Washougal, WA — The eerie sound of chains rattling, footsteps across a wooden floor, actors voicing character dialog and a healthy dose of imagination.  These are just some of the elements that will bring “Charles Dickens A Christmas Carol – A Radio Play” to life by the Jemtegaard Middle School Soundstage students and staff.

“Last spring our Soundstage club was supposed to perform The Box by Lindsay Price and then of course COVID happened,” said Diana Larson, Soundstage creator and advisor.  “It was a big disappointment.  We had the scenery ready and everything.  We considered a mini version, but it just would not have been the same.” 

Not wanting to disappoint the students again, it was decided to perform a radio play this fall.  “We found that there were a lot of radio show scripts out this year,” said Larson.  “We were excited to find this classic holiday story and it even came with sound effects.  We decided to do it!”   

Soundstage club members were ready for the challenge, having met over the summer with upwards of 20 students attending the weekly sessions.  Larson used her connections with actors, singers, and dancers from New York through her years in vocal training to connect her students on Zoom to professionals in the entertainment industry.  “We had online dance instruction, sing-a-longs, monolog sessions and even had a very special guest, Juliana Conte, a singer/dancer who has appeared in New York in Spring Awakening and the Adams Family,” she said. John Armor, Shakespearean actor and stage combat choreographer for Portland Opera and other theater companies, also provided virtual lessons over the summer.

The radio show was cast via virtual auditions in October. “The great thing for students is that no one has to work to memorize the lines,” said Larson. “They will read them as their character.  There will be no visuals, just the listeners’ imagination.” 

Washougal
www.artfuljuxtaposition.com

Rounding out the cast will be several notable special guests. John Hugill, a local Portland actor, will anchor the show and perform the lead role of Ebenezer Scrooge.  JMS principal, David Cooke, will read the part of Bob Cratchit and WSD Superintendent Mary Templeton will voice Mrs. Cratchit.  Other JMS staff participating include History teachers Scott Rainey and Scott Hoisington. 

“The student actors were outstanding,” said Templeton.  “They came to the recording prepared.  They knew their lines, their characters and had vocal presence.  They created a presentation that is artistic and engaging.” 

Each actor will record their part via Zoom and then it will be professionally edited together, with sound effects, for the final product.  “Our sound engineer, Vic Sorisio, is doing the recording and editing,” said Larson.  “He also coached the students to understand how they need to sit and speak during their recording for the best sound quality.” 

Recordings took place November 2 and 5 and the show will be available online on the Washougal School District website on December 4.  Just in time for the holidays. 

“My goal is to provide these students an opportunity to be a part of a production and experience that joy and satisfaction,” said Larson.  “I also hope that the show brings our community together with a shared holiday experience.”

Great Barrington, MA — The Great Barrington Declaration, which offers an alternative COVID-19 national and global strategy, was penned by professors at Harvard, Oxford and Stanford universities on October 4, and released to the public October 5, calls for “focused protection” by letting young and low-risk populations carry on with their lives, while protecting the immune compromised and elderly.

It’s been discussed and debated since its early October release, but is it based on proper science?

The Declaration was written by Dr. Jay Bhattacharya, Dr. Sunetra Gupta and Dr. Martin Kulldorff. 

Dr. Martin Kulldorff is a professor of medicine at Harvard University, a biostatistician, and epidemiologist with expertise in detecting and monitoring infectious disease outbreaks and vaccine safety evaluations.

Dr. Sunetra Gupta is a professor at Oxford University, an epidemiologist with expertise in immunology, vaccine development, and mathematical modeling of infectious diseases.

Dr. Jay Bhattacharya is a professor at Stanford University Medical School, a physician, epidemiologist, health economist, and public health policy expert focusing on infectious diseases and vulnerable populations.

The declaration was signed by more than 40 other medical and public health scientists and medical practitioners worldwide.

“As immunity builds in the population, the risk of infection to all – including the vulnerable – falls,” the declaration authors write. “We know that all populations will eventually reach herd immunity – i.e. the point at which the rate of new infections is stable – and that this can be assisted by (but is not dependent upon) a vaccine. Our goal should therefore be to minimize mortality and social harm until we reach herd immunity.”

Who initiated the Declaration?

Dr Kulldorff invited Doctors Bhattacharya Gupta to Massachusetts to record a video outlining an alternative to the current COVID-19 strategy. While meeting, the three spontaneously decided to also write a short declaration to summarize their thinking. 

Why was the Declaration written?

The Declaration was written from a global public health and humanitarian perspective, with special concerns about how the current COVID-19 strategies are forcing children, the working class and the poor to carry the heaviest burden.

The full text of the Great Barrington Declaration

“The Great Barrington Declaration – As infectious disease epidemiologists and public health scientists we have grave concerns about the damaging physical and mental health impacts of the prevailing COVID-19 policies, and recommend an approach we call Focused Protection. 

“Coming from both the left and right, and around the world, we have devoted our careers to protecting people. Current lockdown policies are producing devastating effects on short and long-term public health. The results (to name a few) include lower childhood vaccination rates, worsening cardiovascular disease outcomes, fewer cancer screenings and deteriorating mental health – leading to greater excess mortality in years to come, with the working class and younger members of society carrying the heaviest burden. Keeping students out of school is a grave injustice. 

“Keeping these measures in place until a vaccine is available will cause irreparable damage, with the underprivileged disproportionately harmed.

“Fortunately, our understanding of the virus is growing. We know that vulnerability to death from COVID-19 is more than a thousand-fold higher in the old and infirm than the young. Indeed, for children, COVID-19 is less dangerous than many other harms, including influenza. 

”As immunity builds in the population, the risk of infection to all – including the vulnerable – falls. We know that all populations will eventually reach herd immunity – i.e.  the point at which the rate of new infections is stable – and that this can be assisted by (but is not dependent upon) a vaccine. Our goal should therefore be to minimize mortality and social harm until we reach herd immunity. 

“The most compassionate approach that balances the risks and benefits of reaching herd immunity, is to allow those who are at minimal risk of death to live their lives normally to build up immunity to the virus through natural infection, while better protecting those who are at highest risk. We call this Focused Protection. 

”Adopting measures to protect the vulnerable should be the central aim of public health responses to COVID-19. By way of example, nursing homes should use staff with acquired immunity and perform frequent PCR testing of other staff and all visitors. Staff rotation should be minimized. Retired people living at home should have groceries and other essentials delivered to their home. When possible, they should meet family members outside rather than inside. A comprehensive and detailed list of measures, including approaches to multi-generational households, can be implemented, and is well within the scope and capability of public health professionals. 

”Those who are not vulnerable should immediately be allowed to resume life as normal. Simple hygiene measures, such as hand washing and staying home when sick should be practiced by everyone to reduce the herd immunity threshold. Schools and universities should be open for in-person teaching. Extracurricular activities, such as sports, should be resumed. Young low-risk adults should work normally, rather than from home. Restaurants and other businesses should open. Arts, music, sport and other cultural activities should resume. People who are more at risk may participate if they wish, while society as a whole enjoys the protection conferred upon the vulnerable by those who have built up herd immunity.”

On October 4, 2020, this declaration was authored and signed in Great Barrington, United States, by:

Dr. Martin Kulldorff, professor of medicine at Harvard University, a biostatistician, and epidemiologist with expertise in detecting and monitoring infectious disease outbreaks and vaccine safety evaluations.

Dr. Sunetra Gupta, professor at Oxford University, an epidemiologist with expertise in immunology, vaccine development, and mathematical modeling of infectious diseases. 

Dr. Jay Bhattacharya, professor at Stanford University Medical School, a physician, epidemiologist, health economist, and public health policy expert focusing on infectious diseases and vulnerable populations.

Clark County Public Health Response

Lacamas Magazine asked Clark County Public Health to respond to the Great Barrington Declaration. This is their official statement:

“The way to herd immunity is through vaccination; not by letting people contract a deadly disease. And we are a long way from herd immunity.

”It’s estimated that less than 15 percent of the US population has been infected with COVID-19, yet more than 220,000 people have died. To reach herd immunity, we suspect we’ll need at least 60-70% of the population to become infected. That would mean millions of additional infections and several hundred thousand more deaths – and that’s if the immunity from a COVID-19 infection lasts. And for those who survive COVID-19, we still don’t know the lasting health impacts those individuals will endure.

“While the idea of isolating the vulnerable and opening up society for everyone else may sound appealing to some, it’s not practical. If the virus is spreading in a community, it can make its way to vulnerable populations. Young healthy people can and do contract COVID-19. Then they take it home to their family members, to school to their classmates and teachers, and to work to their colleagues. Vulnerable people still interact with others. They may live with other people or have caregivers. They still need groceries and medical care. They cannot be completely insulated from the rest of the community. We can protect our most vulnerable by wearing face coverings, maintaining physical distancing and practicing good hand hygiene – the things necessary for slowing the spread of the virus in our community.

”Tom Frieden, the CDC director from 2009 to 2017, wrote an opinion piece on herd immunity and COVID-19 for the Washington Post. It’s worth a read: https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/tom-frieden-herd-immunity-wrong-solution-coronavirus/2020/10/16/acb4ae8a-0fe6-11eb-8074-0e943a91bf08_story.html

”For a look at herd immunity a little closer to home: The CDC is doing a large-scale geographic seroprevalence survey that looks for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies among people who had blood collected and tested by commercial labs in certain areas of the U.S. Western Washington is one of the regions. The latest data (samples collected July 6-7) show a seroprevalence estimate of 1.3%, and the seroprevalence has consistently been less than 2.5% in Western Washington. You can check out the data from the survey here: https://covid.cdc.gov/covid-data-tracker/#serology-surveillance.”

Video Links

Do the three authors have any conflicts of interest? 

According to their website, Dr. Kulldorff works on research grants from the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Food and Drug Administration and the non-profit Fund for Public Health in New York City, some of which is related to COVID-19. He has never accepted or received any funding from pharmaceutical companies, nor from any other large corporation. 

Dr. Bhattacharya research funding over the past 22 years of his career has come almost entirely from grants from the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, the US Department of Agriculture, and participation on contracts with the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) via a government contracting research group, Acumen, LLC. He has never accepted or received any funding from pharmaceutical companies, nor from any other large corporation. 

Dr. Gupta’s research funding over the last 30 years has principally been through fellowships and investigator awards from the Wellcome Trust and the European Research Council.  She has also received funding from the UKRI, the Royal Society, the Leverhulme Trust, the Emily and Georg von Opel Foundation and the Oxford Martin School. She and Dr. Craig Thompson have developed a novel method for producing a universal influenza vaccine (derived from a mathematical model) and this has now been licensed and is going through early testing. She does not hold any consultancy contracts or stock shares in any commercial company. 

Other Responses

Critics of the declaration say the event where it was signed was hosted by the American Institute for Economic Research, a conservative free-market think tank located in Great Barrington, and is politically motivated.

“From a public health and ethical viewpoint, the fact that the Great Barrington Declaration is now the Trump administration’s official policy is deeply troubling,” Dr. Gavin Yamey, a physician and professor of global health and public policy at Duke University, wrote October 14 in TIME. He says this “letting the virus rip” approach is “dangerous and inhumane.”

The Infectious Diseases Society of America issued a statement denouncing the Great Barrington Declaration, calling the herd immunity strategy to COVID-19 “inappropriate, irresponsible, and ill-informed.”

The Director-General of the World Health Organization said during an October 12 media briefing: “Never in the history of public health has herd immunity been used as a strategy for responding to an outbreak, let alone a pandemic. It is scientifically and ethically problematic.”

The Great Barrington Declaration signers aren’t backing down, and continue to defend their positions.

The authors also acknowledge that many online signatures are not actual doctors or experts in this field.

Vancouver, WA — Clark County Public Health said today that “COVID-19 is spreading throughout our community at an alarming pace.” This week, the health department said the COVID-19 activity rate increased to more than 171 cases per 100,000 people over 14 days.

Disease transmission is occurring at an accelerated pace across the state, as well.

“As the holidays near, we’re concerned our case counts will continue to rise as people attend gatherings and spend more time indoors,” the health department said in a statement.

Health guidelines to disrupt this transmission in our community by taking simple steps to slow the spread of COVID-19 include the following:

  • Wear a face covering anytime you’re around people you don’t live with (even friends and family).
  • Maintain physical distancing.
  • Stay home as much as possible.
  • Limit the number, size and frequency of gatherings – and only attend gatherings that are essential.
  • Wash your hands frequently.
  • Stay home if you’re sick.

Tuesday COVID-19 update

  • 166 new cases (5,783 cases to date)
  • 4 new deaths (77 to date)
  • 349 active cases
  • Rate is 171.55 cases per 100,000 (up from 131.42 cases per 100,000 last week)
  • 45 COVID-19 patients hospitalized
  • 8 persons under investigation (PUIs) for COVID-19 hospitalized
COVID-19
www.artfuljuxtaposition.com

The four deaths we’re reporting today are as follows:

  • Man in his 70s with no underlying health conditions
  • Man 80+ years old with underlying health conditions
  • Man in his 70s with no underlying health conditions
  • Woman in her 70s with underlying health conditions

The health department also put out this reminder about active cases: This reflects the number of confirmed cases who are currently in their isolation period. For most people, isolation is based on when symptoms began, not when they received the positive test result. Some individuals learn they are COVID-19 positive and only have a few days of isolation remaining.

Portland, Ore. – Aaron Adams’ plant-based “beneficial bacteria emporium” known as Fermenter has moved from its original location and taken over the Farm Spirit space at 1403 SE Belmont St., streamlining both restaurant concepts into a single location. The converted space is now open for lunch, dinner, and Saturday brunch for take-out and delivery.

In its new 1,000 square-foot home, Fermenter continues its celebration of all things probiotic created in small batches and sourced from within 105 miles of Portland. The former Farm Spirit dining room has been converted into a delicatessen setting, offering guests soups, sandwiches, bowls, salads, provisions and sides ready to eat or to take out and prepare at home. 

Adams’ continues to make tempeh a focal point, serving it seared and warm in his dishes or selling it separately for cooking at home. Over 2020, he has broadened his vegan charcuterie, perfecting a tempeh bacon. House-made kefir, kombucha and ginger beer made popular with the temperance pairing at Farm Spirit dinners are available by the glass or in to-go growlers. Adams has also expanded Fermenter’s pantry provisions, stocking a refrigerated case with vegetable krauts, hot sauces, nut-based spreads, and plant-based cheeses. On Saturday mornings starting at 11:00 a.m., the menu expands to include breakfast items such as sweet and savory tartines, breakfast bowls and Proud Mary batch-brew coffee. 

“I opened Portobello in a coffee shop as a pop-up, so this is a very full circle moment for me right now,” says Adams, noting that this is the first time Fermenter or Farm Spirit will be serving coffee in its five-year history. “My goal is to be an oasis for the neighborhood and where people can pop in, say hi, and grab a nourishing bite to go. Preserving our sense of community is tremendously important right now.”

For the curious customer looking for a new culinary project, Adams is offering take-home kits for pickling, kraut- and kombucha-making, complete with instructions, crocks, and starter spores.

While letting go of the original tiny 660 square-foot space on SE Morrison St. connotes the end of a chapter in Farm Spirit’s history, Adams does plan to hold coursed dinners as soon as it is safe to do so. “Obviously there are a lot of external factors that would need to be addressed, but we’re looking forward to welcoming our Farm Spirit diners back as soon as we possibly can,” he says.

In the meantime, Adams has installed covered heated seating on SE 14th Street. Fermenter is open Wednesday to Saturday 11:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.

Fermenter/Farm Spirit

Located at 1403 SE Belmont St. in in Portland, Ore., Fermenter and Farm Spirit serve plant-based, locally-sourced cuisine from the farms, fields and forests of the Cascadia region. Farm Spirit was twice recognized in 2019 for sustainability with the Good Food 100 Restaurants List and Zero Foodprint List.

Here is their website: https://www.restaurantji.com/or/portland/fermenter-/

Fermenter
Photos by Dina Avila.

Camas, WA — Lara Blair Photography in downtown Camas is offering limited Holiday Sparkle & Wonder session to capture the spirit and joy of the season.

Blair answers some questions about this fun, new project.

What is a Sparkle & Wonder session?

For 45 minutes, we capture your family in a choice of holiday sets (super creative…think “Target ad”) and also on a plain white backdrop. We want you to have some original holiday images for your cards and social media, but we also feel everyone should have up-to-date, fun family images to display at home.

When are the sessions?

We are shooting only a handful in November. We are providing evening appointments (a rarity at our studio) so everyone can make it. We’re booking now—first come, first booked.

What’s the investment?

This session is $250, a savings of $100 from our usual sessions. Our portrait design specialist will walk you through our products (including fabulous holiday cards!). With a $600 order, you receive 25 complimentary cards.

Call 360.980.2413 or email [email protected] to schedule your session today!

Blair
www.artfuljuxtaposition.com

Camas Author Seth Sjostrom released his latest book, The Tree Farm, a holiday novel, on November 1st. 

When the Shepherd family loses everything right before the holidays, they find joy in what matters most, rekindling fading Christmas traditions for themselves and for their town. They find that like trees, Christmas miracles come in all shapes and sizes.

“I wanted to write a story the depicts the struggle that a lot of families have during the holiday season. While they strive create the ‘perfect’ Christmas for their family, there is a lot more to the season than presents and an elaborate meal,” Sjostrom shares.

In the Tree Farm, the Shepherd family struggles to keep up with bills and maintain a roof over their heads never mind fashion a magazine-worthy holiday. A local tree farm with struggles of its own, presents as a safe haven for the Shepherd family. Forced to live simply, they discover a great gift, the magic of the holiday is accessible to all, regardless of material offerings.

A serial entrepreneur, adventurer and author, The Tree Farm, is Sjostrom’s ninth novel. The romances Finding Christmas, The Nativity and Back to Carolina along with the thrillers Blood in the Snow, Blood in the Water, Blood in the Sand, Penance, and recently released paranormal thriller Dark Chase were his first books published. All of Seth’s books are available anywhere books are sold. 

For more information regarding Seth or his books, visit www.sethsjostrom.com.  

Sjostrom
Author Seth Sjostrom.

Camas, WA — Champ Pizza officially opened its third Clark County restaurant today in Camas at Lacamas Center on 3rd Avenue next to Dollar Tree.

”We’re pretty excited about this,” said managing parter, Tyson Cook. “This opportunity came pretty quickly and we jumped on it.”

Champ Pizza Camas is located in the former Little Caesar’s footprint, and they’re ready to go. Champ Pizza makes a quality pizza that’s ready fast with delivery and pickup options.

Hours:

  • 11-9 Sunday – Thursday
  • 11-10 Friday and Saturday

“We use 100 percent whole mozzarella cheese, we make dough daily made with buttermilk and Parmesan,” Cook said. “We bring in all our produce and slice it in house. We also offer premium meats — ham, pepperoni, sausage, bacon, etc. We don’t cut corners there. We pride ourselves on our service, we believe a customer deserves a quality pizza every time. We can deliver and be ready just as quickly as the competition. We will serve all of Camas and Washougal.”

And, they’re ready to get to know you. 

“We really want to be involved with the community and will continue our Athlete of the Month program,” Cook said. ”We will also give many teens an opportunity to have a good job.” 

Champ
Making dough.

Washougal WA — A student’s classroom can be almost anywhere during this time of remote learning.  For second grade students Marina Guevara, Julie Taie and Lisa Haskin at Gause Elementary, their field science assignment took them out into the world to look for and study signs of erosion.

“We began the year by thinking about what it looks like to be a scientist,” said Guevara.  “We felt that this unit provided good opportunities to ‘unplug’ and have students apply what they are learning.” 

Once they received permission to go outdoors, students were challenged to collect and examine rocks and take a photo or draw a picture of a nearby body of water to identify possible signs of erosion. 

The lesson included looking closely at phenomena happening at a beach in Northcove, WA, nicknamed “Washaway Beach” due to erosion.

“We are continuing to read to learn more about rivers, rocks, beaches, and oceans to help us understand what is happening and possible solutions once we do understand,” said Taie.

According to Guevara, taking this time away from the computer screen gives students a needed change of pace.

“We could see students, and even families, excited and engaged in this project,” she said.  “I think it’s powerful that they found these examples on their own. It is also exciting that this current distance learning situation allows us to collect a variety of responses and data to study.”

“If examples were provided in the classroom or in a group, all the students would see the same thing,” said Haskin. “This way we have different sets of eyes and ears finding evidence of erosion in a variety of places and making observations to share with the class.”

One of the biggest challenges with distance learning for all teachers is fostering connections.

“Creating relationships comes first for me,” said Guevara. “I want my students to know I am there for them and that I care about them.  Being behind a screen is a whole different ball game. Connections can be difficult to foster via technology.” 

But projects like this provide for moments of connection as they show their learning and share what they have seen. Students were connecting with the shared photos saying things like, “I know that place! I’ve been there!” 

“The pictures submitted by students not only provide different data points but also included some special moments shared by families exploring together,” said Guevara. “We were lucky that we had some nice sunny days to work with too!”   

Guevara says she sees evidence of resilience in her class of seven and eight-year-olds every day. 

“The end of last school year and the beginning of this one has been filled with challenges and growing pains,” she admits. “But I feel like we are really getting the hang of it. We have found a rhythm. Part of our learning mantra this year is ‘I’m here to grow every day,’ and I see our students embody that in how they approach their learning, how they communicate with me and with peers, and even how they advocate for themselves through technology.”

“Learning and communicating through screens can be daunting but we are still interacting with our students and they are showing a keen desire to learn despite the challenges,” Guevara said.  “We are so proud of them.”

Students
Having a fun day.

Naturopathic physicians (NDs) go to medical school like their MD colleagues. The first two years of school follow the same track, with classes in basic science. Biochemistry, anatomy (including cadaver lab…ughh), physiology, and so on. You can’t change basic science no matter what medical philosophy you study. The last two years are where we diverge.  Yes, we learn Pharmacology and all the other ologies, and we can prescribe drugs in licensed states.  However, in their last 2 years, MD students enter a series of hospital-based specialty rotations (trauma surgery, emergency med, pediatrics, etc) while ND students rotate through outpatient primary care settings.  The last two years of ND education also include time spent learning the modalities that set us apart: botanical medicine, homeopathy, physical medicine, nutrition, motivational counseling, and so on. During this time, we are also honing our skills as primary care providers, managing patients under the supervision of licensed and experienced NDs.  In the primary care setting, we learn continuity of care as we see patients multiple times and see the outcome of our treatments.  MD training in hospital and specialty rotations, for the most part, do not follow their patients.  It is usually a one and done. When ND’s graduate, we pass our clinical boards, we are fully licensable as primary care provider physicians. But just like your MD, we are not oncologists without further training.

Becoming a naturopathic oncologist is a rigorous process.  In order to qualify to sit for the naturopathic oncology boards, one must complete a two-year hospital-based residency or be in practice for at least 5 years, with the last two years consisting of an 80% or greater load of cancer patients. At this time, I am in year 4 of supervising and training Dr. Jessica Campbell so she can sit for the Oncology board exam.  I did my residency at Cancer Treatment Centers of America in Tulsa Ok.  As part of approval process, a number of case studies must be submitted and approved by the American Board of Naturopathic Oncology (ABNO) which is the regulatory board. These case submissions are a screening process to be sure you are following safe and well-studied protocols.  Once you have been approved by ABNO, then you may sit for the board exam.  Dr. Campbell will be sitting for the oncology boards in 2021. The board exam itself is extremely demanding and requires that the applicant know the minutia of all the standard of care treatments for cancer and how they interact with the tools of naturopathic medicine. This is important because different cancer treatments work through different biochemistry and physiologic pathways, have different  half-life, and different sided effect profiles.  It is important to understand these intricacies of standard of care before using herbs and supplements, as many can interfere with these pathways, delay or speed up clearance of the drugs and make side effects worse.  This is why it is absolutely critical that cancer patients seek out naturopathic doctors who are specifically trained, and ideally board certified, in naturopathic oncology.  Again, NDs emerge from medical school trained for primary care.  Cancer patients need to work with a specialist.  Just as you would not rely on your primary care MD to prescribe your chemotherapy, radiation or perform surgery, you should not rely on a general practice ND to co-manage your cancer care. Training matters.

Police
www.resultsfitnesstraining.com

At our clinic, we specialize in oncology.  While we do see some patients who do not have cancer, especially family members of cancer patients, the vast majority of our patients are either recently diagnosed and in treatment or have a history of cancer.  They may or may not be in remission.  We are equipped to help all cancer patients, working collaboratively with their conventional oncology team, at any stage of the journey.  We follow a three pronged approach.  (see blog on the three-pronged approach) If you or someone you know has been diagnosed with cancer, or have a family hx of cancer and are seeking extra support, please call our clinic today to make an appointment.  We have many tools in our toolbox, and we teach our patients how to regain control as they navigate their illness. No one wants a diagnosis of cancer, but once the diagnosis has happened, one can choose to be part of the process and take control of their situation.  Naturopathic oncology is about taking back control of your health, guided by experts who have dedicated their lives to helping cancer patients thrive. It is vitally important if you are going to uses supplements and herbs during your cancer care  that you get guidance from those of us that are formally trained in interactions, and short- and long-term side effects.  It is very dangerous to go to Dr. Google and self-prescribe and not tell your oncologist what you are doing. We are trained to help you to help yourself. At this time there are 123 ND’s in the United States and Canada that have passed the Naturopathic Oncology board exams and are Fellows of the American Board of Naturopathic Oncology (FABNO).

Written by Cynthia Bye, ND, FABNO
Board certified in Naturopathic Medicine

www.cynthiabye.com

Vancouver, WA — Clark County Public Health released their weekend report today stating another 124 people have tested positive for COVID-19 – for an average of about 41 new cases per day (Fri-Sun). However, the department has removed 12 previously counted cases from the county total.

“During our data reconciliation process, we discovered 12 cases among people who live in another county and whose cases have been transferred to the health departments in those counties,” the department said in a statement. “With those changes, a total of 4,230 Clark County residents have tested positive for COVID-19 to date.“

Currently, Clark County has 150 active COVID-19 cases. As a reminder, the number of active cases reflects the number of confirmed cases who are currently in their isolation period. For most people, isolation is based on when symptoms began, not when they received the positive test result. Some individuals learn they are COVID-19 positive and only have a few days of isolation remaining.

There are 19 COVID-19 patients and nine persons under investigation (PUIs) for COVID-19 hospitalized. Additional hospital data is available on our website, such as the percent of hospital beds occupied and percent of beds occupied by COVID-19 patients and PUIs. The health department has also added data on the percent of ICU beds currently occupied. For more information, visit: https://www.clark.wa.gov/public-health/novel-coronavirus

COVID-19
www.electlarryhoff.com

Close Contact Guidance

If you were in close contact with someone who tested positive for COVID-19, please stay home.

“Even if you feel OK, you may still be infected and be able to spread the virus to others,” advises the health department. “We ask all close contacts who were around the person who tested positive – going back two days before their symptoms began – to stay home for 14 days from their last exposure.“

Close contacts are classified as follows:

  • Were within 6ft of the sick person for more than 15 minutes
  • Were near the sick person’s coughs or sneezes
  • Live in the same home as the sick person
  • Cared for the sick person

If during the Public Health case investigation you are identified as a close contact to someone who tests positive, you can expect a call from an attending nurse. But you don’t have to wait to hear from If you know you were exposed, help slow the spread of the virus by staying home.

This handout has more information for those who may have been exposed to someone with COVID-19: https://clark.wa.gov/sites/default/files/dept/files/public-health/novel_coronavirus/CCPH_COVID-19_Exposed_%28English%29.pdf