VANCOUVER, WA —   The Clark College Music Department is hosting the 5th Annual Fall Choral Festival on Friday, November 9, 2018 in Gaiser Student Center on the campus of Clark College.  Over 15 area middle and high school chamber and concert choirs will sing in this non-competitive festival which runs from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.  Tickets are $5/person for the day.

“We’re very happy the festival is returning this year,” says Festival Director Dr. Jacob Funk, who is also is the Director of Choirs at Clark College. “Participating choirs get the chance to work with some highly skilled clinicians and receive written feedback on their performance. Each choir will also get to have a mini-clinic onstage, allowing for the other schools to see how a different choir learns new ways to succeed. Two of the Clark College Choirs will perform for all the participating choirs in the middle of the festival. It will be a wonderful time of music making, learning, and supporting each other in song.”

Laser

For complete information about all the Clark College Music Department concerts including the orchestra, concert band, jazz ensemble, and choirs, please see http://www.clark.edu/campus-life/arts-events/music/

Vancouver, WA — Journey Theater Arts Group presents Disney’s “The Lion King Jr,” which will run for two weekends, November 16-25 at Fort Vancouver High School.

A lively stage adaptation of the Academy Award-winning 1994 Disney animated film, “The Lion King Jr.” is the story of a young lion prince living in the flourishing African Pride Lands. Born into the royal family, precocious cub Simba spends his days exploring the sprawling savanna grasslands and idolizing his kingly father, Mufasa, while youthfully shirking the responsibility his position in life requires. When an unthinkable tragedy, orchestrated by Simba’s wicked uncle, Scar, takes his father’s life, Simba flees the Pride Lands, leaving his loss and the life he knew behind. Eventually companioned by two hilarious and unlikely friends, Simba starts anew. But when weight of responsibility and a desperate plea from the now ravaged Pride Lands come to find the adult prince, Simba must take on a formidable enemy, and fulfill his destiny to be king. With music and lyrics by Elton John and Tim Rice, additional music and lyrics by Lebo M., Mark Mancina, Jay Rifkin, and Hans Zimmer, and book by Roger Allers and Irene Mecchi, Julie Taymor’s vision has been brought to life for audiences all over the world.

Performances are November 16-25, 2018 at Fort Vancouver High School, 5700 E 18th St, Vancouver, WA 98661.   Tickets are on sale now at journeytheater.org or by calling 360.750.8550.  Pre-sale adult tickets are $12.  Youth and senior tickets are $10. Tickets for all performances will be $4 more at the door.  Saturday November 17 is family day with all tickets at $10.

Public Performances

Friday, November 16th – 7:00 pm

Saturday, November 17th – 7:00 pm

Sunday, November 18th – 2:00 pm

Friday, November 23rd – 7:00 pm

Saturday, November 24th – 2:00 pm

Sunday, November 25th – 2:00 pm

About Journey Theater Arts Group

Our mission: “Growing youth in character, confidence and creativity, in a Christ centered community.”  Throughout the Portland/Vancouver area, Journey offers dozens of classes for ages 6-18, in drama, dance, voice and more.   In addition, we produce 12 Broadway style shows in four locations during the school year, improv competitions, multiple summer camps and professional-level community theater musicals for all ages in summer.  Journey is a nonprofit educational organization, with offices located at 1400 NE 136th Ave, Suite 201, Vancouver WA, 98684.  Contact at 360.750.8550 or www.journeytheater.org.

San Juan, Puerto Rico — Camas mural artist, Allan Jeffs, has just completed a monthlong series of major projects in hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico. He was hired to create six murals at multiple locations, and is now back in Mill Town taking some off to rejuvenate.

He painted three murals at an Old San Juan restaurant, called El Punto Café, which represented various aspects and history of the island, and Valparaiso, this article’s featured image, is a landscape mural of Chile.

Following that project he traveled to Aibonito, and painted two murals — one at a mountain top Italian restaurant, called Fiore — and the other at a private home owned by Peter Matina. At Fiore, he painted a large 15-foot wide pheasant, which symbolizes elegance to Fiore’s owner.

He the left the mountains, and returned to Old San Juan to paint one mural, and a little painting at the residence of Dr. German Ramirez.

“I love it when the clients are pleased with my work,” said Jeffs. “That’s the most important thing.”

His days were long, often spending 10-14 hours creating the murals while on his feet.

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“I’m really tired,” said Jeffs. “My body hurts. I’ve been home for five days now, and my hands still hurt. I was on my feet all day long, and one day I walked 18,000 steps in the same wall. I’m satisfied with the work.

The clients knew what they wanted, but Jeffs had creative license to create each masterpiece using his talent and imagination. He spent time designing each mural, and each result is almost identical to the original specifications.

He said even though Puerto Rico was severely damaged by last year’s hurricane, he sees many signs of recovery.

“After the hurricane, they are starting to recover,” said Jeffs. “It was horrible there for many months, but nature is coming back, and people are rebuilding their community, and they are preparing for the next hurricane by improving the electrical grid, and using alternative sources of energy, such as solar. They’re getting prepared.

“I saw a lot of progress. There are a lot of people creating art and fashion. The restaurants are getting better and better. Electricity is there full-time in most of the country, but there are still some areas struggling with electrical problems. Puerto Rico has a lot of problems, but they are starting to become better than before. It’s something that you feel. Schools are in session. I think it’s better than what you hear in the news, but they do have a lot of problems with government. I was surprised because everything is getting better, and there are a lot of possibilities there.”

He said the rain forest was severely harmed, and many areas have been closed, and are now starting to open up.

“It’s a great place again for tourism,” said Jeffs. “The prices are very low for airfare to San Juan. It’s hot, it’s a Caribbean island, but it’s a great time to travel there.”

To learn more, go www.AllanJeffs.com

Photo Gallery

 

Washougal, WA — The 2018 Arts Ambassador Scholarship recipients were honored at the recent Enspire Arts Celebration Gala, which was held Saturday at the Black Pearl. The Arts Ambassador Scholarship Program is a newly established program offering $500 scholarships towards instruction in any art form and available for students in grades 6-12 throughout Clark County.

Each recipient of a scholarship will provide an arts based community gift to serve the residents of Clark County. Enspire Arts sought students dedicated to their craft, having a strong desire to keep learning and a motivation to enrich the lives of others. Some students have already had several years of study and some are just beginning their formal instruction. Yet, in all of them there is potential to make a positive and meaningful contribution to the community of Clark County.

Aaron Greene is a senior at Union High School and his community gift will be creating a Peer to Peer String Instruction Program to support the school’s orchestra, as well as provide free lessons to those that may otherwise not have access.  In its first year, the program will have 4 tutors, serving 10 students.

Zoe Hill is an 8th grade student at Jemtegaard Middle School and her community gift will be Reaching Others Through Art.  Zoe will be creating a series of comic drawings highlighting the mental dialogue associated with certain mental conditions. This artwork has the potential to open the doors for discussion with local youth and the challenges they are facing.

Zayah Shore is a 7th grade student at Liberty Middle School and her community gift will be Sharing the Love of Music.  Zayah is zealous to encourage young students to give music a try. She plans to visit elementary classrooms to share what it’s like to learn a new instrument and to encourage kids not to be a afraid of a challenge.  

Zachary Lipinski is a junior at Heritage High School and his community gift will be Connecting with Others Through Music.  Zachary’s love of music has drawn him to want to become an orchestra teacher. Zachary will be providing free public music performances around Clark County.

Cassidy Watson is a junior at Camas High School and her community gift will be The Joy of Dance.  Cassidy is a talented young dancer and is excited at the opportunity to share her joy of dance with others.  Cassidy will be offering three contemporary dance workshops to youth around Clark County.

For more information regarding Enspire Arts, their programs, ways to get involved and making a donation, please see www.enspirearts.org

The 2019 Arts Ambassador Scholarship application period will open March 2019.

Ambassado

From left: Aaron Greene, Zayah Shore, Cassidy Watson, Zoe Hill, and Zachary Lipinski.

Meet Joshua W. Turner. Singer. Songwriter. Musician. Producer. Entrepreneur.

The Tacoma, WA artist is a busy man who’s actively promoting his new debut EP album, “BE OK,” which has catchy hooks, heartfelt lyrics, and colorful, diverse songwriting imagery.

“It’s an enticing story of love, hope, and the longing desire to get up and change,” says Turner. “It was written, recorded and produced by myself over a year span and features guest vocals from both my sister-in-law, Savannah Turner, and my beautiful wife, Erin Turner.”

This specific album is a collection of songs Turner wrote more than a decade ago, and a few written within the last year.

“It’s a compilation of doing music for 13 years, and picking songs that represent me as a solo artist,” said Turner. “This is my first solo album I’ve put out.”

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A fiercely independent man, Turner has chosen Bandcamp.com to his release “Be OK” because it gives him more autonomy.

“Bandcamp is a platform to release an album on your own terms, you can determine pricing and do it more your way,” Turner said. “It’s not as popular but it’s a good starting point to have an album presented in its entirety.”

“Be OK” can be streamed and/or downloaded through this link:
http://joshuawturner.bandcamp.com/album/be-ok

Getting the word out to Music Supervisors is key as he’s chosen the sync licensing route to generate income. It’s not easy, but it works for Turner, and other artists like him. Sync licensing enlists Music Supervisors to set moods for various media productions, and it requires extensive research to know how to do it right.

Turner said his genre is singer-songwriter, which has the feel of one man with a guitar speaking his heart. The music really sets a tone, a mood.

“It has country aspects woven into it, and part of it is my style, and part of it is to make the songs more diverse for sync licensing opportunities,” he said. “I put all my history into one album. “This was a test for me because I needed to figure out how to produce music. The album was released August 30, and it’s gotten some interest. It’s been sent to music supervisors and it’s gaining traction.”

Background

“I got started in my bedroom,” he said. “I grew up on Whidbey Island and I just decided I wanted to sing, and was taught I could develop my voice and going to voice lessons. So, for two years I learned on my own, and then went to Berkeley College of Music in Boston, and I got in and I just started learning how to sing, and while I was there, I was awarded the Berkeley Achievement Scholarship.”

“Then, after Berkeley I went to Musicians Institute in Hollywood to study guitar. I was doing rock music then, and I was in the genre of Smashing Pumpkins meets Gun’s and Roses. I caught up with people who were developing a rock band. We went to red carpets featuring Richie Sambora.”

As time passed, Turner became disheartened and walked away from Los Angeles — and walked away from music. In time, he met his wife and got a normal preschool job teaching music.

“Then I started realizing I wanted to keep making music,” Turner said. “What I had to do was take on the responsibility of being the sole provider, which led me back to music. I opened a music coaching school, where I train singers to be confident about themselves. Confidence issues hold people back in music. I recognize that I have to do several streams of income to support my family. You have to be creative.”

As he prepares for his starring role in the upcoming Camas Theatre production of “Macbeth,” which opens November 8, Camas, WA actor Clayton Lukens reflects on his summer theatrical experience at Hilton Head Island, South Carolina.

Lukens was accepted into the Southeastern Summer Theatre Institute, which is a four-week summer program full show intensive for young actors. This summer, they produced “Tuck Everlasting.”

“You do a full production,” said Lukens. “Some other camps are about workshops, and this is about doing a full-scale production. We arrived and the first day we all go find our houses and the boys are housed in the colored cottages. They placed all the girls in a mansion. The first day we all walked to the beach together and we start in a circle to talk about our goals and what we are able to bring to the team.”

Each summer session has 25 students, plus the crew program with about eight youth, the institute staff and the director, Joe Barros, who has worked on Broadway several times.

“He’s [Barros] is always doing big, big projects,” said Lukens. “He always likes to switch things up.”

Being accepted into the program was a dream come true for Lukens, who found out in March he was accepted into the $6,000 camp — but he’d already been saving his money for about a year.

During application time, he filled out the basics and sent a video audition of him singing and dancing.

“And, so I brought out a friend who choreographed a dance for me,” Lukens said. “Her name is Grace Thompson. I signed my application, and was just doing Little Shop rehearsals and I was waiting. We found out March 16, which was opening day for Little Shop. The whole day I had my Chromebook open in the corner and kept refreshing. I got the email that said I was accepted. I’d been wanting to do this for over a year, and then they placed us all in a Facebook Group. We all got to know each other before we went. It was a virtual audtion process.”

The summer institute had much to do about chemistry with other people, and he was called back for two characters: Jesse Tuck, and Man in Yellow Suit. The whole plot is this family drinks the water and now will never die.

“They learn lessons that life is valuable, and some point you have to get off the wheel so others can experience it,” said Lukens. “I ended up playing Man in Yellow Suit. He wants to monopolize on the water. I was double cast, and then I played ensemble second weekend. That was hard. You have to learn two roles.”

He said the first challenge was having to memorize everything off-book before arrival, which was rough for the “in-the-moment” learner that Lukens is.

Theatre

On the set of “Tuck Everlasting.”

The institute program is pretty tough, with 9-13 hour rehearsal days, every day.

“We spend our time choreographing every scene, learning the music, learning the harmonies,” he said. “We do that for the first two weeks, and it’s very exhausting. We did this seven days a week with only two days off. On those days off, we went to Savannah, and then went to the beach on Hilton Head.”

By the time they got to opening day, he said the team felt very prepared and that they all became really good friends.

The teens did six performances in total, with each lasting 1 hour and 40 minutes — which is a short time for a musical.

“Joe completely reinvented the show,” Lukens said. “It’s very different from what appeared on Broadway. The play flopped on Broadway, so Joe fixed the dents. He incorporated 126 umbrellas into the whole show. It was amazing!”

Breaking umbrellas was a real problem.

So, what did Lukens learn the most from this?

“I think I learned that the biggest part is interpretation,” said Lukens. “It can be funny, and wild and weird, but deep down you have to be a person that the audience can relate to. They taught me how to get deeper into the character. A lot of people can fake it on stage, but making it an actual character so that he feels like a person.”

“Kris Saucedo played Tuck. He went to the program last summer, so I found him on Instagram and he’d been to the institute previously, and he had been helping promote the program. We became really great friends. The set design was amazing. It was the best set I’ve ever stepped on to. They had these umbrellas in the sky, and we had lots of trap doors on the stage. One time I sat in the trap door for four hours while reading a book. It was totally fine to listen.”

“It took us that whole year to save up for it. It was the best experience I’ve ever had with theatre. You’re just in a group of people that all want to do the same things you do. There are some days when you’re with someone for 13 hours, and you want to snap — you get so exhausted. For sure, we had our different groups, but it was just a crazy community to be around. Time moves differently there. It’s its own little world.”

Theatre

Man in Yellow Suit, played by Clayton Lukens.

To be considered for the program, you have to be in high school —as a rising freshman up to a recently graduated senior.

Ben Wolfe started the program, which has flourished through the years. He contributes so much, said Lukens, and he gives everything to that company.

One of the original producers came to the show, and the original Jessie Tuck came and did a Master Class. His name is Andrew Keenan-Bolger. He’s a big broadway celebrity.

“Clayton is an outstanding young man filled with a joy and energy that makes every room he enters a little bit brighter,” said Wolfe. “We loved working with him this summer.”
`
Go to www.summertheatreinstitute.com to learn more.

Photo Gallery

Photos by Southeastern Summer Theatre Institute.

Camas, WA — For this month’s First Friday reception, the Attic Gallery, which is located in Downtown Camas, is featuring new abstract paintings by Earl Hamilton.

The opening reception begins at 5 pm Friday, October 5.

Hamilton was born in Japan, and spent most of his childhood in a small cabin in the Rodgers Mountain Area outside the town of Scio, Oregon in the Willamette Valley, with his parents Satsuko and George. The family lived an independent lifestyle on their secluded homestead, painting together in their cabin’s living room, which set the stage for a life in the art world.

Hill

http://tvc.org/meet-jen

Living a frugal lifestyle, hauling water, milking goats, collecting eggs from their chickens, and without television and radio, Earl was encouraged to read and discuss all forms of art. He learned self-sufficiency and a desire to follow his own artistic instincts.

He now lives with his wife, Michelle, in Lebanon, which is another small Oregon town.

Hamilton does not have a website, but you can learn more about his work at www.AtticGallery.com

Visitors to the Attic Gallery reception this Friday will be treated to wine, refreshments, and music by Paul Chasman. The Attic Gallery has been operating for 45 years, and got its start in Portland.

Hamilton

Earl Hamilton abstract paintings.

Washougal WA — Washougal eighth grade student, Zoe Hill, was one of five Clark County youth to be awarded a $500 Arts Ambassador Scholarship by Enspire Arts, a new, local non-profit which supports young artists in the fields of music, visual art, dance, drama and literary arts.  Other 2018 winners are: Aaron Greene of Union High School (music), Zachary Lipinski of Heritage High School (music), Cassidy Watson of Camas High School (dance), and Zayah Shore of Liberty Middle School (music).

Hill

http://tvc.org/meet-jen

Hill was excited and honored to be selected as a winner for her work in visual arts.  She learned about the opportunity through an email from Jemtegaard Middle School Principal, David Cooke.

“I thought, why not!” she said.

The scholarships are designed for students entering grades 6-12 in the upcoming school year and may be used for private instruction, workshops, and/or summer study.  As a scholarship recipient, each student winner agrees to be an Arts Ambassador and “gift” some of their art or talent to the community.

“Enspire Arts believes in building community through the sharing of artistic expression and encourages youth to reach out and positively impact those in their community,” said Enspire Arts President, Sarah Lightfoot.  Examples are providing music at a senior center, leading peer-to-peer instruction or donating art for display at a homeless shelter.

The application process began last spring and included listing applicants’ previous art instruction, artistic goals and how they might give back to the community through art.  Letters of recommendation were also required and for those Hill counted on her JMS band instructor, Dr. Jennifer Snapp and JMS art teacher, Dani Allen.  “They were so wonderful to read,” she said. “I have them up on my wall at home.”

The final steps were a personal interview and sharing of her sketch book.  Hill is looking forward to using her $500 scholarship for her first formal art instruction and to work with an Enspire Arts Board Member as a mentor to implement a way to give art back to the community.

Hill said she currently uses her art as a stress reliever and as something to do when she is bored.  “I doodle a lot,” she admits.  Her artistic style has changed through the years, starting with anime and then to more detailed and realistic sketching.  “I’m back to more animated and cartoon-like imagery now,” she explained.

Hill sparked an interest from the Enspire Arts scholarship selection committee through a painted piece she created for Snapp when the school choir teacher, Jen Mahorney, passed away suddenly last spring. “This piece demonstrated that Zoe is already using her art to connect with people,” said Lightfoot.

“Enspire Arts was founded with the idea that kids, no matter what skill level can have a positive impact on their community with their artwork.” Lightfoot explained. “The scholarship applicants’ art submission is an accomplishment that exhibits a meaningful and positive contribution to the community of Clark County.”

Hill’s submission, along with the other four winners, will be unveiled and highlighted at Enspire Arts “Tango & Tapas” event on Saturday, October 13 at 7 p.m. The themed fundraiser will be filled with music and dance and held at the new Black Pearl event facility in Washougal on the Columbia River.  Money raised will support Enspire Arts projects. More information can be found at enspirearts.org.

“Our event will feature music of the evening by Latin Jazz vocalist, Jessie Marquez and Clay Giberson, keyboard,” said Lightfoot.  “Guests will enjoy professional Tango performances, a short Intro to Tango community dance lesson and a light selection of Tapas small plates and soft drinks included in the ticket price.” A cash bar will be available.

“We believe in the power of creativity to empower youth and build stronger communities,” said Lightfoot. “We are dedicated to creating vibrant and interactive arts experiences that positively impact communities and engage future generations of artists.”

Hill

Zoe Hill is an eighth grader in Washougal.

San Juan, Puerto Rico — Days after beautifying Camas with his historical mural at Young’s Deli, artist Allan Jeffs flew to Puerto Rico to work on several commissioned murals at local restaurants.

“I love the public response to my mural at Young’s Deli,” said Jeffs. “We love Camas, and while I was looking for work there in Washington, I was hired to come here to Old San Juan to paint murals in two restaurants. I’m finishing those murals next week, after that I’m going to the “mountains” to a small town called Aibonito to paint another mural in a house and maybe one in a restaurant there.”

One of those murals is a street scene of a “vegigante,” which is a traditional Puerto Rican dancer. The mural is based around the dancer, which is vivid with color and local culture. That will be finished soon.

Hoff

www.MyHeavensBest.com

The other is a beach scene from ‘El Yunque,” which has a mountain top with 360 degree views.

Jeffs said “it’s magnificent!”

He does see progress in Puerto Rico as they recover from last year’s massive hurricane, but there is still much work to do. Jeffs plans to be there for several more weeks, and will then return to Camas to see what his next project will be.

To see our video on Jeffs, click here: Jeffs Mural in Camas

To learn more, visit www.AllanJeffs.com

 

Camas, WA — Come enjoy artists in Downtown Camas painting our town! During the day on September 7th from 9 am-4 pm, local artists will be doing painting around town. So fun to watch! Then vote for your favorite during the First Friday event from 5-8pm.

The finished plein air art pieces will be on display at the Camas Gallery, 408 NE 4th, from 5-8 pm that evening. The community will vote for its favorites and “People Choice Awards” will be given. These works of art will then be auctioned off at the Dinner in White on the Columbia, a benefit for the Washougal Library Building Fund, on Saturday, September 8th at Marina Park at the Port of Camas Washougal. For artists who would like to participate, visit here for all the info: www.camasgallery.com/plein-air

 

Plein

Artwork at Journey Community Church.

Other art features, music, and activities that night are:

  • Shops around town will be hosting an artist from downtown’s Elida Field Art Studio’s Art-Women-Wine art group. These ladies do amazing work! They will also have a big party and celebration at Elida Art Studio starting at 8pm, 735 NE 6th. Join in the fun and talk with the artists!
  • Hidden Bronze Bird Tour –find the bronze birds throughout town and see what kinds of funny things they are wearing this year! Be entered to win a great prize basket!
  • Friends of Camas Arts Art Show and Sale at Journey. Help support the arts in the Camas School District!
  • Art guessing game in select locations–guess the artist of a famous piece of artwork and be entered to win!
  • Art shows and receptions at Camas Gallery, 408 NE 4th, will feature Cheryl Matheison and  Attic Gallery, 421 NE Cedar, will feature Jean Schwalbe
    (Note: Second Story Gallery will not be hosting a reception for this First Friday–they’ll see you in October!)
  • Kids’ art crafts and 5th annual coloring contest
  • Rock painting with The Paint Roller!
  • Shop, dine, & have artful fun in Downtown Camas! Receive a free prize ticket for every $10 you spend in downtown.

This information is provided by the Downtown Camas Association.