Following on the two town halls they held earlier this month in Yacolt and La Center, the three members of the 18th District’s legislative team will hold another town hall at the Port of Camas-Washougal on Saturday, March 16.

It’ll be the sixth town hall meeting of 2019 for Sen. Ann RiversRep. Brandon Vick andRep. Larry Hoff.

The town hall time and location on the 16th is:

12:30-2 p.m. – Port of Camas-Washougal, 24 S A St, Washougal, WA 98671

Rivers, Vick and Hoff will provide an update on the 2019 session and then take questions from attendees.

Freshman Rep. Larry Hoff has been busy learning the ropes as one of the newest lawmakers, and his bill to create a short form death certificate in Washington state has been unanimously approved by the state House.

Substitute House Bill 1799 would allow state and local registrars to issue a short form death certificate that does not list a decedent’s Social Security number, the names of their parents, or information about the cause and manner of their death. Those who would be able to request a short form include:

  • Specified family members, guardians and representatives;
  • Funeral directors or establishments;
  • A title insurer or title insurance agent handling a transaction involving property in which the decedent held a right, title or interest; and
  • A person who demonstrates that the certified copy is necessary for a determination related to the death, or for the protection of a personal or property right related to the death.
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Contact Your Lawmakers

Residents seeking more information may contact any of the legislators’ offices:

Sen. Ann Rivers
Email: Ann.Rivers@leg.wa.gov | Phone: (360) 786-7634

Rep. Brandon Vick
Email: Brandon.Vick@leg.wa.gov | Phone: (360) 786-7850

Rep. Larry Hoff
Email: Larry.Hoff@leg.wa.gov | Phone: (360) 786-7812

Lots of new things are happening at Artful Attic in Downtown Camas!

April 19th – 6:00-8:00pm
Wet Felting with Kim Cameron

21 and Older Only. Learn the basics of wet felting with Kim Cameron. During this two hour class Kim will teach you all you need to know to make this lovely clutch purse (Lisa uses hers as a cosmetic case – it’s awesome). To register for this art class, click here: https://artfulatticboutique.us20.list-manage.com/track/click?u=dbce11e34d073afb82a2f2d5e&id=87375cf694&e=056514d411

April 20th – 6:00-8:00pm
Macrame and Crystal Wall Hanging with Kay Sims

21 and older only. Create your own beautiful Macrame and Crystal wall hanging. In this 2 hour class Kay Sims will instruct you on the basics of Macrame and you’ll leave with a super cool wall hanging that’s way more awesome that the macrame you remember hanging in your mother’s house.. 🙂 $45. To register for this class, click here: https://artfulatticboutique.us20.list-manage.com/track/click?u=dbce11e34d073afb82a2f2d5e&id=d640e4b961&e=056514d411

Big changes are in store at Artful Attic! They are remodeling to better serve their customers and bringing in loads of fun new merchandise. Be sure to stop in periodically so you can see the transformation!

They also have another piece of gorgeous Camas public art coming to their exterior east wall. Local artist Anna Norris will be starting work on the mural as soon as weather allows.

To learn more, and sign up for the new email list, visit www.ArtfulAtticBoutique.com

Art
Anna Norris has drafted mural plans for Artful Attic’s east exterior wall.

The Hockinson School District (HSD) Board of Directors has selected Steve Marshall to be the district’s new superintendent.

Marshall was one of four candidates who visited HSD on March 4 for a series of interviews with teachers and classified staff, Hockinson High School students, principals, district office staff and the School Board. The finalists also participated in a community forum where they answered questions posed by attendees.

He currently serves as director of Educational Resources at Camas Public Schools.

“The Board is thrilled with the selection of Steve Marshall and thankful for the community’s and staff’s enthusiastic and significant participation in the interview process,” said Dave Olson, chairman of the Hockinson School Board.

The Board will work to formalize the details of the superintendent’s contract, which is expected to begin July 1, and hopes to approve it at its March 25 regular meeting.

Marshall served as Camas High School principal for nine years, finishing his service in 2017. He is very involved in the local community, serving on the Downtown Camas Association board, and working with the Camas-Washougal Rotary. He’s been a great champion of the community, and most recently engaged citizens to support Downtown Camas in their Small Business Revolution efforts.

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Cover photo by Mike Schultz of www.ClarkCountyToday.com
Join Washougal High School, all district schools, and the Washougal community on Friday, March 8 to celebrate the historic win by the State Champion Washougal Girls Basketball Team.  In a festive caravan led by fire trucks and police cars, they will start at Reflection Plaza at 10:15 am to revel with City employees, businesses and the community. Then the team will visit each Washougal school before the trip culminates with an assembly with the Washougal High School student body at 12:55 am

Members of the community who wish to congratulate the team can either come to Reflection Plaza at 10:15 am or to the WHS assembly at 12:55 pmto witness the presentation of the 2A State Trophy with school, district, and community leadership.  Community members are asked to park along the East side of 39th Street near WHS and check in at the main office.  School staff will guide them to the gym, where they will have dedicated seating for the ceremony.

First Friday
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Panthers
Holding the trophy!

To learn more, visit www.washougal.wednet.edu

A bill sponsored by Rep. Larry Hoff to create a short form death certificate in Washington state has been unanimously approved by the state House.

Substitute House Bill 1799 would allow state and local registrars to issue a short form death certificate that does not list a decedent’s Social Security number, the names of their parents, or information about the cause and manner of their death. Those who would be able to request a short form include:

  • Specified family members, guardians and representatives;
  • Funeral directors or establishments;
  • A title insurer or title insurance agent handling a transaction involving property in which the decedent held a right, title or interest; and
  • A person who demonstrates that the certified copy is necessary for a determination related to the death, or for the protection of a personal or property right related to the death.
Law
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According to Lifelock, nearly 800,000 decedents are intentionally targeted in the United States every year by identity thieves. Hoff says a short form death certificate would ensure sensitive personal information is kept out of the public domain, which would help thwart their efforts.

“Unfortunately, identity theft is a lucrative business,” said Hoff, R-Vancouver. “Cybercriminals have no hesitation whatsoever about stealing the personal information of decedents and profiting from it, so we have to fight back. This bill would help us do that by protecting decedents and their loved ones from being targeted. The creation of a short form is the right path forward for our state, and I was glad to see the bill receive unanimous support from my colleagues.”

Substitute House Bill 1799 now moves to the Senate for further consideration.

The lingering effects of the McCleary legislation and subsequent “fix” are leaving school districts across the state with massive budget deficits, and Camas is no exception.

Camas School District leaders have been very public for the past year that the new state funding model would have draconian budget effects, and CSD Superintendent Jeff Snell reports the district is officially grappling with an $8 million shortfall in the upcoming 2019-20 school year.

“An $8 million deficit is the reality,” said Snell. “Layoffs are coming. There has to be a reduction in force, there’s no way around it. We will send notices out on May 15 for certificated staff, and June 1 for classified staff. Sometimes you have to over-inform people that they may not have a job.”

Snell wishes this wasn’t the case, and regrets having to layoff valuable employees.

“This is just the model that we’re in because of the timing of the Legislature,” said Snell.

To deal with the upcoming shortfall, CSD is taking several actions now, which include tightening the belt, and organizing a community-based budget committee.

Tightening the belt measures:
• Reduced non-staff budgets (supplies) by 3%.
• One-year contracts for any new district employee hires.
• Cabinet raises start mid-year.

Critics say more needs to be done before laying off teachers and staff. The budget committee meets regularly to work out considerations which will be presented to Snell at the end of April. Snell will then review those considerations, and make recommendations to the School Board.

Camas School
Camas Superintendent, Jeff Snell, discusses legislative updates.

“They’ve been working hard and report to the School Board about progress,” said Snell.

“These seem like logical steps to take when facing tough budget decisions and are areas that do not impact student learning,” said Shelley Houle, president of the Camas Education Association (CEA).

CEA will be working closely with CSD during the layoff process.

“CEA works closely with management and follows a process that is set in our current bargaining agreement,” said Houle. “Ultimately CSD makes the final decisions, but CEA makes sure the process is followed.”

So, what is that process?

“There is a seniority factor found on page 39 of our contract,” said Houle. “The first step, though, is for the board to adopt a reduced educational program. Then there are steps to make sure that remaining positions will be filled by educators with the proper certifications, endorsements, and/or licenses. This section is quite detailed, but must be decided before looking at seniority. Then at the top is seniority in Washington State, followed by Camas School District, and then years in the profession. Following that is credits earned beyond BA or MA, flexibility of certification, and then lottery.”

During bargaining sessions last summer, lead CEA negotiator Mark Gardner dismissed talks of layoffs, claiming they were district scare tactics aimed at denying teachers the full promise of McCleary.

So, should CEA have settled for the 4 percent raises offered early in the negotiations? Is CSD misinterpreting the law?

“2019-20 was projected to be a dip year when levy changes were being felt the most and districts are planning on how to manage that,” said Houle. “McCleary significantly increased public education funding including money for compensation. The state was not doing its paramount duty. Legislation passed that greatly changed the structure of funding. I wouldn’t call it a misinterpretation. Districts must now restructure and reprioritize based on the new model.”

Camas School
CEA at their general membership meeting in August 2018.

If the new model ends up laying off teachers all over the state how is that helping things?

“I can’t make a hindsight decision on our negotiations,” said Houle. “We bargained on the current conditions for the increased funding that McCleary provided. The state had failed in its paramount duty which included compensation. With a new model comes a shift in how money is spent. We have a teacher shortage in our state and country. With increased compensation comes better recruitment and retainment. But first, budget decisions have to be made. We hate to see any reductions in staff because we value our colleagues and the important work they do every day for students.”

So, knowing the new model would result in layoffs, of which they were very transparent, why did CSD agree to last year’s CEA settlement?

“There were very strong political forces at play, financials in a new model, and we were still trying to understand the impact of the new model,” said Snell. “There was a massive infusion of cash and as those come out you try to come up with solutions that are going to work. And, we felt it was our job to get classes started on time. Teachers needed to be teaching.”

“These are the realities. When you look across the landscape, our raises were consistent with other districts. You have to have a workforce that’s competitive and is compensated fairly. We feel like we have a great staff, but we also have this big conundrum we’re trying to work through. Trying to be very thoughtful about the entire problem. We’re doing the best we can with what we’ve been given. Because the models change, either the Legislature has to do things differently, or we have to make major cuts.”

Camas School
Camas School Board at a recent meeting.

He said the process doesn’t just happen with one decision point.

“It’s an incredibly complex new funding model, and it took several months to really understand it,” said Snell. “I care about our schools and staff and I want the best for everyone there. I try to be as transparent as possible, and that’s why we started the budget committee. You walk this fine line of is that it’s so complex it’s really hard to explain.”

Senator Ann Rivers said the problem with the legislation is that it put all the money out in one lump sum.

“When we agreed to the bill it was meant to release the funds over time, in a more gradual way, but they changed it at the last minute, and all these billions went out at once,” said Rivers. “It was like dragging a doughnut through a fat farm! Everyone wanted a part of it, and suddenly the Washington Education Association (WEA) started talking about 25 percent raises — and it wasn’t true.”

Rivers said once the unions put that out about 25 percent raises, it galvanized their membership, and pushed them to issue strike threats.

“The WEA misled their teachers, the public, and some school districts felt like they were extorted — forced to give teachers raises they knew they couldn’t afford.”

Did Snell feel like he was extorted?

He said no.

“I have a role to try to find balance and see our workforce costs and compare them to what we need to offer,” he said.

And, Snell also discussed the complexities of budgets in this new funding model.

“Budgets in public schools are very challenging because you don’t know what the revenue is from the Legislature,” said Snell. “We can see right now there are all kinds of bills out there that can change things. There are changes but it’s within a similar structure. The challenge has led to confusion and different interpretations and you see negotiations that are really challenging. You have a Legislature that is still wrestling with this.”

Did the McCleary legislation unintentionally create more harm than good?

Eric Engebretson, president of the Washington Association of Educators (WAE) said the Washington Education Association (WEA) played a key role in pushing the Supreme Court decision and in lobbying for the legislation that is causing today’s havoc.

“The legislation had good intent, but it also has a mixed message,” said Engebretson. “It’s not as clear as we would have liked to have seen. It’s tied the districts hands in some ways, it’s tied the union’s hands in some ways … some think it’s pass-through money and others say they can do what they want so we hope that everything gets revisited soon …”

Snell said the teacher’s unions are about taking care of the teachers.

“If you have a union that’s responsible for wages for your group, then you need to change the model for more capacity,” said Snell. “The WEA forced the system to change the model. They created a crisis in the system that then prompts increased funding, that’s what the McCleary decision did, and so it disrupted this system and created a new system. I don’t know if WEA is worried about the system. They care about their teachers. The WEA is in charge right now. I understand there are forces at play with different interests.”

Snell calls it a conundrum.

“Raises caused this problem, but raises also retain amazing staff members,” said Snell. “Here we are. There’s a deficit. We’re trying to make good decisions. Good decisions are always challenging.”

Houle said, “The WEA’s mission is to strengthen public schools. And yes, the legislators need to continue fixing the law and decrease the havoc!”

Camas School
Camas High School 2018 Graduation ceremony.

Can this be resolved before layoffs happen?

Eighty-six percent of the CSD budget is personnel, and with the need to cut $8 million during the next school year, it’s likely dozens of teachers and staff will be laid off — if nothing changes.

“The legislature is listening. They talk about levy, about special education funding, and increasing that to help balance things,” said Snell. “The Governor’s budget has relief for us, but that’s just one component. What are the changes to the model for the 2019 year? We don’t know.”

Houle is spending today in Olympia.

“I am meeting with other WEA political action committee board members for a legislative update and for more training,” said Houle. “I was up there on Presidents’ Day lobbying and will be doing so again later this month. All in all, we want schools to remain a safe place for our students to learn. CEA will continue to lobby for increased special education funding, levy flexibility, and increased funding for safety (counselors, nurses, etc).”

With layoffs looming, was it right for the School Board to give Snell a 5 percent raise?

The school board approached Snell with a 5 percent raise offer, from December on.

“In my mind, it’s 3.1 percent because it started mid-year,” said Snell. “I have a $163,000 base salary. It’s an important job.”

What’s next?

Snell said the district leadership will be working closely with union leadership and talking to them about the process, and trying to be as transparent as possible knowing that it impacts the CSD fund balance. He said it’s essential to start to change the model, and that expenditures need to line up with income.

“What happens next is the committee develops considerations for me, and I will develop a budget and present it the school board,” said Snell. “This will happen at the end of April with the Legislature and we’ll then do our best guess to speculate what the Legislature will do, and then we’ll formally adopt it in August. Before all that, we have contractural obligations and we have notification dates for employees.”

“Non-personnel cuts includes supplies, travel, utilities, gas, buses, contracted services through special education,” said Snell. “There’s a lot there. We would probably look at a percent applied to those things. We need to realize savings to those costs. Look at extracurricular expenses, which are paid through levy and student fees. Do we hold those? In the short term, I don’t want to make decisions that remove programs. Our desire is to maintain programming. In year two or three if you see the revenue is not coming then you might have to reduce programming. Regarding buses, we try to keep on depreciation cycle because we get funds from the state.”

Camas, WA — “Go Green!” is the theme for the March First Friday in Downtown Camas on March 1! Lucky leprechauns, Eartha the Clown, a “Green Zone” featuring local green schools, green businesses and non-profits that care for the environment, and the wearing of the green will all be a part of this fun event. The event runs from 5-8 pm.

Included in the events will be World Vision, EOCF (Educational Opportunities for Children and Families), the CHS Green Team, The Master Gardeners, The Port of Camas/Washougal, Camp Windy HillIQ Credit UnionRepair Clark County there with all sorts of fun activities!

There will also be two Ribbon Cuttings!
Norris Arts Pottery Studio at 5pm
Pinnovate Boutique Spa at 5:30pm

Electronics Recycling — Eagle Scout Project

Come recycle your electronics at First Friday and help support a local Boy Scout! Zach Linn is working toward a Hornaday Award and is doing an Electronic Recycling Project. Bring your old cell phones, computer items, TVs, game consoles, CD Players, VHS and DVD players, etc. 5-8pm in Journey Church, 304 NE 4th.

Blender Bike Smoothies — Camas Bike and Sport

Green
Blender Bike Smoothies at Camas Bike and Sport.

Here is your chance to Go GREEN for First Friday by blending your own Squeeze and Grind nutritious smoothie by Camas Bikes Pedal Power! Come pedal to create your own smoothie! You can buy a reusable cup to fill with your delicious creation, too… reuse is to reduce! It’s green energy in action! This activity provides a way for people to use their own muscle power and instantly achieve a delightful and memorable result! Supplies will be limited, so come down early! The booth will be right outside Journey at 304 NE 4th.

Allan Jeffs Featured at Camas Gallery

Allan Jeffs
Allan Jeffs painting.

Local artist Allan Jeffs will be the featured artist at Camas Gallery during the First Friday Gallery Reception.  Allan has been a professional visual artist since 1994, and has participated in more than 40 international exhibitions in several countries in South America, Europe, United States, Caribbean and Antarctica.

His Land Art installation in Antarctica and research in creation of new techniques of Art and Microbiology have been highlighted in multiple conferences & papers. These proposals have been exhibited in contemporary art museums in Ecuador and Chile where his work is already part of the collections.

As a Muralist, Allan has developed several projects in Puerto Rico, Ecuador and the United States. One of his latest projects is the Street Art mural of Camas, Washington on Youngs Deli Wall (on 6th Ave). It is dedicated to the first pioneers and settlers of the Camas-Washougal area. 

Allan’s wife Rachel Zeigler, an accomplished vocalist, will be performing throughout the evening.

Join us and enjoy Allan’s incredible art and his wife’s beautiful voice! 408 NE 4th Avenue.


Artful Attic
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Find Green Art During Attic Galleries Reception!

Green
“Catching The Last Rays” by Amanda Houston.

Attic Gallery will host a First Friday reception March 1st, 5-8pm with the show “A Touch of Green” featuring artwork by many artists that include the color GREEN.

In keeping with the “Green” theme they will be serving  complimentary wine in cups made from plants.

Don’t forget about their temporary 20% off remodeling sale will continue until March 15th.


Legislation that would improve how the state identifies highly capable students unanimously passed the House Education Committee last week.

House Bill 1641, sponsored by Rep. Brandon Vick, would require school districts to develop an assessment, referral, and placement process for highly capable students.  Each student would be screened at least once prior to 6th grade. The legislation would also ensure students are able to receive transportation services to and from school.

“School districts are currently doing their best to identify and educate highly capable students, but the simple fact is, there are a large number of students who remain unidentified and are falling through the cracks. By standardizing the process across rich and poor districts, we should be able to identify the students who need and deserve the service,” said VickR-Vancouver. “Not only does House Bill 1641 benefit our highly capable students and their futures, but it will have a positive impact on our state’s economy and workforce.”

The legislation would:

  • Modify school district procedures related to identification, selection, and placement of highly capable students.
  • Direct the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction to designate staff to provide technical assistance and guidance to school districts regarding the Highly Capable Program.
  • Require that the state fund, and school districts provide transportation to and from programs for highly capable students.
  • Specify staff training requirements related to identifying and serving highly capable students.
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“Education is not one size fits all. What I am trying to accomplish with this legislation is ensure each student is getting the education they deserve regardless of their socio-economic status,” said Vick. “This legislation will assist in unlocking lifelong potential for our highly capable students. There should be no barriers or limits to what these students can accomplish in or outside the classroom.”

The bill now goes to the House Appropriations Committee.

The Legislature is scheduled to adjourn the 105-day legislative session on April 28.

Bellevue, WA — The Camas Girls Gymnastics team won their second consecutive State Championship Friday night at Sammamish High School, with a team score of 184.825, which is the third highest score in state history.

Camas sophomore Shea McGee finished first in the all-around with a score of 38.175 across four events.

Two other Papermakers medaled in the all-around — sophomore Alyssa Shibata (36.925, sixth) and freshman Peyton Cody (36.850, tied-eighth). A total of five Camas gymnasts advanced to individual finals (top-16 ) on Saturday morning.

McGee finished first in the vault with a 9.750 in the team’s last event of the day. With their rotation completed, and knowing their overall score, they felt strongly they would earn their second consecutive title. Archrival Woodinville still had to finish, and would place second, five points behind Camas.

Camas also performed well during Saturday’s individual finals. McGee, Shibata, Cody, Olivia Bane, and Lili Ford arrived early ready to compete. Bane, who was to compete in Bars, injured her knee during a fall during warmups, which eliminated her from competition.

“As a team, everyone was just so amazing and so helpful,” said Ford. “I’ve never been in this experience before. It just felt so good!”

On floor, McGee placed third.

On bars, McGee placed second, and Cody fourth.

On vault, Ford placed third, while McGee placed eigth.

On beams, Shibata, McGee, and Ford placed second, third, and fourth, respectively.

Gymastics
Shea McGee on floor routine.

Coach Perspective

“Camas did so well because we were well prepared,” said Camas Head Coach, Carol Willson. “We peaked at the precise time. We are blessed to have athletes that are club gymnasts or in some gymnastics training year round and are still able to manage the grades, and juggle the schedule of late night practices to follow High School rules. We have incredible depth.

“Almost every one one of the gymnasts on the State roster are in multiple sports or activities ranging from Gymnastics, Crew, Cheer, Dance, Worship Ministry, Young Life, etc. They sacrifice a lot to make a State title happen and let WIAA gymnastics know now that Camas exists. Last year I had a lot of people asking ‘Where is Camas?’ and this year they knew we were the team to beat. We went in as not only defending champions but also with the highest team score at Districts. We also went in with the highest individual AA score in the State from Shea.”

Gymastics
From left: Camas coaches Tricia Hoppa and Carol Willson.

“Out of four AA competitors 3 were in the top 8 in the State. Camas has an amazing AD that expects accountability from his Coaches and athletes. I expect my gymnasts to be kind, gracious, and to serve their teammates. They have jobs to do and they do them.”

“This has become a well working machine. Joy and Madison will be missed not just for their gymnastics but for their ability to lead. Annika and Lizzy will continue in that role and are already tremendous leaders. Forty kids came together as one. Not by coincidence but by the leadership that I was able to put in place and empowered these Captains to thrive under and grow as young women. Grace and Morgan bring the quiet lead-from-behind spirit. All of the kids go the second mile.”

“There is a deep heart connection with these kids. They bring out the best in myself and Tricia and the best in their teammates. 24 routines competed, 24 routines with not one fall. 20 10.0 start values…just amazing. Hours spent on team building and cohesive development added to their super hero ability and each of them owning their job! In watching these kids mature they will be bright stars among their generation. I am a better person having the amazing opportunity to Coach them.”

Artful Attic
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Scores

TEAM SCORES — 1, Camas 184.825; 2, Woodinville 179.850; 3, Newport 176.200; 4, Mead 172.450.
ALL-AROUND (final)—1, Shea McGee (Camas) 38.175; 2, Rylye Anderson (Puyallup) 37.700; 3, Ellie Mann (Woodinville) 37.450; 4, Ashley Yang (Kentwood) 37.250; 5, Hailey Kunimura (Auburn Riverside) 37.025; 6, Alyssa Shibata (Camas) 36.925; 7, Cecelia Loudermilk (Kentlake) 36.900; T8 Maddie LoMauro (Newport) 36.850; T8, Peyton Cody (Camas) 36.850.

Event scores (top-16 advance)
VAULT—1, Shea McGee (Camas) 9.750; 2, Ashley Yang (Kentwood) 9.525; 3, Maddie LoMauro (Newport) 9.500; T4, Rylye Anderson (Puyallup) 9.475; T4, Ellie Mann (Woodinville) 9.475; T4, Lili Ford (Camas) 9.475; 7, Emma Rochleau (Tahoma) 9.450; 8, Emily Yang (Kentwood) 9.400. Other locals: T15, Kayja Jacques (Union) 9.200; 21, Peyton Cody (Camas) 9.125; 26, Anna Sugarman (Skyview) 9.050; T27, Alyssa Shibata (Camas) 9.000; 30, Olivia Chou (Skyview) 8.925; 31, Joy Marsh (Camas) 8.900; T33, Neely Simone (Union) 8.800; 44, Madison Martin (Camas) 8.725; 91, Mackenzie Ridgway (Union) 7.800; 94, Alyssa Powell (Union) 7.550.

BEAM—1, Alyssa Shibata (Camas) 9.500; T2, Ellie Mann (Woodinville) 9.475; T2, Allina Hebling (University) 9.475; 4, Shea McGee (Camas) 9.450; 5, Hailey Kunimura (Auburn Riverside) 9.400; 6, Alyssa Hatch (Auburn Riverside) 9.250; 7, Rylye Anderson (Puyallup) 9.300; 8, Emma O’Toole (Rogers) 9.275. Other locals: 9, Mackenzie Ridgway (Union) 9.225; T12, Lili Ford (Camas) 9.175; T19, Peyton Cody (Camas) 9.050; T19, Morgan MacIntyre (Camas) 9.050; T22, Madison Martin (Camas) 9.000; T24, Kayja Jacques (Union)8.975; T51, Madison Schalk (Union) 8.525; T88, Riley LeCocq (Skyview)7.500; 93, Madison Summers (Skyview) 7.150.

FLOOR—1, Alyssa Hatch (Auburn Riv.) 9.650; 2, Samena Tate (Auburn Riv.) 9.625; 3, Ashley Yang (Kentwood) 9.600; T4, Shea McGee (Camas) 9.575; T4, Rylye Anderson (Puyallup) 9.575; T4, Ariana Martinez (Auburn Mountainview) 9.575; T4, Salina Mayanja (Bothell) 9.575; T4, Sophia Shawen (Mead) 9.575. Other locals: T16, Lili Ford (Camas) 9.425; T19, Mackenzie Ridgway (Union) 9.400; T24, Alyssa Shibata (Camas) 9.375; T28, Peyton Cody (Camas) 9.350; T28, Anna Sugarman (Skyview) 9.350; T35, Lizzy Wing (Camas) 9.300; T60, Kayja Jacques (Union) 9.075; T65, Joy Marsh (Camas) 9.000; 73, Madison Schalk (Union) 8.925; T86, Olivia Chou (Skyview) 8.350; 89, Riley LeCocq (Skyview) 8.300.

BARS—1, Cora Taylor (Bothell) 9.500; 2, Shea McGee (Camas) 9.400; 3, Anna Sugarman (Skyview) 9.375; 4, Rylye Anderson (Puyallup) 9.350; 5, Peyton Cody (Camas) 9.325; 6, Cecelia Loudermilk (Kentlake) 9.250; T7, Hailey Kunimura (Auburn Riverside) 9.225; 7T, Alexandria Thomas (Ferris) 9.225. Other locals: T11, Olivia Bane (Camas) 9.075; 14, Alyssa Shibata (Camas) 9.050; 28, Lili Ford (Camas) 8.475; 32, Mackenzie Ridgway (Union) 8.325; T33, Grace Alonzo (Camas) 8.275; 51, Madison Schalk (Union) 7.700; 79, Riley LeCocq (Skyview) 6.650; T80, Kayja Jacques (Union) 6.600.

Camas, WA – Camas-Washougal area residents have a growing local CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) community right in their backyard! With new ways to engage and purchase whole foods consumers may have questions regarding new and expanding choices. February 23 is National CSA Day and is a perfect time to feature all the local farms in the area. Additionally on March 10th, 10am-3pm at The Redd 831 SE Salmon St. Portland, Or. the Portland Area Community Supported Agriculture Coalition (PACSAC) is hosting a CSA Share Fare, an opportunity for consumers to meet and talk with local Farmers! 

CSA Memberships are a subscription to a season’s worth of sustainable, locally grown produce that is distributed to members throughout the harvesting season. It is a form of investment that allows small farmers to continue growing on a small scale that may not be sustainable without the CSA model. CSA members enjoy the quality of fresh fruits and vegetables for their family, while supporting their local farmer through their figurative and literal ‘seed’ money investments. Getting food from a CSA is different from going to a farmers market or using a grocery delivery service. As a CSA member, you make a seasonal commitment to a small farmer in your area, and the produce is either delivered to your door or you pick it up at a nearby distribution location. 

CSA members take pleasure in knowing where and how their food is grown, and typically have an open line of communication with their farmer. Building a relationship with your local farmer also changes your relationship with your food; you have a closer more informed view of how your food starts from simple seeds, and end up in your families’ bellies. Other simple, yet incredibly impactful benefits are, learning how to cook seasonally (and therefore more sustainably), introducing new healthful foods into your diet, and reducing the amount of fossil fuels used to transport your produce from farm to plate.

According to Small Farm Central’s CSA Farming Annual Report, the most popular time to join a CSA each year is at the end of February. To promote this important time for farmers, CSA Day was coined, and each year it falls on the last Friday in February. It’s an entire day dedicated to the celebration of community-supported agriculture, and CSA farmers enjoy an influx of sign-ups from members, which gives them revenue when they need it most for the growing season.

Community Supported Agriculture
Cabbage

Good Rain Farm (formally 50Fifty Farm) is now accepting applications for their 2019 season. To find out more about the farm—and fill out an application—visit www.goodrainfarm.wordpress.com, follow them on Facebook and Instagram @Goodrainfarm, or contact them at Goodrainfarm@gmail.com

You can find a listing of CSA’s offered in Clark County here: www.clarkcountygrown.org/csa which is hosted by SW Wa Slow Foods chapter. The Chapter also host monthly socials, 1st Wednesday 5-9pm at Brother’s Cascadia Brewing, where farmers often talk about their production practices, market barriers and what drives their passion to farm and feed their community.

Community Supported Agriculture
Fresh produce.