Washougal, WA — The eerie sound of chains rattling, footsteps across a wooden floor, actors voicing character dialog and a healthy dose of imagination.  These are just some of the elements that will bring “Charles Dickens A Christmas Carol – A Radio Play” to life by the Jemtegaard Middle School Soundstage students and staff.

“Last spring our Soundstage club was supposed to perform The Box by Lindsay Price and then of course COVID happened,” said Diana Larson, Soundstage creator and advisor.  “It was a big disappointment.  We had the scenery ready and everything.  We considered a mini version, but it just would not have been the same.” 

Not wanting to disappoint the students again, it was decided to perform a radio play this fall.  “We found that there were a lot of radio show scripts out this year,” said Larson.  “We were excited to find this classic holiday story and it even came with sound effects.  We decided to do it!”   

Soundstage club members were ready for the challenge, having met over the summer with upwards of 20 students attending the weekly sessions.  Larson used her connections with actors, singers, and dancers from New York through her years in vocal training to connect her students on Zoom to professionals in the entertainment industry.  “We had online dance instruction, sing-a-longs, monolog sessions and even had a very special guest, Juliana Conte, a singer/dancer who has appeared in New York in Spring Awakening and the Adams Family,” she said. John Armor, Shakespearean actor and stage combat choreographer for Portland Opera and other theater companies, also provided virtual lessons over the summer.

The radio show was cast via virtual auditions in October. “The great thing for students is that no one has to work to memorize the lines,” said Larson. “They will read them as their character.  There will be no visuals, just the listeners’ imagination.” 

Washougal
www.artfuljuxtaposition.com

Rounding out the cast will be several notable special guests. John Hugill, a local Portland actor, will anchor the show and perform the lead role of Ebenezer Scrooge.  JMS principal, David Cooke, will read the part of Bob Cratchit and WSD Superintendent Mary Templeton will voice Mrs. Cratchit.  Other JMS staff participating include History teachers Scott Rainey and Scott Hoisington. 

“The student actors were outstanding,” said Templeton.  “They came to the recording prepared.  They knew their lines, their characters and had vocal presence.  They created a presentation that is artistic and engaging.” 

Each actor will record their part via Zoom and then it will be professionally edited together, with sound effects, for the final product.  “Our sound engineer, Vic Sorisio, is doing the recording and editing,” said Larson.  “He also coached the students to understand how they need to sit and speak during their recording for the best sound quality.” 

Recordings took place November 2 and 5 and the show will be available online on the Washougal School District website on December 4.  Just in time for the holidays. 

“My goal is to provide these students an opportunity to be a part of a production and experience that joy and satisfaction,” said Larson.  “I also hope that the show brings our community together with a shared holiday experience.”

Camas, WA — Lara Blair Photography in downtown Camas is offering limited Holiday Sparkle & Wonder session to capture the spirit and joy of the season.

Blair answers some questions about this fun, new project.

What is a Sparkle & Wonder session?

For 45 minutes, we capture your family in a choice of holiday sets (super creative…think “Target ad”) and also on a plain white backdrop. We want you to have some original holiday images for your cards and social media, but we also feel everyone should have up-to-date, fun family images to display at home.

When are the sessions?

We are shooting only a handful in November. We are providing evening appointments (a rarity at our studio) so everyone can make it. We’re booking now—first come, first booked.

What’s the investment?

This session is $250, a savings of $100 from our usual sessions. Our portrait design specialist will walk you through our products (including fabulous holiday cards!). With a $600 order, you receive 25 complimentary cards.

Call 360.980.2413 or email [email protected] to schedule your session today!

Blair
www.artfuljuxtaposition.com

Camas, WA — Attic Gallery, located in historic downtown Camas, is featuring for the month of October a Solo Exhibit with 15 new paintings by Earl Hamilton.

“Earl’s been really busy during the pandemic and he brought over some stunning new work, and we’re so happy to feature him all month long,” said Maria Gonser, co-owner of Attic Gallery. “His new work is amazing! Please come see it.”

About Earl Hamilton

Earl, now in his sixties, spent most of his childhood living in a small cabin in the Rodgers Mountain area outside the town of Scio (Oregon) in the Willamette Valley, with his parents Satsuko and George Hamilton, both successful artists. The family lived self-sufficiently on their secluded homestead, painting together in their cabin’s living room. Thus, from an early age, Earl was influenced to enter the art world. Living a frugal lifestyle, hauling water, milking goats, collecting eggs from their chickens and minus TV and radio, he was encouraged to read and talk a lot about art. Earl learned self-sufficiency and a desire to follow his own artistic instincts. He now lives in Lebanon, another small Oregon town, where he works on his paintings every day and usually most of the night. 

Earl studied art in high school where he won a Scholastic Gold Key award for the State of Oregon and a National Gold Medal Scholastic Award for a competition in New York City. He won an art scholarship while studying art at Oregon State University. In 1980, Earl won The Grumbacker Award for the Northwest Watercolor Society, and 1981 the First Place Sweepstake Award for the Watercolor Society of Oregon. 

Earl’s paintings are filled with a kind of whimsical lightness reflected in many images such as castles, clowns, children, animals and lovers. He layers acrylics and uses collage materials in many of his abstract works. Earl’s paintings whether abstract or whimsical objects, could be called meditative, mystical, contemplative, energetic, bold and confident in brushstroke. “I knew that I would always be an artist. Art has become a way of life for me, of perceiving and being. You take art with you whether you paint or not. It’s in your eyes and in your hands.”

Learn more at www.atticgallery.com

421 NE Cedar St
Camas, WA 98607

360-833-9747

Email: [email protected]

Hamilton
Earl Hamilton is the Attic Gallery solo exhibit for the month of October.

Washougal WA — Washougal Arts and Culture Alliance will host an online art festival as an alternative to its annual August event cancelled due to COVID-19 pandemic public gathering restrictions. 

“We are very excited that our virtual 2020 Washougal Art Festival will last not just one day, but the entire month of August,” said WACA president, Kelli Rule.  “Our website will be the hub, and from there people will be able to access the festival through our Facebook and Instagram pages.”

The goal of WACA’s art festivals is to create exposure and drive sales for local and regional artists. According to Rule, artists have pushed themselves to create exclusive videos, new and refreshed websites and more to help promote their art in a new way online.  “We hope our community will support these local artisans, hard hit by the cancellation of so many opportunities to sell their art,” Rule said.  “We’ll do our best through social media to give the artists the attention they deserve.  When you purchase original artwork, you are not only buying that object, but you’re investing in that person.”

The event will highlight the work of 25 artists, each selected to participate by a jury of art professionals. 2020 festival artists are Linda Andrews-Riggs, water color; Eric Berlin, porcelain jewelry; Shirley Bishop, fused glass; Jean Blatner, watercolor acrylic; India de Landa, plexiglass acrylic jewelry; Chrissie Forbes, found art & oils, Katy Fenley, silver jewelry; Kyla Rae Friedrichsmeyer, watercolor & ink; Anni Furniss, mixed media; John Furniss, woodworking; Suzanne Grover, pen & colored pencil; Charlene Hale, fused glass; Kellie Kuter, mixed media; Brenda Lindstrom, oil; Beck Lipp, woodworking; Toni McCarthy, jewelry; Diane Moeglein, fused glass; Liz Pike, oil on canvas; Spike Palmer, oil painting; Karen Reule, silver jewelry; Gary Suda & Pamela Hancock, ceramics; Tamra Sheline, watercolor on yupo; Hiroko Stumpf, watercolor & acrylic; Cyndee Starr, mixed media; Barbara Wright, water color, ink, pencil; Jeff Wirth, photography; and Tom West, acrylic, stationery.

Art
www.electlarryhoff.com

Each year a local artist is selected to create an image for the event poster that reflects Washougal in some way. This year’s poster art of a deer among tall grass was drawn by Washougal artist, Suzanne Grover, a founding member of WACA, whose work will be a part of the virtual festival. Her beautiful spring meadow scene was created from the photography of John Rakestraw.  Signed posters are available for a $20 donation.  There is a limited number of signed posters from previous festivals available as well, which can be purchased directly from WACA by emailing [email protected].

“This year has been hard for artists who have seen so many fairs, festivals and events cancelled,” Rule explained.  “Artists have not been able to meet potential customers face-to-face and we know it is hard for them to make connections.   We hope this virtual event will help in some small way.”

Join the festival at the WACA website http://washougalarts.org/ or  https://www.facebook.com/WashougalArts/https://www.instagram.com/washougal_arts/.

Art Festival
Washougal Art Festival

Art presents itself in so many different forms and can incorporate many different media. This became a challenge and opportunity for Canyon Creek Middle School 6th grade art teacher, Alice Yang, once schools closed and distance learning began.

“During our first week of distance learning in mid-April, students hadn’t gotten their art kits from me yet, so I had to come up with a project using household items,” Yang explained. “We started our unit by looking at some artists who use cardboard and paper as their medium. I uploaded a video that shows several ways of connecting cardboard, some that do not use glue. The assignment was very open-ended, to create a sculpture using cardboard or paper which they could paint or decorate as they wished.”

Projects submitted by students included a cuckoo clock, a Polaroid camera, shoes, and a boat. One project, created by Morgan Musser, stood out with its intricate detail and the spiraling form which gave it a sense of movement and realism.

“Morgan worked about six hours a day for this week-long assignment,” said Yang. “When we shared the projects during our weekly Zoom meeting, the other students were blown away. Some felt a bit down that theirs weren’t at the same level, so we stopped and talked about the danger of comparison and how everyone is good at something.”

Learning
Remote art lessons.

“I was inspired by pictures of Chinese Dragons I viewed on the internet,” explained Musser. “I used tinfoil to make a form for the body, which I later learned from my art teacher is called armature.”

Musser further explained her process, that began by cutting out each individual scale from thin cardboard, empty waffle boxes, and hot glued them to the form. She used a thicker cardboard, from a shipping box, for the back spines, which also provided a different element of color. Then she cut different shapes for the face and pieced them together in a kind of puzzle and secured the pieces in place with hot glue. “My favorite element of this piece is the dragon’s face,” she said. “I was nervous about the final result, but it turned out better than I expected.”

Distance learning overall has been a challenge for Yang and all WSD art teachers. “Not having access to materials is the biggest roadblock,” she said. “I was able to put together an art kit for my 30 sixth-grade students containing a drawing kit, oil pastels, watercolor set, a sketchbook, glue stick, and an assortment of papers. They received these during their second week of remote classes.”

Art instruction is a feedback-driven process, Yang explained, saying it can be difficult for students to work in isolation without input from the teacher and peers. Access to the internet is also a driving factor in students’ ability to complete work. Most of the projects involve viewing videos in Google Classroom, and though all students have iPads, some don’t have the capability of using it for online work.

“I appreciate the time and effort students are putting in and am impressed with the work that is coming back,” Yang said, “However, I’m so ready to return to school!”

Elida’s Annual Sample Sale Silent Auction is happening now on Facebook.

Starts Friday, Nov. 29th @ 9:00am
Ends Sunday, Dec. 1st @ 9:00pm
Starting bids as low as $35.

This is a great opportunity to own original artwork at a discounted price!
Bids starting as low as $35! Buy local, buy original!

Here’s how bidding works:

To bid on a painting during this Silent Auction, write your bid in the comment section for the piece you want (CLICK ON THE PAINTING YOU WANT AND COMMENT THERE). Watch your painting over the weekend and re-bid. If you are outbid (bidding is increments of $10). Bidding ends at 9 pm Pacific Time on Sunday. We will contact the winner through Facebook Messenger. For questions, email Stephanie at [email protected].

Link to Elida’s facebook page where you can access the sale on Friday:
https://www.facebook.com/elida.field

Silent Auction

Attic Gallery, which is located in historic Downtown Camas, is currently featuring the enticing works of artist Earl Hamilton. The gallery, which recently opened a new Exhibition Room, also has a brand-new frame shop where you can custom order frames to meet your artistic needs.

Earl Hamilton, now in his sixties, spent most of his childhood living in a small cabin in the Rodgers Mountain area outside the town of Scio (Oregon) in the Willamette valley, with his parents Satsuko and George Hamilton, both successful artists. The family lived self-sufficiently on their secluded homestead, painting together in their cabin’s living room. Thus, from an early age, Earl was influenced to enter the art world. Living a frugal lifestyle, hauling water, milking goats, collecting eggs from their chickens and minus TV and radio, he was encouraged to read and talk a lot about art. Earl learned self-sufficiency and a desire to follow his own artistic instincts. He now lives in Lebanon, another small Oregon town, where he works on his paintings every day and usually most of the night. 

Earl studied art in high school where he won a Scholastic Gold Key award for the State of Oregon and a National Gold Medal Scholastic Award for a competition in New York City. He won an art scholarship while studying art at Oregon State University. In 1980, Earl won The Grumbacker Award for the Northwest Watercolor Society, and 1981 the First Place Sweepstake Award for the Watercolor Society of Oregon. 

Earl’s paintings are filled with a kind of whimsical lightness reflected in many images such as castles, clowns, children, animals and lovers. He layers acrylics and uses collage materials in many of his abstract works. Earl’s paintings whether abstract or whimsical objects, could be called meditative, mystical, contemplative, energetic, bold and confident in brushstroke.

Hamilton
One of the works of Earl Hamilton.

“I knew that I would always be an artist,” said Hamilton. ”Art has become a way of life for me, of perceiving and being. You take art with you whether you paint or not. It’s in your eyes and in your hands.”

To learn more, visit www.AtticGallery.com

The gallery is open Tuesday through Saturday from 11 am to 5 pm.

Hamilton
The works of Earl Hamilton are on display at Attic Gallery.

Washougal, WA — Washougal students from Jemtegaard and Canyon Creek Middle Schools are the newest contributors to the surge of public art in Washougal.  On October 12, a crisp, sunny Saturday morning, more than 25 student artists from the Club 8 after-school program met to create a patchwork Chinook salmon mural on a public retaining wall at the corner of “D” and Durgan Streets downtown.

The creative mural work began weeks ahead when Club 8 students, lead by JMS art teacher, Dani Allen, met with local muralist Travis London to come up with their individual designs for the piece.   Allen was the driving force behind the project that has been envisioned for several years.

“This was a great example at the partnerships that take place in Washougal to support art,” said Allen.  “City of Washougal supplied the location and cleaned and primed the wall.  Washougal Schools Foundation provided a grant for the paint and a consulting fee for Travis.  Washougal Arts and Culture Alliance worked to bring these relationships together and Washougal School District supports the middle school Club 8 after-school program.”

“It’s great working with middle school students,” said London. “They enjoyed learning the process of mural creation.  I met with them just once and gave them tips and direction on how to take these designs from paper to a wall. They did great!”

London conceived of the Chinook salmon design to serve as a template because of how the fish represents the Washougal area.

According to Allen, the message around the mural was to celebrate diversity and individuality.  

Mural
www.MeuPilates.com

“Students took inspiration from the theme that being different is ok and differences should be celebrated,” she said.  “They wanted the images to be positive and inspirational.  The students took their design and this project very seriously.  Just look at how many kids came out early on a Saturday to be a part of it.”

“I love painting and love making our world a better place,” explained Aubrey Kleiva, JMS 6th grade student.  “It is cool because I can make people smile through art.”  Her section of the mural included a quote to
offer encouragement.  Her words are; “Life can be a rough current but just keep swimming through it.”

Allen and her Club 8 art students were also responsible for creating a mural on the baseball shed at Lower Hathaway Park ball field in 2018 and are already looking at locations for their next public art project.

There’s been a surge of public art in Washougal: https://lacamasmagazine.com/2019/10/official-unveiling-of-the-white-wing-mural-in-honor-of-betsey-ough.html

Mural
Creating the mural.
Mural
The completed mural.

The City of Washougal is inviting the community to celebrate the city’s history and its newest piece of public art with the official unveiling of the White Wing Mural in honor of Betsey Ough, Wednesday, October 9 at 4 pm.  The ceremony will take place in front of the piece, located outside the Washougal Library at 1661 C Street, Washougal.  A reception will follow in the Washougal Community Center next door. 

“If you are familiar with Washougal’s history, you know that Betsey White Wing Ough, a Cascades Tribe princess, along with her husband Richard Ough, founded our great city,” said Jim Cooper, Washougal Arts and Culture Alliance board president.  “For her role, Betsey is lovingly referred to by many as the ‘Mother of Washougal.’ The theme of the mural is Richard Ough courting Betsey White Wing Ough.” 

WACA spearheaded the effort and lead fund raising for the work. 

Mural artist Toma Villa is an internationally renowned Native American artist.  He will attend the dedication and share his thoughts about White Wing and how he developed the 8’-11” x 25’ scene.  “Through my extensive research on Betsey Ough (White Wing) of the Washougal people, I found her story inspiring on a personal level,” he said. “What it shows is how love can change one’s life and what can be created from it.” 

Inspiration came in part from a quote describing Richard Ough’s feelings for the young princess. “…he thought he could see White Wing in the clouds and in the forest and in his dreams.  He said, “Come pretty bird and fly with me, for I am lonely, and my nest is empty.”

Mural

For the mural, Villa chose to feature the egret bird to represent White Wing for its beauty and grace. “I used seven of them for that is a significant number in Columbia River longhouses,” he explained. “They are facing East; of the way the wind blows on the river. The baskets are from the Two Rivers Heritage Museum and are part of a greater collection in Washougal, accenting the mural representative of White Wing as a weaver same as her grandmother.” 

The unveiling and dedication ceremony program will begin with a Washaat Prayer by Members of the Yakima Nation, White Swan Longhouse in the tradition of their native heritage. In addition to Villa, speakers will include Washougal Mayor, Molly Coston speaking about how influential White Wing was as a woman and native landowner in early Clark County.  

Former Washougal City Council member, Joyce Lindsay, will also speak on the impact and attention drawn to Native American cultures by efforts such as the Confluence and the inspiration that led WACA to work with the artist that would memorialize Princess White Wing in this colorful mural.  

Another speaker will be Elder Johnnie Lee Wyman, who will represent the Yakima Nation and is a Great Great Grandson of Richard and Betsey Ough through their son, Benjamin Ough.  Wyman will speak on behalf of his family about the significance of this gift in honor of White Wing and how it impacts her future generations.

Attendees of the ceremony are invited to meet and greet the Ough family descendants, artist Toma Villa, city leaders, and the WACA board at the reception following in the Washougal Community Center – 1681 C Street.  Additional historic information will be provided at the reception by the Two Rivers Heritage Museum.

To learn more about Washougal artwork: https://lacamasmagazine.com/2019/03/artswa-funds-new-art-at-washougal-schools-roots-and-wings-celebration.html

CAMAS, WA — Artist Liz Pike will be painting at the Downtown Camas Plein Air Art Event on Fri., Sept. 6 from 9 am to 4 pm. Her finished work, along with 30 other artists will be viewed by the public that evening from 5-8 pm at Camas Art Gallery, 408 NE Fourth Avenue, where the community will vote for its favorites.

Finished pieces will be auctioned off at Camas Dinner in White the following evening.  Camas Gallery is also featuring a “dual artist” live paint demonstration on Friday night by Liz Pike and fellow Artist Sarah Bang starting at 4:30 pm. Each artist starts on a painting and then every 15 minutes, switches places until the painting is complete. This activity is a crowd favorite at Camas First Friday.

On Sat., Sept. 7, Pike will display new works at the Old Town Battle Ground Vintage Art Faire from 11 am to 5 pm. She will be doing a live painting demonstration in oils on canvas at her art booth located in the Urban Basics parking lot, 209 East Main Street in downtown Battle Ground. Pike’s work will also be featured in a four-day show at the Portland Fall Home & Garden Show at the Expo Center in Portland, Oct. 3-6. 

Camas Gallery continues to feature Liz’s “Field of Sunflowers” in oils on canvas, 408 NE Fourth Avenue.

Liz Pike
wwww.MeuPilates.com

“I’m inspired by the beauty of the outdoors. Our gardens at Shangri-La Farm have become both my sanctuary and muse,” says Pike. “I’m thrilled to be one of the featured artists at Camas Gallery and I look forward to sharing all of my new work with the public this fall.” 

Pike has a studio art gallery and an Art Farm, Sip & Paint Studio, at Shangri-La Farm in Fern Prairie, located at 26300 NE Third Street,  Camas. For a complete calendar listing of all of Pike’s art shows throughout 2019, visit her website at www.LizPike.Art

Sip&Paint
Artist Liz Pike.