Unite! Washougal Youth Coalition invite youth and their parents to join in planting red tulips and tying red ribbons around downtown Washougal this coming Saturday, October 20th, in preparation for Red Ribbon Week.

Washougal Mayor, Molly Coston, proclaimed October 23 – 31, 2018 as Red Ribbon Week in the city of Washougal, Washington. This proclamation was declared at the September 8th City Council Meeting. All citizens of Washougal are urged to join in special observance of Red Ribbon Week. (Official Proclamation included below).

Members of the Unite! Washougal Youth Coalition are “Planting the Promise” to keep Washougal drug free! Planting red tulips in the fall is a great way to participate in Red Ribbon Week. In the Spring the red tulips will serve as a reminder to Washougal residents that we live, work, and play in a beautiful, healthy and drug free community!

Participants need to complete a youth or adult waiver and must be turned in either to the City of Washougal or Deb Connors no later than 1pm on Friday October 19th.

What: Unite! Washougal Youth Coalition Community Project for Red Ribbon Week (planting red tulips and tying red ribbons)  *Must complete a waiver

When: Saturday, October 20th from 8:30am – 10:30am

Where: Downtown Washougal (meeting in front of Washougal Coffee Company – 1700 Main St #130, Washougal, WA 98671)

Who: Washougal youth, their parents, and other interested community members (those under 18 years of age will need to have a completed permission form and volunteer waiver form)

Contact: Deborah Connors, Unite! Washougal CPWI Coordinator, deborahconnors@unitewashougal.org or 360-713-1232

Washougal, WA — The 2018 Arts Ambassador Scholarship recipients were honored at the recent Enspire Arts Celebration Gala, which was held Saturday at the Black Pearl. The Arts Ambassador Scholarship Program is a newly established program offering $500 scholarships towards instruction in any art form and available for students in grades 6-12 throughout Clark County.

Each recipient of a scholarship will provide an arts based community gift to serve the residents of Clark County. Enspire Arts sought students dedicated to their craft, having a strong desire to keep learning and a motivation to enrich the lives of others. Some students have already had several years of study and some are just beginning their formal instruction. Yet, in all of them there is potential to make a positive and meaningful contribution to the community of Clark County.

Aaron Greene is a senior at Union High School and his community gift will be creating a Peer to Peer String Instruction Program to support the school’s orchestra, as well as provide free lessons to those that may otherwise not have access.  In its first year, the program will have 4 tutors, serving 10 students.

Zoe Hill is an 8th grade student at Jemtegaard Middle School and her community gift will be Reaching Others Through Art.  Zoe will be creating a series of comic drawings highlighting the mental dialogue associated with certain mental conditions. This artwork has the potential to open the doors for discussion with local youth and the challenges they are facing.

Zayah Shore is a 7th grade student at Liberty Middle School and her community gift will be Sharing the Love of Music.  Zayah is zealous to encourage young students to give music a try. She plans to visit elementary classrooms to share what it’s like to learn a new instrument and to encourage kids not to be a afraid of a challenge.  

Zachary Lipinski is a junior at Heritage High School and his community gift will be Connecting with Others Through Music.  Zachary’s love of music has drawn him to want to become an orchestra teacher. Zachary will be providing free public music performances around Clark County.

Cassidy Watson is a junior at Camas High School and her community gift will be The Joy of Dance.  Cassidy is a talented young dancer and is excited at the opportunity to share her joy of dance with others.  Cassidy will be offering three contemporary dance workshops to youth around Clark County.

For more information regarding Enspire Arts, their programs, ways to get involved and making a donation, please see www.enspirearts.org

The 2019 Arts Ambassador Scholarship application period will open March 2019.

Ambassado

From left: Aaron Greene, Zayah Shore, Cassidy Watson, Zoe Hill, and Zachary Lipinski.

Camas, WA — During this past weekend’s Camas Wellness Festival, event organizers held a 90-minute panel called “Your Teen’s Secret Life at School and Outside Your Home” in which they addressed questions about social media addiction, online bullying, effects of technology in the classroom, and when to give a child a smart phone.

Panel members Kimberly Berry, Alan Chan, and Jennifer Ireland answered questions. Berry is the founder of Being UnNormal, a consulting and advocacy group for mental health issues. Chan has worked in Clark County for six years providing services to at-risk youth with chronic and complex mental health needs. Ireland has a Master’s degree in K-12 Special Education, and is a 22-year veteran public school teacher (at Skyridge Middle School).

We report their responses to each question.

Question: Can social media be addictive?

Berry: “Yes, of course, anything can be addictive. We know that teens are spending a lot of time on their phones. Teens that spend five hours or more a day on their smart phones are more prone to be depressed. Ten percent of teens check their phone at night at least ten times per night. Chances are they’re checking it when you don’t realize it.”

Chan: “In my experience, the social media and cell phone usage is a huge conflict in their lives. The phones and social media become a social status among kids.”

Ireland: “Addiction comes with all the time children are spending on these devices. Self-esteem and confidence relies upon what they see on social media. It’s problematic.”

Question: How does social media affect mental health?

Berry: “We see the escalation of bullying being carried into the home. It also leads to isolation.
They start to get anxious about not measuring up to false standards.”

Chan: “I think the concern I have with social media is that it creates a false reality. Often times we only see all the great things. You feel like you’re missing out. It’s the fear of missing out. You feel like you’re different, like you can’t connect, like you’re a bit of an outcast.”

Ireland: “We can’t shelter them completely from it. We make sure we limit how they use social media, and monitor their usage. Parents should be on all the accounts. We have to be with them step by step, and start them with training wheels. Instagram is safer than some of the others. On Snapchat, things disappear. As a parent, look at their posts together. Have conversations with your children about the posts.

“Social media is a photo album of all the good things in life, and doesn’t represent all the reality, like the negatives and struggles. You can’t put it away, it’s everywhere now. Talk to your child about it. It’s for their health.”

Chan: “Kids have become so reliant and dependent on social media to connect with friends that it’s hard to put away.”

Berry: “I encourage parents to look beyond posts, and to look at DM’s and IM’s. Dig into social media accounts. There is often a lot of stuff happening on the back end. The social media impact on young girls is they are comparing themselves, which is creating more eating disorders. Remember that our girls are comparing themselves to the unattainable. As parents, we have control over social media, so take control of that. You are empowered.”

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COME VISIT US IN DOWNTOWN CAMAS!

Question: What is online bullying?

Berry: “People send negative messages to our kids, and it’s coming from other kids. Half of teens have reported they’ve been bullied online. Twenty-five percent of those reports are coming through their cell phones. One in five children get sexual messages.

“Eighty percent of teens use cell phones regularly. The phone is always with you. It’s in your house. Your house is supposed to be a safe place, but now the bear is everywhere. You’re constantly feeling anxious. It’s really problematic because it is destroying our children’s hearts and hope. We need to responsibly reduce access. Ask your kids about whether they’ve been bullied at school.”

Ireland: “If you ask your child the R’s of bullying they will you. It happens in the halls and in the lunchroom, but the online bullying is becoming more prevalent. The kids have gotten really good at doing this in the school setting.”

Question: In general, how has school life changed in the last 10 years?

Ireland: “I feel like I’ve been in school my whole, as a student and teacher (she teaches 6th grade).
It’s changed drastically, and the big shift is the increased anxiety and mental health.
It’s a whole different ball of yarn with increases in standardized testing. As a kid, I don’t remember hearing about my results, and now these standardized tests are stressing kids out. She’s concerned about the pressure. Some kids might need five years to graduate from high school, and they shouldn’t be counted less or as not being successful. The stress of all that goes back into the education system. The teacher success is being tied to those scores. They’ve cut out music, art and recess in the middle schools. They don’t get to move, they don’t get to be outside. All those coupled with social media is causing problems. Lack of food and sleep contribute to their pressures and stresses.

“Too many parents aren’t happy with less than a 3.5 GPA. They get upset when a child gets 96% on a math test. Parents put unrealistic expectations on their kids, and that shows up in the classroom. What can we do to make good enough good enough?”

Secret

Your Teen’s Secret Life Panel spent 90 minutes discussing a variety of mental health issues.

Question: How as parents can we manage the academic stress they’re facing?

Ireland: “Talk to your kids. Talk to them about how to manage their time. Talk about their schedule and make sure they schedule in down time. Exercise and fitness are key. Cultivate friendships that aren’t online friendships. Ask what they’re going to do when they hang out.

“Make sure your child knows they need to make good, positive connections with teachers or counselors. Parents need to reach out to their teachers.”

Chan: “People learn in different ways. Be attuned to barriers and challenges that kids have.”

Berry: “We can’t blame our teachers. We need to approach teachers as allies, and not obstacles.”

Ireland: “Kids need to have chores. It seems so little, but having a job contributes to making a home run more efficiently. Praise them for the work they do. The satisfaction of a job well done is something many kids don’t have today.”

Question: At what age is a smartphone appropriate?

Ireland: “13 or older. It seems to be a middle school milestone. It’s better for their health to wait until 8th or 9th grade. It’s a major distraction at middle school and it’s not healthy for them. Too many 6th graders have cell phones. Sixth graders don’t need smartphones. There are different types of phones you can get. Give them a simpler phone at first and see how they take care of it.”

Berry: “Phones are a status symbol. It’s an intentional projection coming from home. It creates problems in the schools. Find out how do they feel when they’re away from the phone from an extended period of time.”

Teachers in the room agreed that smartphones for kids under 13 isn’t a good idea, and that it leads to more kids leading a secret life that parents aren’t aware of.

To learn more, visit www.CamasWellnessFestival.com

Welcome to our Weekly Food + Dining Guide! Grains of Wrath is introducing a new Fall menu, with some great lunch items and entrees. Here’s just a sampling of their new Fall seasonal offerings:

  • Manilla Clams (featured image): Pacific NW clams, GOW beer, garlic, parsley. Served with toasted baguette.
  • Marrow Poutine: Half bone marrow, fries, Face Rock cheese curds.
  • Nachos: House tortilla chips, red salsa, aji sauce, cotija, cilantro and onion.
  • Fried Chicken Sando: It’s back with a few tweaks. Brioche bun, breast, Tillamook smoked cheddar, pickles, crystal aioli, lettuce.
  • Impossible Burger (vegan): A special vegan patty, lettuce, tomato jam, red onion, pickles.
  • Muffaletta: Demi baquette, salami, mortadella, provolone picante, Mama Lil’s & Castelvetrano olive-pepper relish
  • Crispy Brussel Sprouts: scallions, cilantro, peanuts, mint, Thai dressing.

Hours: Monday-Thursday, 11 am-10 pm; Friday-Saturday, 11 am-12 am; Sunday, 11 am-9 pm; Happy hour is 3-6 weekdays. They are located at 230 NE 5th Ave. Camas, WA 98607

Phone: 360-210-5717

Visit: www.gowbeer.com

FEAST @316 —Downtown Camas

Dining

Charcuterie Board.

Located in the heart of historic Downtown Camas, Washington, Feast @316 offers one of the best dining experiences in the Northwest with Fresh Seafood, Certified Angus Beef, Craft Cocktails, and Signature Wines. Located in Downtown Camas at 316 NE Dallas St

Hours: Monday-Thursday, 11:30 am-9 pm; Friday + Saturday, 11:30 am-10 pm; Sunday, 4-9 pm; Happy Hour, Monday-Friday 3-5 pm.

Phone: 360-210-7498

Visit: www.CamasFeast316.com

 

CAFFE PICCOLO — Downtown Camas

Dining

Golden Milk Latte.

Come try the Golden Milk Latte at Caffe Piccolo! It’s made with hemp milk. This creaming beverage has turmeric, cinnamon, ginger, cardamom, and black pepper! Each day, you can come try a new soup for lunch, along with one of our great espressos, lattes and speciality coffee drinks — featuring Caffe Umbria. For breakfast or brunch, we have delicious breakfast sandwiches and panini’s. Come to relax, unwind, or open your laptop and have a remote office. People love to meet her socially or for casual business meetings. We’d love to see you. 400 Northeast Fourth Avenue, Camas, WA, at the corner of Fourth & Cedar

Hours: Open Monday – Friday 7 am – 5 pm, Saturday 8 am – 4 pm, Sunday 9 am – 3 pm

Phone: 360-834-7044

Visit: www.caffe-piccolo.com

NUESTRA MESA — Downtown Camas

Dining

A great place to relax.

Join us for Live Acoustic Music, delicious cocktails, and Mexican fare, every Wednesday night from 6:30-8:30pm!

Located at 228 NE 4th Avenue, in Downtown Camas, Mesa offers gourmet Mexican cuisine. It’s a family friendly location.

Hours: Monday-Thursday, 11:30 am-9 pm; Friday + Saturday, 11:30 am-10 pm; Sundays, 10 am-3 pm (Brunch only).

Phone: 360-210-5311

Visit: www.NuestraMesa.com

NAVIDI’S OLIVE OIL & VINEGARS — Downtown Camas

Dining

Blood Orange Olive Oil and Cranberry Pear Balsamic Vinegar.

Navidi’s has a long tradition of providing the best olive oils, vinegars, speciality salts and seasonings to make your meals extraordinary. Visit us today to sample our fabulous oils and vinegars, which also make great gifts. 322 NE Cedar Street, Camas, WA 98607

Hours: Monday thru Saturday 11 am – 6 pm and Sunday noon – 5 pm.

Phone: 360-210-5921

Visit: www.navidioiols.net

HANA KOREAN — Downtown Camas

Dining

Bi Bim Bop.

For those who know and appreciate Korean food, Hana is the real deal. Hana offers Korean, teriyaki, noodles, combinations, and sides at reasonable prices. A customer favorite is the Bi Bim Bop (featured above), as well as the Bul-Go-Gi, which is thinly sliced marinated beef, stir-fried vegetables, and steamed rice. Portion sizes are generous. Located in the heart of Downtown Camas at 412 NE 4th Ave.

Hours: Monday-Saturday, 11 am-8:30 pm

Phone: 360-833-9111

 

THE HAMMOND KITCHEN & CRAFT BAR — Downtown Camas

Schedule your private holiday event at The Hammond Kitchen and Craft Bar today! It’s a great location to celebrate and spend time with your business colleagues, friend, and family members. Call today for pricing and availability.

Located at 4857 NW Lake Road, #200, Camas, WA 98607.

Hours: Monday-Thursday, 11:00 am-9 pm; Friday, 11:00 am-10 pm; Saturday, 10:30 am-10 pm; Sunday, 10:30-10 pm; Social Hour, Monday-Friday 4-6 pm, plus Saturday + Sunday, 3-6 pm.

Phone: 360-954-5620

Visit: www.TheHammondKitchenandCraftBar.com

Dining

Private Dining Room at The Hammond.

 

TOMMY O’s — in Downtown Vancouver

Enjoy our great restaurant in Downtown Vancouver!

One of the best Happy Hour and Weekend Brunch destinations in Vancouver, they also offer a full Sushi menu with creative and delicious options. For lunch and dinner, choose from selections like Macadamia Crusted Halibut, Kona Coffee Rubbed Flat Iron Steak, or Island style cuisine like Teriyaki Chicken, Kalbi Ribs, and Coconut Shrimp. We also offer many gluten-free and vegetarian options. Located at 801 Washington St Vancouver, WA.

Hours: Brunch, Saturday-Sunday, 9 am-noon; Lunch, Daily 11 am-4 pm; Dinner, Daily 4-9 pm; Aloha Hour, 3-6 pm

Lounge Hours: Monday-Thursday, 3 pm-6 pm; Friday-Saturday, 3 pm-11 pm; Sundays

Phone: 360-694-5107

Visit: www.tommyosaloha.com

 

HEY JACK, — Downtown Camas

Dining

A great events location!

Events! We host them! Hey Jack is now available for your private party, holiday bash, wedding shower, or Corporate function. There’s never a room fee, we can tailor-make your menu to meet just about any budget, and we can comfortably fit up to 30 people for seated dinner, or 45 people for a stand-up mixer. Special discounts given to Monday or Tuesday events. Email: don@heyjackkitchen.com for more information or to reserve your date.

Speaking of events, we’re planning on a 5-course wine dinner featuring the wines of France, Italy, and Spain. We’re working on a special menu devoted to food and wine pairing and he exploration of Old World Wines for any level of wine knowledge. All we ask is you have fun and bring an appetite. Stay tuned to Facebook and Instagram for more information.

Location: 401 NE 4th Ave, Camas WA 98607
Reservations Call: (306)954-5053

Families are always looking for easy, healthy recipes, and you can’t go wrong with Navidi’s Wild Mushroom Risotto.

Ingredients

  • 8 cups canned low-salt chicken broth
  • 1/2 ounce dried porcini mushrooms
  • 1/4 cup unsalted butter
  • 2 tablespoons Navidi’s Wild Mushroom and Sage Olive Oil
  • 2 cups finely chopped onions
  • 10 ounces white mushrooms, finely chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 1/2 cups Arborio rice or short-grain white rice
  • 2/3 cup dry white wine
  • 3/4 cup frozen peas, thawed
  • 2/3 cup grated Parmesan
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper, optional
Navidi’s

Mushroom risotto with parsley  – a healthy vegetarian food.

Directions

Bring the broth to a simmer in a heavy medium saucepan. Add the porcini mushrooms. Set aside until the mushrooms are tender, about 5 minutes. Keep the broth warm over very low heat. Melt the butter in a heavy large saucepan over medium heat. Add olive oil. Add the onions and sauté until tender, about 8 minutes. Add the white mushrooms and garlic. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the porcini mushrooms to a cutting board.

Hill

http://tvc.org/meet-jen

Finely chop the mushrooms and add to the saucepan. Sauté until the mushrooms are tender and the juices evaporate, about five minutes. Stir in the rice and let it toast for a few minutes. Add the wine; cook until the liquid is absorbed, stirring often, about two minutes. Add 1 cup of hot broth; simmer over medium-low heat until the liquid is absorbed, stirring often, about three minutes. Continue to cook until the rice is just tender and the mixture is creamy, adding more broth by capfuls and stirring often, about 28 minutes (the rice will absorb 6-8 cups of broth). Stir in the peas. Mix in the Parmesan. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Finish with a drizzle of Navidi’s Wild Mushroom and Sage olive oil.

Navidi’s is located in Downtown Camas.

Hours: Monday thru Saturday 11 am – 6 pm and Sunday noon – 5 pm.

Phone: 360-210-5921

Visit: www.navidioiols.net

Meet Joshua W. Turner. Singer. Songwriter. Musician. Producer. Entrepreneur.

The Tacoma, WA artist is a busy man who’s actively promoting his new debut EP album, “BE OK,” which has catchy hooks, heartfelt lyrics, and colorful, diverse songwriting imagery.

“It’s an enticing story of love, hope, and the longing desire to get up and change,” says Turner. “It was written, recorded and produced by myself over a year span and features guest vocals from both my sister-in-law, Savannah Turner, and my beautiful wife, Erin Turner.”

This specific album is a collection of songs Turner wrote more than a decade ago, and a few written within the last year.

“It’s a compilation of doing music for 13 years, and picking songs that represent me as a solo artist,” said Turner. “This is my first solo album I’ve put out.”

Call 360.696.9877

A fiercely independent man, Turner has chosen Bandcamp.com to his release “Be OK” because it gives him more autonomy.

“Bandcamp is a platform to release an album on your own terms, you can determine pricing and do it more your way,” Turner said. “It’s not as popular but it’s a good starting point to have an album presented in its entirety.”

“Be OK” can be streamed and/or downloaded through this link:
http://joshuawturner.bandcamp.com/album/be-ok

Getting the word out to Music Supervisors is key as he’s chosen the sync licensing route to generate income. It’s not easy, but it works for Turner, and other artists like him. Sync licensing enlists Music Supervisors to set moods for various media productions, and it requires extensive research to know how to do it right.

Turner said his genre is singer-songwriter, which has the feel of one man with a guitar speaking his heart. The music really sets a tone, a mood.

“It has country aspects woven into it, and part of it is my style, and part of it is to make the songs more diverse for sync licensing opportunities,” he said. “I put all my history into one album. “This was a test for me because I needed to figure out how to produce music. The album was released August 30, and it’s gotten some interest. It’s been sent to music supervisors and it’s gaining traction.”

Background

“I got started in my bedroom,” he said. “I grew up on Whidbey Island and I just decided I wanted to sing, and was taught I could develop my voice and going to voice lessons. So, for two years I learned on my own, and then went to Berkeley College of Music in Boston, and I got in and I just started learning how to sing, and while I was there, I was awarded the Berkeley Achievement Scholarship.”

“Then, after Berkeley I went to Musicians Institute in Hollywood to study guitar. I was doing rock music then, and I was in the genre of Smashing Pumpkins meets Gun’s and Roses. I caught up with people who were developing a rock band. We went to red carpets featuring Richie Sambora.”

As time passed, Turner became disheartened and walked away from Los Angeles — and walked away from music. In time, he met his wife and got a normal preschool job teaching music.

“Then I started realizing I wanted to keep making music,” Turner said. “What I had to do was take on the responsibility of being the sole provider, which led me back to music. I opened a music coaching school, where I train singers to be confident about themselves. Confidence issues hold people back in music. I recognize that I have to do several streams of income to support my family. You have to be creative.”

Vancouver, WA — With help from the Vancouver Rotary Foundation and a Swiss-funded school, Navraj Lamichhane, or “Raj,” of Nepal, is living his dream, and plans use his education to improve the quality of life in his native country.

After completing two years of college in Nepal, Raj arrived in Vancouver nearly three years ago to continue his studies at Washington State University (WSU) Vancouver where he recently earned a Business Administration Degree with a certificate in professional sales.

“I was the scholarship recipient from the Vancouver Rotary Foundation, and was paid through grants and other scholarships, and directly from WSU,” said Raj. “I got a sponsor from Switzerland, and she helped me through the first semester. Her name is Birgit Krneta, with Bright Horizons Children’s school in Nepal, which is a Swiss-funded school, and everyone has a sponsor. I had her as my sponsor and she paid for my education and she paid for my first semester at WSU Vancouver. After that, I was able to get the remaining funds.”

Raj also received support from Beverly Questad, who assisted with room and board. The two originally met in Nepal during a teaching abroad program. Questad, a Skyview High School teacher, traveled to Nepal to teach and train.

“I was planning to come to America at that time, and we started talking and she really liked my drive,” said Raj. “She offered free room and board, which is close to the WSU Vancouver campus. When I came here I got full scholarships, and that’s how I was able to get it all done.”

His interest is in renewable energy and improving the quality of life in developing countries — and is putting his focus on new, improved cooking stoves that are more efficient, and healthier. Back in Nepal they cook everything inside with antiquated cooking stoves that create toxins and smoke in the home.

“I learned about energy through Winrock International, which is based in Arkansas, and they promote renewable energies worldwide,” said Raj. “They teach, and do proposals, train people, work with local banks, and help local businesses secure financing. I worked with them as a paid research intern for two years, and I learned about solar home systems. During my internship with Winrock is when my interest in America emerged. It really fascinated me. America is a great country as they have diverse thinking. I wanted to study here and I was really in need of those kind of connections.”

Upon arrival in the United States, Raj heard about the Rotary scholarship, and applied. After several interviews, he received the $4,000 scholarship.

“I love that Rotary is doing international things,” he said.

Raj is making plans to earn his MBA, and is currently looking at several schools. He wants to start classes in 2019.

After that, he wants to become an energy expert, and plans to eventually return to Nepal, but still travel the world bringing energy solutions to the developing parts of the world. In Nepal, they often face 18 hours of energy blackouts each day, which is a huge struggle.

“I want to work in project management and bring good products to help people in these places,” Raj said. “I want to first gain work experience in the United States and stay here for 5-10 years and then set up my own company in Nepal. I want to help in different ways. I love my country but I want to get established here. I want to get all this experience and go back and help.”

Nepal

Raj wants to market new, more efficient stoves in Nepal and other developing countries.

The 26 year-old has two older sisters and one younger brother, who only attended school through the 7th grade. He was raised in Kathmandu, but was born 2.5 hours away — in rural Nepal. There aren’t a lot of jobs there for people who don’t have an education, and the nation has a massive unemployment problem.

“Renewable energy is a way to a healthy life,” Raj said. “It’s a way to progress and sustainability. It’s a way to empower people. I think there are ways we can think critically — in different ways. Like using solar cars, and it’s just healthier.”

He said that solar home heating systems and modern cooking stoves are key to their progress.

He plans to bring newer stoves to market, because their current models are making women and children sick, given that most women stay at home in Nepal.

“With new cooking stoves, we can eliminate these health problems and provide for a better life,” he said. “In the cities, they use more gas stoves with ventilation. The traditional stoves are used more in the rural areas.”

He’d like to see Metallic Improved Cooking (MIC) stoves spread through his native country — and to other parts of the developing world.

Photo Gallery

 

Washougal, WA – Princesses, superheroes and witches, oh my!  Local families are invited to wear their Halloween costumes and receive their very own FREE pumpkin at the annual Downtown Washougal Pumpkin Harvest Festival on Saturday, October 27 from noon to 3pm at Reflection Plaza.  The event will take place rain or shine and is presented by City of Washougal and the Downtown Washougal Association.

Nearly 1,000 pumpkins will be on hand thanks to a generous donation from Columbia River Realty and City of Washougal support.  A straw hay maze will be created for kids to walk through to select their special pumpkin.  All pumpkins are free, one per child, while supplies last.

“The Pumpkin Harvest Festival has grown in popularity each year,” said Rose Jewell, event organizer and City of Washougal Assistant to the Mayor and City Administrator.  “It is wonderful to see so many Washougal families come out and enjoy this fun event.”  Previously held Wednesday afternoons during elementary school early release, last year the event was moved to Saturday and saw an increase in participation with entire families able to attend.

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The event is completely free and will also feature carnival games with candy and toy prizes run by student and community volunteers, face painting, balloon animal makers sponsored by IQ Credit Union, apples donated by Washougal Family Dental, popcorn from the Washougal Fire Department, a selfie station and more.

“We love to host events such as this in downtown,” said Heena, DWA president.  “After families enjoy the activities at Reflection Plaza, many stay to explore shops and restaurants in downtown Washougal.”

Volunteers are still needed.  If you would like to help please contact dwavolunteers@gmail.com

Pumpkin

Dressed up for the Pumpkin Harvest Festival!

Welcome to our Weekly Food + Dining Guide! This week, we feature the BRUNCH options at The Hammond Kitchen and Craft Bar.

Come experience their Traditional Benedict, Crab Cake Benedict, House Smoked King Salmon Omelet with Hollandaise, Healthy Breakfast Bowl, the Forrest Mushroom and Gouda Omelet, their Classic Breakfast, and more!

The Hammond also a good mix of pasta, chicken, fresh seafood offerings. Steaks are choice prime beef. Burgers are a brisket and chuck blend. They also serve delicious brick oven pizzas.

Located at 4857 NW Lake Road, #200, Camas, WA 98607.

Hours: Monday-Thursday, 11:00 am-9 pm; Friday, 11:00 am-10 pm; Saturday, 10:30 am-10 pm; Sunday, 10:30-10 pm; Social Hour, Monday-Friday 4-6 pm, plus Saturday + Sunday, 3-6 pm.

Phone: 360-954-5620

Visit: www.TheHammondKitchenandCraftBar.com

CAFFE PICCOLO — Downtown Camas

Dining

Apple Cinnamon Bun Frappe (blended) or Latte.

This week, we’re offering a new Apple Cinnamon Bun Frappe (blended) or Latte. Each day, you can come try a new soup for lunch, along with one of our great espressos, lattes and speciality coffee drinks — featuring Caffe Umbria. For breakfast or brunch, we have delicious breakfast sandwiches and panini’s. Come to relax, unwind, or open your laptop and have a remote office. People love to meet her socially or for casual business meetings. We’d love to see you. 400 Northeast Fourth Avenue, Camas, WA, at the corner of Fourth & Cedar

Hours: Open Monday – Friday 7 am – 5 pm, Saturday 8 am – 4 pm, Sunday 9 am – 3 pm

Phone: 360-834-7044

Visit: www.caffe-piccolo.com

 

HEY JACK, — Downtown Camas

Events! – We host them!

Hey Jack is now available for your private party, holiday bash, wedding shower, or Corporate function. There’s never a room fee, we can tailor-make your menu to meet just about any budget, and we can comfortably fit up to 30 people for seated dinner, or 45 people for a stand-up mixer. Special discounts given to Monday or Tuesday events. Email: don@heyjackkitchen.com for more information or to reserve your date.

Speaking of events, we’re planning on a 5-course wine dinner featuring the wines of France, Italy, and Spain. We’re working on a special menu devoted to food and wine pairing and he exploration of Old World Wines for any level of wine knowledge. All we ask is you have fun and bring an appetite. Stay tuned to Facebook and Instagram for more information.

Hey Jack, 401 NE 4th Ave, Camas WA 98607
Reservations Call: (306)954-5053
Dining

Hey Jack interior.

HANA KOREAN — Downtown Camas

Dining

Bi Bim Bop.

For those who know and appreciate Korean food, Hana is the real deal. Hana offers Korean, teriyaki, noodles, combinations, and sides at reasonable prices. A customer favorite is the Bi Bim Bop (featured above), as well as the Bul-Go-Gi, which is thinly sliced marinated beef, stir-fried vegetables, and steamed rice. Portion sizes are generous.

Located in the heart of Downtown Camas at 412 NE 4th Ave.

Hours: Monday-Saturday, 11 am-8:30 pm

Phone: 360-833-9111

 

 

NAVIDI’S OLIVE OIL & VINEGARS — Downtown Camas

Dining

Come try all the new olive oils and vinegars.

Navidi’s has a long tradition of providing the best olive oils, vinegars, speciality salts and seasonings to make your meals extraordinary. Visit us today to sample our fabulous oils and vinegars, which also make great gifts. 322 NE Cedar Street, Camas, WA 98607

Hours: Monday thru Saturday 11 am – 6 pm and Sunday noon – 5 pm.

Phone: 360-210-5921

Visit: www.navidioiols.net

NUESTRA MESA — Downtown Camas

Dining

Try one of Nuestra Mesa’s classic breakfasts.

Mesa serves Brunch EVERY Sunday from 10am-3pm! Join us for our take on classic breakfast Mexican dishes such as the Huevos Rancheros, Chilequilas,and Breakfast Burrito.

Located at 228 NE 4th Avenue, in Downtown Camas, Mesa offers gourmet Mexican cuisine. It’s a family friendly location.

Hours: Monday-Thursday, 11:30 am-9 pm; Friday + Saturday, 11:30 am-10 pm; Sundays, 10 am-3 pm (Brunch only).

Phone: 360-210-5311

Visit: www.NuestraMesa.com

FEAST @316 —Downtown Camas

Dining

Fettuccine Bolognese.

Located in the heart of historic Downtown Camas, Washington, Feast @316 offers one of the best dining experiences in the Northwest with Fresh Seafood, Certified Angus Beef, Craft Cocktails, and Signature Wines. Located in Downtown Camas at 316 NE Dallas St.

Hours: Monday-Thursday, 11:30 am-9 pm; Friday + Saturday, 11:30 am-10 pm; Sunday, 4-9 pm; Happy Hour, Monday-Friday 3-5 pm.

Phone: 360-210-7498

Visit: www.CamasFeast316.com

GRAINS OF WRATH — Downtown Camas

Dining

Great food at Grains of Wrath!

GOW has nine beers on tap, and will offer these staple beers year-round:

  • Lulu: A tart peach golden ale
  • Lugar: German style Pilsner, floral black tea, crackery malt, hay, crisp finish
  • Papermaker Pale: Light, biscuit malt, grapefruit, pineapple, balanced bitterness
  • EGA IPD: Melon, pine, soft tropical fruit, papaya
  • Overkill PA: Stonefruit, diesel, passion fruit, citrus, piney, dank

They also offer a great brisket and chuck patty burger with cheddar, iceberg lettuce, aioi and zucchini pickles on a sesame brioche bun. Fabby recommends the Carnitas Torta with black bean puree, cotija cheese, cascabel chile aioli, and pickled carrots. The roasted bone marrow with onion jam served on grilled flatbread is also on the top of the list.

Hours: Monday-Thursday, 11 am-10 pm; Friday-Saturday, 11 am-12 am; Sunday, 11 am-9 pm; Happy hour is 3-6 weekdays. They are located at 230 NE 5th Ave. Camas, WA 98607

Phone: 360-210-5717

Visit: www.gowbeer.com

TOMMY O’s — Downtown Vancouver

Enjoy our great restaurant in Downtown Vancouver!

One of the best Happy Hour and Weekend Brunch destinations in Vancouver, they also offer a full Sushi menu with creative and delicious options. For lunch and dinner, choose from selections like Macadamia Crusted Halibut, Kona Coffee Rubbed Flat Iron Steak, or Island style cuisine like Teriyaki Chicken, Kalbi Ribs, and Coconut Shrimp. We also offer many gluten-free and vegetarian options. Located at 801 Washington St Vancouver, WA.

Hours: Brunch, Saturday-Sunday, 9 am-noon; Lunch, Daily 11 am-4 pm; Dinner, Daily 4-9 pm; Aloha Hour, 3-6 pm

Lounge Hours: Monday-Thursday, 3 pm-6 pm; Friday-Saturday, 3 pm-11 pm; Sundays

Phone: 360-694-5107

Visit: www.tommyosaloha.com

Camas, WA — For this month’s First Friday reception, the Attic Gallery, which is located in Downtown Camas, is featuring new abstract paintings by Earl Hamilton.

The opening reception begins at 5 pm Friday, October 5.

Hamilton was born in Japan, and spent most of his childhood in a small cabin in the Rodgers Mountain Area outside the town of Scio, Oregon in the Willamette Valley, with his parents Satsuko and George. The family lived an independent lifestyle on their secluded homestead, painting together in their cabin’s living room, which set the stage for a life in the art world.

Hill

http://tvc.org/meet-jen

Living a frugal lifestyle, hauling water, milking goats, collecting eggs from their chickens, and without television and radio, Earl was encouraged to read and discuss all forms of art. He learned self-sufficiency and a desire to follow his own artistic instincts.

He now lives with his wife, Michelle, in Lebanon, which is another small Oregon town.

Hamilton does not have a website, but you can learn more about his work at www.AtticGallery.com

Visitors to the Attic Gallery reception this Friday will be treated to wine, refreshments, and music by Paul Chasman. The Attic Gallery has been operating for 45 years, and got its start in Portland.

Hamilton

Earl Hamilton abstract paintings.