As he prepares for his starring role in the upcoming Camas Theatre production of “Macbeth,” which opens November 8, Camas, WA actor Clayton Lukens reflects on his summer theatrical experience at Hilton Head Island, South Carolina.

Lukens was accepted into the Southeastern Summer Theatre Institute, which is a four-week summer program full show intensive for young actors. This summer, they produced “Tuck Everlasting.”

“You do a full production,” said Lukens. “Some other camps are about workshops, and this is about doing a full-scale production. We arrived and the first day we all go find our houses and the boys are housed in the colored cottages. They placed all the girls in a mansion. The first day we all walked to the beach together and we start in a circle to talk about our goals and what we are able to bring to the team.”

Each summer session has 25 students, plus the crew program with about eight youth, the institute staff and the director, Joe Barros, who has worked on Broadway several times.

“He’s [Barros] is always doing big, big projects,” said Lukens. “He always likes to switch things up.”

Being accepted into the program was a dream come true for Lukens, who found out in March he was accepted into the $6,000 camp — but he’d already been saving his money for about a year.

During application time, he filled out the basics and sent a video audition of him singing and dancing.

“And, so I brought out a friend who choreographed a dance for me,” Lukens said. “Her name is Grace Thompson. I signed my application, and was just doing Little Shop rehearsals and I was waiting. We found out March 16, which was opening day for Little Shop. The whole day I had my Chromebook open in the corner and kept refreshing. I got the email that said I was accepted. I’d been wanting to do this for over a year, and then they placed us all in a Facebook Group. We all got to know each other before we went. It was a virtual audtion process.”

The summer institute had much to do about chemistry with other people, and he was called back for two characters: Jesse Tuck, and Man in Yellow Suit. The whole plot is this family drinks the water and now will never die.

“They learn lessons that life is valuable, and some point you have to get off the wheel so others can experience it,” said Lukens. “I ended up playing Man in Yellow Suit. He wants to monopolize on the water. I was double cast, and then I played ensemble second weekend. That was hard. You have to learn two roles.”

He said the first challenge was having to memorize everything off-book before arrival, which was rough for the “in-the-moment” learner that Lukens is.

Theatre

On the set of “Tuck Everlasting.”

The institute program is pretty tough, with 9-13 hour rehearsal days, every day.

“We spend our time choreographing every scene, learning the music, learning the harmonies,” he said. “We do that for the first two weeks, and it’s very exhausting. We did this seven days a week with only two days off. On those days off, we went to Savannah, and then went to the beach on Hilton Head.”

By the time they got to opening day, he said the team felt very prepared and that they all became really good friends.

The teens did six performances in total, with each lasting 1 hour and 40 minutes — which is a short time for a musical.

“Joe completely reinvented the show,” Lukens said. “It’s very different from what appeared on Broadway. The play flopped on Broadway, so Joe fixed the dents. He incorporated 126 umbrellas into the whole show. It was amazing!”

Breaking umbrellas was a real problem.

So, what did Lukens learn the most from this?

“I think I learned that the biggest part is interpretation,” said Lukens. “It can be funny, and wild and weird, but deep down you have to be a person that the audience can relate to. They taught me how to get deeper into the character. A lot of people can fake it on stage, but making it an actual character so that he feels like a person.”

“Kris Saucedo played Tuck. He went to the program last summer, so I found him on Instagram and he’d been to the institute previously, and he had been helping promote the program. We became really great friends. The set design was amazing. It was the best set I’ve ever stepped on to. They had these umbrellas in the sky, and we had lots of trap doors on the stage. One time I sat in the trap door for four hours while reading a book. It was totally fine to listen.”

“It took us that whole year to save up for it. It was the best experience I’ve ever had with theatre. You’re just in a group of people that all want to do the same things you do. There are some days when you’re with someone for 13 hours, and you want to snap — you get so exhausted. For sure, we had our different groups, but it was just a crazy community to be around. Time moves differently there. It’s its own little world.”

Theatre

Man in Yellow Suit, played by Clayton Lukens.

To be considered for the program, you have to be in high school —as a rising freshman up to a recently graduated senior.

Ben Wolfe started the program, which has flourished through the years. He contributes so much, said Lukens, and he gives everything to that company.

One of the original producers came to the show, and the original Jessie Tuck came and did a Master Class. His name is Andrew Keenan-Bolger. He’s a big broadway celebrity.

“Clayton is an outstanding young man filled with a joy and energy that makes every room he enters a little bit brighter,” said Wolfe. “We loved working with him this summer.”
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Go to www.summertheatreinstitute.com to learn more.

Photo Gallery

Photos by Southeastern Summer Theatre Institute.

Camas, WA — For this month’s First Friday reception, the Attic Gallery, which is located in Downtown Camas, is featuring new abstract paintings by Earl Hamilton.

The opening reception begins at 5 pm Friday, October 5.

Hamilton was born in Japan, and spent most of his childhood in a small cabin in the Rodgers Mountain Area outside the town of Scio, Oregon in the Willamette Valley, with his parents Satsuko and George. The family lived an independent lifestyle on their secluded homestead, painting together in their cabin’s living room, which set the stage for a life in the art world.

Hill

http://tvc.org/meet-jen

Living a frugal lifestyle, hauling water, milking goats, collecting eggs from their chickens, and without television and radio, Earl was encouraged to read and discuss all forms of art. He learned self-sufficiency and a desire to follow his own artistic instincts.

He now lives with his wife, Michelle, in Lebanon, which is another small Oregon town.

Hamilton does not have a website, but you can learn more about his work at www.AtticGallery.com

Visitors to the Attic Gallery reception this Friday will be treated to wine, refreshments, and music by Paul Chasman. The Attic Gallery has been operating for 45 years, and got its start in Portland.

Hamilton

Earl Hamilton abstract paintings.

Washougal WA — Washougal eighth grade student, Zoe Hill, was one of five Clark County youth to be awarded a $500 Arts Ambassador Scholarship by Enspire Arts, a new, local non-profit which supports young artists in the fields of music, visual art, dance, drama and literary arts.  Other 2018 winners are: Aaron Greene of Union High School (music), Zachary Lipinski of Heritage High School (music), Cassidy Watson of Camas High School (dance), and Zayah Shore of Liberty Middle School (music).

Hill

http://tvc.org/meet-jen

Hill was excited and honored to be selected as a winner for her work in visual arts.  She learned about the opportunity through an email from Jemtegaard Middle School Principal, David Cooke.

“I thought, why not!” she said.

The scholarships are designed for students entering grades 6-12 in the upcoming school year and may be used for private instruction, workshops, and/or summer study.  As a scholarship recipient, each student winner agrees to be an Arts Ambassador and “gift” some of their art or talent to the community.

“Enspire Arts believes in building community through the sharing of artistic expression and encourages youth to reach out and positively impact those in their community,” said Enspire Arts President, Sarah Lightfoot.  Examples are providing music at a senior center, leading peer-to-peer instruction or donating art for display at a homeless shelter.

The application process began last spring and included listing applicants’ previous art instruction, artistic goals and how they might give back to the community through art.  Letters of recommendation were also required and for those Hill counted on her JMS band instructor, Dr. Jennifer Snapp and JMS art teacher, Dani Allen.  “They were so wonderful to read,” she said. “I have them up on my wall at home.”

The final steps were a personal interview and sharing of her sketch book.  Hill is looking forward to using her $500 scholarship for her first formal art instruction and to work with an Enspire Arts Board Member as a mentor to implement a way to give art back to the community.

Hill said she currently uses her art as a stress reliever and as something to do when she is bored.  “I doodle a lot,” she admits.  Her artistic style has changed through the years, starting with anime and then to more detailed and realistic sketching.  “I’m back to more animated and cartoon-like imagery now,” she explained.

Hill sparked an interest from the Enspire Arts scholarship selection committee through a painted piece she created for Snapp when the school choir teacher, Jen Mahorney, passed away suddenly last spring. “This piece demonstrated that Zoe is already using her art to connect with people,” said Lightfoot.

“Enspire Arts was founded with the idea that kids, no matter what skill level can have a positive impact on their community with their artwork.” Lightfoot explained. “The scholarship applicants’ art submission is an accomplishment that exhibits a meaningful and positive contribution to the community of Clark County.”

Hill’s submission, along with the other four winners, will be unveiled and highlighted at Enspire Arts “Tango & Tapas” event on Saturday, October 13 at 7 p.m. The themed fundraiser will be filled with music and dance and held at the new Black Pearl event facility in Washougal on the Columbia River.  Money raised will support Enspire Arts projects. More information can be found at enspirearts.org.

“Our event will feature music of the evening by Latin Jazz vocalist, Jessie Marquez and Clay Giberson, keyboard,” said Lightfoot.  “Guests will enjoy professional Tango performances, a short Intro to Tango community dance lesson and a light selection of Tapas small plates and soft drinks included in the ticket price.” A cash bar will be available.

“We believe in the power of creativity to empower youth and build stronger communities,” said Lightfoot. “We are dedicated to creating vibrant and interactive arts experiences that positively impact communities and engage future generations of artists.”

Hill

Zoe Hill is an eighth grader in Washougal.

San Juan, Puerto Rico — Days after beautifying Camas with his historical mural at Young’s Deli, artist Allan Jeffs flew to Puerto Rico to work on several commissioned murals at local restaurants.

“I love the public response to my mural at Young’s Deli,” said Jeffs. “We love Camas, and while I was looking for work there in Washington, I was hired to come here to Old San Juan to paint murals in two restaurants. I’m finishing those murals next week, after that I’m going to the “mountains” to a small town called Aibonito to paint another mural in a house and maybe one in a restaurant there.”

One of those murals is a street scene of a “vegigante,” which is a traditional Puerto Rican dancer. The mural is based around the dancer, which is vivid with color and local culture. That will be finished soon.

Hoff

www.MyHeavensBest.com

The other is a beach scene from ‘El Yunque,” which has a mountain top with 360 degree views.

Jeffs said “it’s magnificent!”

He does see progress in Puerto Rico as they recover from last year’s massive hurricane, but there is still much work to do. Jeffs plans to be there for several more weeks, and will then return to Camas to see what his next project will be.

To see our video on Jeffs, click here: Jeffs Mural in Camas

To learn more, visit www.AllanJeffs.com

 

Camas, WA — Come enjoy artists in Downtown Camas painting our town! During the day on September 7th from 9 am-4 pm, local artists will be doing painting around town. So fun to watch! Then vote for your favorite during the First Friday event from 5-8pm.

The finished plein air art pieces will be on display at the Camas Gallery, 408 NE 4th, from 5-8 pm that evening. The community will vote for its favorites and “People Choice Awards” will be given. These works of art will then be auctioned off at the Dinner in White on the Columbia, a benefit for the Washougal Library Building Fund, on Saturday, September 8th at Marina Park at the Port of Camas Washougal. For artists who would like to participate, visit here for all the info: www.camasgallery.com/plein-air

 

Plein

Artwork at Journey Community Church.

Other art features, music, and activities that night are:

  • Shops around town will be hosting an artist from downtown’s Elida Field Art Studio’s Art-Women-Wine art group. These ladies do amazing work! They will also have a big party and celebration at Elida Art Studio starting at 8pm, 735 NE 6th. Join in the fun and talk with the artists!
  • Hidden Bronze Bird Tour –find the bronze birds throughout town and see what kinds of funny things they are wearing this year! Be entered to win a great prize basket!
  • Friends of Camas Arts Art Show and Sale at Journey. Help support the arts in the Camas School District!
  • Art guessing game in select locations–guess the artist of a famous piece of artwork and be entered to win!
  • Art shows and receptions at Camas Gallery, 408 NE 4th, will feature Cheryl Matheison and  Attic Gallery, 421 NE Cedar, will feature Jean Schwalbe
    (Note: Second Story Gallery will not be hosting a reception for this First Friday–they’ll see you in October!)
  • Kids’ art crafts and 5th annual coloring contest
  • Rock painting with The Paint Roller!
  • Shop, dine, & have artful fun in Downtown Camas! Receive a free prize ticket for every $10 you spend in downtown.

This information is provided by the Downtown Camas Association.

The 10th Annual Downtown Camas Vintage & Art Street Faire will feature 60+ vintage and local art vendors all in the charming tree-lined streets of Downtown Camas.

When: Saturday, August 25th, 9am-3pm

Vintage offerings include a huge variety of indoor and outdoor furniture and home and garden items as well as clothing and accessories. Art offerings include quality paintings, woodworking, glass art, metal work, handmade jewelry, fiber art, repurposed art, and more (see below for list of 2018 Art Vendors) Live music and fresh, delicious food will also be available.  The friendly and inviting ambience of the town will complete the experience!

The Faire will be hosted on Saturday August 25th, in Downtown Camas on 4th Avenue and Birch Streets, near Camas Antiques, 305 NE 4th Avenue.

Come early for fresh coffee at 9am, enjoy lunch at one of Downtown Camas’ many fine eating establishments, and stay until 3pm  finding the perfect items for your home and garden.

Live music will include jazz guitar by Bret Malmquist from 10-12 and Carol Rossio Jazz Trio with French influence from 12:30-3pm

This event is a collaboration between the Downtown Camas Association and VV Larue Presents and is sponsored by Camas Antiques.

To learn more, visit www.downtowncamas.com

 

Washougal, WA – Excitement is building as the 2018 Washougal Art Festival draws nearer.  Presented by Washougal Arts and Culture Alliance (WACA), the event features 26 professional regional artists and will be held Saturday,
August 11 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Reflection Plaza, 1703 Main Street, Washougal.

“We are expecting another large turnout at this year’s festival,” said Janice Ferguson, WACA President.  “Now in our third year, we have artists and community members who look forward to this annual event.  We love
transforming Washougal’s Reflection Plaza into a gallery of fine works of art.”

Wilson Cady, local birding enthusiast and artist, created the artwork that was used for the 2018 Washougal Art Festival poster and advertising.  “Wilson will be at the festival and plans to work on his current piece,” said
Ferguson.  “He is looking forward to chatting with people about his process and his inspiration.”  A limited number of signed 2018, 2017 and 2016 posters will be available for purchase at the festival for a $20 donation each.

Event proceeds will bring more public art to Washougal. This year’s festival will help fund a mural inspired by Washougal matriarch, Princess White Wing (Betsy Ough) created by renown Native American artist, Toma
Villa. The piece will be created for the outside wall of the Washougal Public Library.

Baseball

For a preview of artists selected to participate in this year’s event, visit the WACA website at www.WashougalArts.org.

They are Linda Andrew-Riggs, water color; Kathy Beckman, acrylic on canvas; Eric Berlin, handcrafted animal porcelain jewelry; Heidi Curley, mixed media; Marilyn Estenes, textile  creations and photography; Katy Fenley, handcrafted sterling silver jewelry; Chrissie Forbes, found object robot art; Anni Furniss, mixed media painting; John Furniss, wood; Vickie Green, fused glass; Cheryl Hazen, recycled mosaics; Glo Lamden-Mccollough, acrylic on canvas; Kobie Moore, painted acrylic, mixed media; Toni McCarthy, jewelry; Liz Pike, oils; John Reylea, acrylic on reclaimed wood; Christine Rice, block printing print making; Karen Reule, sterling and silver filigree jewelry; Ena Shipman, ceramics and handcrafted jewelry; Gary Suda, high fire ceramic pottery; Cyndee Starr, mixed media; Tamra Sheline, watercolor on yupo (plastic); Kiri Torre, one-of-a-kind jewelry design; Barbara Wright, watercolor, ink, colored pencil, graphite; and Beck Lipp, wood.

The festival is family-friendly and features The Paint Roller – Mobile Paint Party who will be offering free, fun, artistic projects for children. Another popular element of the festival is the raffle for works of art donated by participating artists.  Tickets are $5 each and visitors choose the work of art they would like the chance to win.  Raffle winners do not need to be present to win and will be given a phone call but must be available to pick up their prize by the end of the day.

New at the festival this year will be food available for purchase at the plaza.  Local restaurant, Alex Smokehouse, will be serving delicious barbeque meals and more.

While in Washougal, visitors are encouraged to discover works of public art using the WACA art map http://washougalarts.org/local-art/ which provides locations, artists name and the year for more than 30 installations around town.  Maps will be available at the raffle table.

WACA Board Members and Festival Committee members working alongside Ferguson, are Chuck Carpenter, Joyce Lindsay, Rene Carroll, Suzanne Grover, Kelli Rule, Susan Warford and Jim Cooper.

The Festival is sponsored in part by the City of Washougal Hotel/Motel Tax Fund.  Other event sponsors include The Paint Roller – Mobile Paint Party, Washougal Coffee Company and Camas Gallery.

Washougal, WA — Step into the enchanted world of Broadway’s modern classic, Disney’s “Beauty and the Beast,” an international sensation that has played to over 35 million people worldwide in 13 countries. Based on the Academy Award-winning animated feature, the stage version includes all of the wonderful songs written by Alan Menken and the late Howard Ashman, along with new songs by Mr. Menken and Tim Rice. The original Broadway production ran for over thirteen years and was nominated for nine Tony Awards, including Best Musical.

The classic story tells of Belle, a young woman in a provincial town, and the Beast, who is really a young prince trapped under the spell of an enchantress. If the Beast can learn to love and be loved, the curse will end and he will be transformed into his former self. But time is running out. If the Beast does not learn his lesson soon, he and his household will be doomed for all eternity.

Performances are July 27 – Aug 5, 2018 at Washburn Performing Arts Center at Washougal High School, 1201 39th Street, Washougal WA, 98671.   Tickets are on sale now at journeytheater.org or by calling 360.750.8550.  Pre-sale adult tickets are $18.  Youth and senior tickets are $12.   Our “family day” performances are July 28th at 2:00 pm and 7:00 pm with all tickets $12 in advance.  Tickets for all performances are $4 more at the door.

Public Performances

Friday, July 27 – 7:00 pm

Saturday, July 28 – 2:00 pm

Saturday, July 28 – 7:00 pm

Sunday, July 29 – 2:00 pm

Friday, August 3 – 7:00 pm

Saturday, August 4 – 2:00 pm

Saturday, August 4 – 7:00 pm

Sunday, August 5 – 2:00 pm


About Journey Theater Arts Group

Our mission: “Growing youth in character, confidence and creativity, in a Christ centered community.”  Throughout the Portland/Vancouver area, Journey offers dozens of classes for ages 6-18, in drama, dance, voice and more.   In addition, we produce 12 Broadway-style shows in four locations during the school year, improv competitions, multiple summer camps and professional-level community theater musicals for all ages in summer.  Journey is a nonprofit educational organization, with offices located at 1400 NE 136th Ave, Suite 201, Vancouver WA, 98684.  Contact at 360.750.8550 or www.journeytheater.org.

 

Camas, WA — The historic Liberty Theatre turns 91 on June 14, and the operators are having a low-key celebration with a special showing of Steven Spielberg’s “Raiders of the Lost Ark.”

“This isn’t a benchmark year, so we’re not not having all the hoopla and swag bags like we did last year,” said the theatre’s operator, Rand Thornsley. “We’re having a 6 pm special showing of ‘Raiders of the Lost Ark,’ which is a community pick. We put out a poll and that was the top pick of our customers. Last year was very successful.”

For the record, “Wizard of Oz” placed second in the poll.

Thornsley’s group took over theatre operations in 2011 on St. Patrick’s Day, which is their operational anniversary, but the community is more in tune with the historic anniversary — and its opening in 1927.

This summer, the Liberty will present a Drones concert, as well as some “Beatles” programs. And, they have a few anniversary classics coming: such as “American Graffiti” to coincide with the downtown Camas Car Show in July; Alfred Hitchcock’s “Vertigo” celebrate its 6oth anniversary in July; and “Treasure of Sierra Madre,” which celebrates its 70th anniversary.

Liberty

The theatre opened in 1927.

A few fun Liberty facts:

  • It’s classic vintage, not a multiplex. “We don’t do things like Regal does. We show a lot of different movies at a lot of different times,” says Thornsley.
  • Prices are more family friendly. General admission is $4.50 and $5.50 for adults. Tuesdays are $4.50.
  • Concessions are at a price point that’s affordable.
  • The big theatre seats 300. The little theatre has 29 seats.
  • They make it all happen with a staff of five.
  • Concessions — popcorn is simple, with no artificial ingredients. It’s quality popcorn, made with sea salt, and canola oil, plus butter if you want it.

To learn more, visit www.CamasLiberty.com

Washougal School District and Unite! Washougal Community Coalition have announced the two winners of the Washougal Middle School Poster Contest Winners:

  • Trinity Nicholson, 7thGrade, Canyon Creek Middle School
  • Skye Miller, 7thGrade, Canyon Creek Middle School

The theme for the 2018 poster contest was “Everyday Heroes Unite!” and middle school students from Washougal were asked to create an original poster using this theme for the citywide contest.

Members of Unite! Washougal Community Coalition selected the two grand prize winners and the six Honorable Mentions at their April 2018 community meeting. The Honorable Mention recipients are:

  • Mia Lockard, 6thGrade, Canyon Creek Middle School
  • Claire Zakovics, 6thGrade, Jemtegaard Middle School
  • Isabella Albaugh, 6thGrade, Jemtegaard Middle School
  • Kaylee Browning, 6thGrade, Canyon Creek Middle School
  • Emily Wade, 6thGrade, Jemtegaard Middle School
  • Jada’lynn Iriarte, 6thGrade, Jemtegaard Middle School
Poster

Skye Miller’s Heroes submission.

 

“All of the entries depicted the theme ‘Everyday Heroes Unite!’ very well. It is clear that our youth realize that heroes do not need capes or super human powers to make a difference. Our youth understand that ordinary people, including themselves, can show acts of kindness towards others,” noted Megan Kanzler, Youth Engagement Coordinator for Unite! Washougal and the Washougal School District.

Trinity Nicholson’s submission will be used as the new logo for the middle school and high school prevention club – HEROES Unite! All of the artwork submitted in the contest will be distributed to local schools, our public library, government offices and other community locations.

“We look forward to next year’s poster contest and encourage all who entered this year to participate again next year” offered Kanzler. She added an invitation to all Washougal citizens, “Let us all do our part in being everyday heroes to help those around us.”

by Megan Kanzler