.

Seth is a Camas, Washington resident. A serial entrepreneur and author, Back to Carolina, is his fifth novel. The thrillers Blood in the SnowBlood in the Water, Penance, as well as the holiday romance Finding Christmas were his first books published. 

For more information or to order his books, check out www.sethsjostrom.com for pre-launch discounts. Back to Carolina goes to print May 1st.

Elida’s Annual Sample Sale Silent Auction is happening now on Facebook.

Starts Friday, Nov. 29th @ 9:00am
Ends Sunday, Dec. 1st @ 9:00pm
Starting bids as low as $35.

This is a great opportunity to own original artwork at a discounted price!
Bids starting as low as $35! Buy local, buy original!

Here’s how bidding works:

To bid on a painting during this Silent Auction, write your bid in the comment section for the piece you want (CLICK ON THE PAINTING YOU WANT AND COMMENT THERE). Watch your painting over the weekend and re-bid. If you are outbid (bidding is increments of $10). Bidding ends at 9 pm Pacific Time on Sunday. We will contact the winner through Facebook Messenger. For questions, email Stephanie at [email protected].

Link to Elida’s facebook page where you can access the sale on Friday:
https://www.facebook.com/elida.field

Silent Auction

The award winning Clark College Orchestra will present its Fall concert as part of the 2019-20 season celebrating the 30th anniversary of Music Director/Conductor Donald Appert on Wednesday, December 4 at Skyview High School in Vancouver, WA. 

This all-orchestral extravaganza will include La Valse by Maurice Ravel, Nuages and Fêtes from Claude Debussy’s Nocturnes and Josef Suk’s Symphony No. 1 in E minor. The performance is at 7:30 pm and admission is free and open to the public. Donations to the Orchestra General Fund will be accepted at the door.

For complete information about all the Clark College Music Department concerts including the orchestra, concert band, jazz ensemble, and choirs, please see http://www.clark.edu/campus-life/arts-events/music/music-concerts.

Donald Appert has appeared as a guest conductor in Japan, Australia, Central America, and throughout Europe.  In Italy La’ovadese wrote, “…the performance of the ‘Serenade in C Major’ of Tchaikovsky, under the exceptional direction of Appert, was in such a style that it brought out the elegance and grace of the melodic lines with Mozartian inspiration.  …The L’Orchestra Sinfonica Città di Grosseto… performed the Barber ‘Adagio’ with rare effectiveness, emphasizing its intrinsically rich melody.”  Giornale di Sicilla praised his interpretation of Nielsen’s First Symphony as “lyrical with an airy freshness,” and his conducting as “precise, painstakingly accurate, and diligent.”  In the United States, he has appeared as a guest conductor of the Vancouver (Washington) Symphony, the University of Texas – Arlington Symphony Orchestra, the Eastern Washington University Symphony Orchestra, and the University of Central Arkansas Symphony.

As one of only five musicians chosen, Dr. Appert received the 2015 Honored Artists of The American Prize, the Honored Artists being “…individuals who have proven themselves to be musicians of “sustained excellence” over a number of seasons as contestants in the competitions.”  Adding to this distinctive honor is his 2011 The American Prize in Orchestral Programming – Vytautas Marijosius Memorial Award for his work with the Oregon Sinfonietta.  

Orchestra
www.MeuPilates.com

Dr. Appert was awarded the 2015 ASCAPLUS Award in recognition of his performances in Italy and the United States.  His awards in previous years were for performances in Romania, Qatar, Europe, Central America, Japan, and the United States.  Dr. Appert is the recipient of the 2014 Clark County Arts Commission Lifetime Achievement in the Arts Award, and in 2009, he received the Washington Community College Humanities Association Exemplary Status Award in recognition of his outstanding contributions to the Humanities. 

As a member of ASCAP, most of Dr. Appert’s compositions have been published and his works have been performed throughout the world.  A recent work, Concerto for Cello and Orchestra, commissioned by, and for, Jeffrey Butler of the Houston Symphony, had its world première to great applause on June 17, 2018, with Mr. Butler as soloist and the Clark College Orchestra accompanying him.       

Attic Gallery, which is located in historic Downtown Camas, is currently featuring the enticing works of artist Earl Hamilton. The gallery, which recently opened a new Exhibition Room, also has a brand-new frame shop where you can custom order frames to meet your artistic needs.

Earl Hamilton, now in his sixties, spent most of his childhood living in a small cabin in the Rodgers Mountain area outside the town of Scio (Oregon) in the Willamette valley, with his parents Satsuko and George Hamilton, both successful artists. The family lived self-sufficiently on their secluded homestead, painting together in their cabin’s living room. Thus, from an early age, Earl was influenced to enter the art world. Living a frugal lifestyle, hauling water, milking goats, collecting eggs from their chickens and minus TV and radio, he was encouraged to read and talk a lot about art. Earl learned self-sufficiency and a desire to follow his own artistic instincts. He now lives in Lebanon, another small Oregon town, where he works on his paintings every day and usually most of the night. 

Earl studied art in high school where he won a Scholastic Gold Key award for the State of Oregon and a National Gold Medal Scholastic Award for a competition in New York City. He won an art scholarship while studying art at Oregon State University. In 1980, Earl won The Grumbacker Award for the Northwest Watercolor Society, and 1981 the First Place Sweepstake Award for the Watercolor Society of Oregon. 

Earl’s paintings are filled with a kind of whimsical lightness reflected in many images such as castles, clowns, children, animals and lovers. He layers acrylics and uses collage materials in many of his abstract works. Earl’s paintings whether abstract or whimsical objects, could be called meditative, mystical, contemplative, energetic, bold and confident in brushstroke.

Hamilton
One of the works of Earl Hamilton.

“I knew that I would always be an artist,” said Hamilton. ”Art has become a way of life for me, of perceiving and being. You take art with you whether you paint or not. It’s in your eyes and in your hands.”

To learn more, visit www.AtticGallery.com

The gallery is open Tuesday through Saturday from 11 am to 5 pm.

Hamilton
The works of Earl Hamilton are on display at Attic Gallery.

Washougal, WA — Washougal students from Jemtegaard and Canyon Creek Middle Schools are the newest contributors to the surge of public art in Washougal.  On October 12, a crisp, sunny Saturday morning, more than 25 student artists from the Club 8 after-school program met to create a patchwork Chinook salmon mural on a public retaining wall at the corner of “D” and Durgan Streets downtown.

The creative mural work began weeks ahead when Club 8 students, lead by JMS art teacher, Dani Allen, met with local muralist Travis London to come up with their individual designs for the piece.   Allen was the driving force behind the project that has been envisioned for several years.

“This was a great example at the partnerships that take place in Washougal to support art,” said Allen.  “City of Washougal supplied the location and cleaned and primed the wall.  Washougal Schools Foundation provided a grant for the paint and a consulting fee for Travis.  Washougal Arts and Culture Alliance worked to bring these relationships together and Washougal School District supports the middle school Club 8 after-school program.”

“It’s great working with middle school students,” said London. “They enjoyed learning the process of mural creation.  I met with them just once and gave them tips and direction on how to take these designs from paper to a wall. They did great!”

London conceived of the Chinook salmon design to serve as a template because of how the fish represents the Washougal area.

According to Allen, the message around the mural was to celebrate diversity and individuality.  

Mural
www.MeuPilates.com

“Students took inspiration from the theme that being different is ok and differences should be celebrated,” she said.  “They wanted the images to be positive and inspirational.  The students took their design and this project very seriously.  Just look at how many kids came out early on a Saturday to be a part of it.”

“I love painting and love making our world a better place,” explained Aubrey Kleiva, JMS 6th grade student.  “It is cool because I can make people smile through art.”  Her section of the mural included a quote to
offer encouragement.  Her words are; “Life can be a rough current but just keep swimming through it.”

Allen and her Club 8 art students were also responsible for creating a mural on the baseball shed at Lower Hathaway Park ball field in 2018 and are already looking at locations for their next public art project.

There’s been a surge of public art in Washougal: https://lacamasmagazine.com/2019/10/official-unveiling-of-the-white-wing-mural-in-honor-of-betsey-ough.html

Mural
Creating the mural.
Mural
The completed mural.

The City of Washougal is inviting the community to celebrate the city’s history and its newest piece of public art with the official unveiling of the White Wing Mural in honor of Betsey Ough, Wednesday, October 9 at 4 pm.  The ceremony will take place in front of the piece, located outside the Washougal Library at 1661 C Street, Washougal.  A reception will follow in the Washougal Community Center next door. 

“If you are familiar with Washougal’s history, you know that Betsey White Wing Ough, a Cascades Tribe princess, along with her husband Richard Ough, founded our great city,” said Jim Cooper, Washougal Arts and Culture Alliance board president.  “For her role, Betsey is lovingly referred to by many as the ‘Mother of Washougal.’ The theme of the mural is Richard Ough courting Betsey White Wing Ough.” 

WACA spearheaded the effort and lead fund raising for the work. 

Mural artist Toma Villa is an internationally renowned Native American artist.  He will attend the dedication and share his thoughts about White Wing and how he developed the 8’-11” x 25’ scene.  “Through my extensive research on Betsey Ough (White Wing) of the Washougal people, I found her story inspiring on a personal level,” he said. “What it shows is how love can change one’s life and what can be created from it.” 

Inspiration came in part from a quote describing Richard Ough’s feelings for the young princess. “…he thought he could see White Wing in the clouds and in the forest and in his dreams.  He said, “Come pretty bird and fly with me, for I am lonely, and my nest is empty.”

Mural

For the mural, Villa chose to feature the egret bird to represent White Wing for its beauty and grace. “I used seven of them for that is a significant number in Columbia River longhouses,” he explained. “They are facing East; of the way the wind blows on the river. The baskets are from the Two Rivers Heritage Museum and are part of a greater collection in Washougal, accenting the mural representative of White Wing as a weaver same as her grandmother.” 

The unveiling and dedication ceremony program will begin with a Washaat Prayer by Members of the Yakima Nation, White Swan Longhouse in the tradition of their native heritage. In addition to Villa, speakers will include Washougal Mayor, Molly Coston speaking about how influential White Wing was as a woman and native landowner in early Clark County.  

Former Washougal City Council member, Joyce Lindsay, will also speak on the impact and attention drawn to Native American cultures by efforts such as the Confluence and the inspiration that led WACA to work with the artist that would memorialize Princess White Wing in this colorful mural.  

Another speaker will be Elder Johnnie Lee Wyman, who will represent the Yakima Nation and is a Great Great Grandson of Richard and Betsey Ough through their son, Benjamin Ough.  Wyman will speak on behalf of his family about the significance of this gift in honor of White Wing and how it impacts her future generations.

Attendees of the ceremony are invited to meet and greet the Ough family descendants, artist Toma Villa, city leaders, and the WACA board at the reception following in the Washougal Community Center – 1681 C Street.  Additional historic information will be provided at the reception by the Two Rivers Heritage Museum.

To learn more about Washougal artwork: https://lacamasmagazine.com/2019/03/artswa-funds-new-art-at-washougal-schools-roots-and-wings-celebration.html

Washougal WA — The Camas-Washougal Historical Society was presented a check for $5,000 from The Honorable Frank L. and Arlene J. Price Foundation on Tuesday, September 3 at the Two Rivers Heritage Museum.

CWHS board members looked on as Kay Dalke-Sheadel, Price Foundation Executive Director presented the funds to CWHS president, Jim Cobb. The grant is the second received by CWHS by The Price Foundation and is earmarked for the Gathering Place at Washuxwal project, a Native American-inspired longhouse replica to be located on the south side of the museum.  

“The building’s foundation is poured, cedar logs delivered, and we will begin structural construction soon,” said Cobb. “We know this outdoor pavilion will provide a beautiful, new venue at our museum to tell important stories of our area. We are honored that The Price Foundation accepted our grant proposal and is helping to make our vision a reality.”

The Price Foundation was created to provide funding for education, health and historical preservation projects in Clark and Cowlitz Counties.  “It is exciting for me to see this money at work locally,” said Dalke-Sheadel.  “Our giving supports education and historic preservation and you will be doing both with this grant!”

The CWHS launched its Gathering Place capital fund raising campaign in fall of 2017.  So far, there has been more than $200,000 raised in in-kind gifts, grants and donations. Fund raising continues for the final stages of the project that include Native American carvings and artwork to adorn the pavilion, educational signage and landscaping.

Historical Society
Kay Dalke-Sheadel and Jim Cobb at the site.

“We are so grateful to the Price Foundation, our members and the community for their continuing support to help this project come to life,” Cobb said.  

The Gathering Place is expected to help attract tourists, educational field trips and history lovers to the Two Rivers Heritage Museum and the community. “We look forward to increasing our ability to share stories of our earliest history,” Cobb said. 

Find more information on The Gathering Place at Washuxwal visit www.2rhm.com.   Donations can be made online.  CWHS mission is to research, collect, preserve, and make available the rich history of Camas and Washougal, WA for the public.  Contributions are tax-deductible to the extent allowed by law.  CWHS is a registered tax-exempt organization, Tax ID #91-1181503.

The Two Rivers Heritage Museum is located at 1 Durgan Street in Washougal and open March through October.  Regular hours are Thursday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.  Admission costs are $5 for adults, $4 for seniors, $2 for students and free for children under 5 and all CWHS members.  Group tours are available any day of the week (by appointment only).  Call Lois Cobb 360-835-5449 for scheduling.

Historical Society

CAMAS, WA — Artist Liz Pike will be painting at the Downtown Camas Plein Air Art Event on Fri., Sept. 6 from 9 am to 4 pm. Her finished work, along with 30 other artists will be viewed by the public that evening from 5-8 pm at Camas Art Gallery, 408 NE Fourth Avenue, where the community will vote for its favorites.

Finished pieces will be auctioned off at Camas Dinner in White the following evening.  Camas Gallery is also featuring a “dual artist” live paint demonstration on Friday night by Liz Pike and fellow Artist Sarah Bang starting at 4:30 pm. Each artist starts on a painting and then every 15 minutes, switches places until the painting is complete. This activity is a crowd favorite at Camas First Friday.

On Sat., Sept. 7, Pike will display new works at the Old Town Battle Ground Vintage Art Faire from 11 am to 5 pm. She will be doing a live painting demonstration in oils on canvas at her art booth located in the Urban Basics parking lot, 209 East Main Street in downtown Battle Ground. Pike’s work will also be featured in a four-day show at the Portland Fall Home & Garden Show at the Expo Center in Portland, Oct. 3-6. 

Camas Gallery continues to feature Liz’s “Field of Sunflowers” in oils on canvas, 408 NE Fourth Avenue.

Liz Pike
wwww.MeuPilates.com

“I’m inspired by the beauty of the outdoors. Our gardens at Shangri-La Farm have become both my sanctuary and muse,” says Pike. “I’m thrilled to be one of the featured artists at Camas Gallery and I look forward to sharing all of my new work with the public this fall.” 

Pike has a studio art gallery and an Art Farm, Sip & Paint Studio, at Shangri-La Farm in Fern Prairie, located at 26300 NE Third Street,  Camas. For a complete calendar listing of all of Pike’s art shows throughout 2019, visit her website at www.LizPike.Art

Sip&Paint
Artist Liz Pike.

Beginning September 6 and all through the month, Attic Gallery will feature the works of master artist David Dunlop, who will be part of Friday’s Plein Air event, as well as the featured guest at the gallery’s First Friday reception from 5-8 pm.

September 6th-September 28th
David Allen Dunlop: Oil Paintings on Dibond

DAVID DUNLOP is a modern-day old master whose luminous landscapes draw from both Renaissance techniques and contemporary science.  His paintings have been shown internationally and are held in the collections of major corporations including Aetna Insurance, Citibank, Colgate Palmolive, Delta Airlines, GE Capital Corporation, IBM, Mobil and more.

EMMY AWARD WINNING TELEVISION HOST
David is the engaging host and writer of the 13-show national PBS television series, Landscapes Through Time with David Dunlop, for which he won an Emmy and a CINE Golden Eagle Award in 2009. In 2017, the second series was nominated for an Emmy. Landscapes Through Time is distributed  internationally and returned to U.S. national television in 2018. Both series were produced by SimmonsArt and directed by Connie Simmons and the first was also co-produced by Connecticut Public Television. David is also the host, artist and writer in several other  multi-DVD series on painting landscapes produced by SimmonsArt, blogs regularly, and has a devoted following on YouTube.

EXHIBITIONS
David’s work has been reviewed extensively, including, Art New England and The New York Times. After being juried into the prestigious Art of the Northeast USA, David won the Jens Risom Award and David and his son Max Dunlop won the Revington Arthur Award.

Scholarship
VancouverLaserSkinCareClinic.com

LECTURER
David’s
 reputation as a painter who combines artistic skill, knowledge and enthusiasm prompted The Metropolitan Museum of Art to invite him to lecture on 4000 years of landscape painting in 2005.  He has been a visiting artist/lecturer at many museums and institutions, including the Huntsville Art Museum, Huntsville, AL; Montclair Art Museum, Montclair, NJ; Springfield Museums, Springfield, MA; New Britain Museum of American Art, New Britain, CT; Caramoor Museum of Art, Katonah, NY; Shelburne Museum, Shelburne, VT; and Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum, Tucson, AZ.

Dunlop
“Columbia Gorge” by David Dunlop.

His PBS program on Cezanne is included in the exhibit Cezanne and American Modernism at the Montclair Art Museum.David is exhaustively well-read in pursuit of the underlying principles of art, exploring original sources and recent advances in neuroscience.

TEACHER
David has been a painting teacher at Silvermine Art Guild for many years and has a devoted following around the world.  He teaches workshops on many varied topics throughout the world as well.

David graduated Phi Beta Kappa from the College of Wooster, Wooster, OH, and was honored as a Distinguished Alumnus in 2011. He earned an MFA from The Pratt Institute, NY, NY. He is on the faculty of the Silvermine School of Art in New Canaan, CT, where he teaches, lectures, and leads workshops, as far afield as Italy, France, Spain and Japan. He was honored with their Living Art Award in 2017. David lives in Wilton, CT, with his wife, Rebecca Hoefer.

To learn more, visit www.atticgallery.com