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Shelley Houle, President of the Camas Education Association (CEA) answered several questions about the upcoming Camas School District (CSD) layoffs.

22 FTE positions are being eliminated. Have all 22 teachers been notified?

As Superintendent Jeff Snell said it looks like most of those layoffs will be taken care of through attrition. Nobody has been contacted about being laid off, which happens on May 15. Human Resources has those details.

How will these layoffs affect the classroom?

It’s still a loss of FTE so I do fear it will impact students when we have less teachers overall. Classroom size could be impacted, but it will still be below what our cap is. It’ll depend on enrollment.

Did the budget committee make enough non-teacher cuts?

I was only there for half of the budget committee meetings. What we discussed is there shouldn’t be cuts in just one place. There was a shared vision that this would be done equally. I had two other members from CEA that were there, Jenelee Hurz (Math TOSA) and Miranda Jarrell (teacher at Dorothy Fox). We weren’t there to represent any special school or class type, we were there to be part of it, to listen and learn and to advocate for our members, and to advocate against impacts that affect children. We weren’t there to save particular jobs, and we had a student-focused approach to it. We spent many hours in with the committee, and I feel like we were well represented.

I’m disappointed that we don’t know the impact to SB5313 (bill that increases school levy lid) yet. I would loved to have pushed the pause button and see the impact of that levy lid. The May 15 date affected our decisions. Maybe some cuts will be reversed when we get more money from the levy lid.

Layoffs
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What happens with the levy lid in 2020? Will that help CSD?

That’s where the SB5313 could increase the capacity to collect what is already approved. I think we’re all waiting to see what that means. I predict there’s the potential to collect $6 million more dollars, but we have to be careful about what we ask our constituents to do. CSD has some hard decisions to make. We hope we can the reverse the cuts to be able to increase FTE in areas where we feel some negative impact from loss of teachers.

CSD is waiting for direction from OSPI.

Is Camas above the prototypical model?

Yes, because we use levy money because we do more than the state funds.

Did CEA ask for too much in raises last year?

No, it’s what our teachers deserved — a professional wage. If we go all the way back to August, we assumed layoffs would happen. This is because we go above and beyond the prototypical model. We want all of our members to stay and earn the wage for the work that they do.

Editor’s Note: This is what CEA Lead Negotiator, Mark Gardner said on September 3, 2018 regarding layoffs: https://youtu.be/Lu4DGMN5rl He didn’t think there would be layoffs but was concerned CSD was above a sustainable teaching staffing level.

Houle continues: The state really pulled a big one by changing the funding model. It really created a challenge for everyone to figure out how to best make it work. We would have loved an increase in special ed funding. You’re not fully funding education if you don’t fully fund special education. Jeff and I had shared Legislative priorities — funding for safety positions like counselors and nurses.

It was interesting going up there. I think progress was made in several of the bills. Delinking 10th graders passing the state tests was a good thing. They didn’t make complete fixes, though. Some needed changes were made like SB5313 with the levy flexibility will help many districts.

The number of 22 layoffs was not surprising to me because we did need to stay close to prototypical.

We’re all in this together. I feel that PSE (classified staff), CAEOP, and CAP (Gary Moller) are all part of this. We have a shared vision in that we wanted our students to be minimally impacted by those decisions.

Legislation that would improve how the state identifies highly capable students unanimously passed the House Education Committee last week.

House Bill 1641, sponsored by Rep. Brandon Vick, would require school districts to develop an assessment, referral, and placement process for highly capable students.  Each student would be screened at least once prior to 6th grade. The legislation would also ensure students are able to receive transportation services to and from school.

“School districts are currently doing their best to identify and educate highly capable students, but the simple fact is, there are a large number of students who remain unidentified and are falling through the cracks. By standardizing the process across rich and poor districts, we should be able to identify the students who need and deserve the service,” said VickR-Vancouver. “Not only does House Bill 1641 benefit our highly capable students and their futures, but it will have a positive impact on our state’s economy and workforce.”

The legislation would:

  • Modify school district procedures related to identification, selection, and placement of highly capable students.
  • Direct the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction to designate staff to provide technical assistance and guidance to school districts regarding the Highly Capable Program.
  • Require that the state fund, and school districts provide transportation to and from programs for highly capable students.
  • Specify staff training requirements related to identifying and serving highly capable students.
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“Education is not one size fits all. What I am trying to accomplish with this legislation is ensure each student is getting the education they deserve regardless of their socio-economic status,” said Vick. “This legislation will assist in unlocking lifelong potential for our highly capable students. There should be no barriers or limits to what these students can accomplish in or outside the classroom.”

The bill now goes to the House Appropriations Committee.

The Legislature is scheduled to adjourn the 105-day legislative session on April 28.

Washougal, WA — Washougal High School is celebrating Career and Technical Education (CTE) student successes and exploring training opportunities as a part of national CTE Month during February. 

“CTE Month gives us a platform to celebrate the value of CTE and the achievements and accomplishments of our CTE programs and students,” said Margaret Rice, WSD CTE Director.  “We want all students to be ready for their next steps after high school by facilitating the teaching of relevant skills and knowledge for learning, career and life.”

A goal of CTE education is to increase graduation rates and prepare students for employment by engaging them in learning related to career interests and workplace readiness with 21st Century skills.  According to the U.S. Department of Education, the average high school graduation rate for students concentrating in CTE programs is 93 percent, compared to an average national freshman graduation rate of 80 percent and 91 percent of high school graduates who earned 2-3 CTE credits enrolled in further education or training.

“There are many paths to a desired career and our job is to assist students in understanding those various paths, so they choose the best one to fit their needs,” Rice said.  “We believe all students, when provided the opportunity, will flourish in an environment that engages them in learning.  We strive to keep programs current by staying connected to what is happening in business and industry. Through this collaboration we can positively impact our students learning and their preparation for the world of work.”  

In order to align with State graduation requirements and to meet district goals of preparing students for their future, students are being asked to begin to build their High School & Beyond Plan in middle school. Student use program tools to learn more about their interests and learning styles which connect them to potential careers and determine a pathway.  This work begins at the middle school level in WSD.

Washougal School District CTE courses fit into a variety of the 16 National Career Cluster Pathways. Their courses include:

  • Intro to Culinary, Baking & Pastry, Advanced Culinary
  • American Sign Language
  • Family Health and Medical Detectives offered at the middle school with new classes at the high school in the Health Sciences pathway, which include Intro Med Careers & Term and Biomedical Body Systems, Applied Math, Basic Construction, FA Woodworking, Metals Crafts & Production, Metals Tech & Manufacturing, Small Engines as well as Design & Modeling, Automation & Robotics and Flight & Space offered at the middle school
  • Computer Applications, Yearbook, Leadership in Project Management, Financial Fitness, Digital Photography and a new class called Visual Design & Marketing

WHS senior, Dylan Van Horn, has a goal is to work as an American Sign Language Interpreter and is following the Education & Training pathway.  “The classes at WHS that helped me are ASL classes, Yearbook classes because of the interpersonal skills needed to interview people, and Leadership in Project Management (ASB),” he said.  VanHorne is also WHS Student Body President.  

“ASL Club has also helped along with Mrs. Ritchie and Mrs. Grant,” he said.  “The knowledge and support of these teachers has assisted me a lot in determining my path and helping me plan for my future.” In the fall, VanHorne will be attending Western Oregon University to major in American Sign Language/English Interpreting.

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Dylan Corbitt, a WHS senior, plans to work as a chef and is following the Hospitality & Tourism pathway

He has taken WHS Culinary Arts classes and the Cascadia Technical Academy Culinary, Baking & Pastry Program. “I am in an internship now at Nuestra Mesa in Camas,” he said.  “I work at Dish and Line Prep.”  Corbitt’s internship is a part of the Washougal Adult Transition Program.

WHS sophomore, Kirstyn Bisig, has selected her pathway as Architecture & Construction.  Her career goal is to be a Heavy Machine Operator.  “I am a member of SkillsUSA which has given me the opportunity to work with people I wouldn’t normally get to work with and learn more about the business-side of things,” she explained. “The WHS Metals and Wood classes helped as much as they could because there are age restrictions to operate heavy equipment.”

Wyatt Grindy, WHS sophomore, has chosen Transportation Distribution & Logistics as his pathway with a career goal to work as a Diesel Mechanic.  He has taken both WHS Metals and Small Engines classes. “Next year, I plan to attend the Diesel Technology Program at Cascadia Technical Academy to gain more skills and better prepare myself to be a Diesel Mechanic,” he said.  “Before I finish high school, I plan on getting an internship and use my skills and that connection to get a job after graduation.”

Additional CTE Month activities at WHS include opportunities for students to explore CTE programs available to them.  These included:

  • A field trip to the Cascadia Technical Academy
  • Clark College Professional Technology Day field trip
  • Construction Pre-apprenticeship Presentation by Clark College 
  • Professional Dress Day during the week of Feb. 11-15.
  • Lunch time activities such as “how to tie a tie”, Learn how to weld, CTE trivia, information about Leadership clubs
  • “Did you know” fact of the day posted on Facebook and in the morning announcements.

“We have packed a lot into the month for these students. We are so proud of the accomplishments of the students in our high school programs currently and can’t think of a better way to celebrate them than National CTE Month” said Rice.  “Our goal is to get the word out about the great work we do for and with kids, the amazing accomplishments of our current students as well as demonstrate what these classes can provide for our future students,” Rice said.

Washougal, WA – Pre-kindergarten children and their families in Washougal are being challenged by the General Federation of Women’s Clubs of Camas-Washougal to “Reach for the Stars with Books.”

“The goal of our program is to enrich the lives of young children through growth and learning skills prior to entering kindergarten and pursuing their academic journey,” said GFWC incumbent Vice President, Susan Bennett. “We received a grant from the Camas-Washougal Community Chest to purchase age-appropriate books, backpacks and other educational tools for children ages birth to five years old.”

GFWC members have now begun distribution of the educational materials. The group was on hand April 11th at Hathaway Elementary School to reward students and parents who have attended six visits to “1-2-3 Grow & Learn Program,” a free, drop-in, interactive and educational program for families with pre-kindergarten children. In addition to the educational materials, students receive a light blue T-shirt after attending their sixth session.

1-2-3 Grow and Learn is offered through ESD 112 for parents and children from birth to 5 years and teaches school readiness activities and gives parents a fun way to play and learn with their child. The program is located at several Clark County schools. GFWC Camas-Washougal is assisting with the program at Hathaway Elementary, 630 24 St., Washougal. The Hathaway program, under the leadership of Julie Jacobson, EDS 112, meets each Wednesday morning from 9:00-10:30 a.m. through June 6. The 1-2-3 Grow & Learn Program will resume at the start of the 2018-2019 school year.

The Community Chest grant received by the women’s club compliments the ESD 112 program well. “Reach for the Stars with Books” focuses on parent-child time,” Bennett explained. “These gifts for learning are a reward to help reinforce to both the parent and child the importance of attendance and structure at an early age.

“By putting books into the hands of children they will grow their school readiness skills and strengthen their social skills through interaction with other parents and children,” she said. “We believe these gifts will spark the children and parents’ imagination and take them on a journey of a lifetime!”

 

Books

Left to right – GFWC President Carol Styles, Bonnie Walden, Susan Bennett, GFWC Vice President Pat Suggs, Washington State GFWC President Tina Bair and Michelle Aguilar (Child Care Aware Manager Early Care & Education, ESD 112) with active 1-2-3 Grow and Learn participants in their new t-shirts.

By Dr. Marc Davis, DC

Anatomy, physiology, nutrition, biomechanics, orthopedics, spinal analysis, microbiology, geriatrics, cardiovascular disorders and toxicology.

Dr. Marc Davis

Dr. Marc Davis

These are just a few of the graduate level courses doctors of chiropractic-like Dr Davis – are required to successfully complete before entering into practice.

Requirements for Admission

Along with completing many other requirements before admission to chiropractic school, students must complete several pre-requisite college courses. These courses are the same as those required by medical schools.

This “pre-med” curriculum included courses in general chemistry, organic chemistry, physics, biology and psychology.

Chiropractic School Curriculum

In chiropractic school, Dr Davis received extensive and rigorous training. “Chiropractor colleges require a minimum of four academic years of professional resident study (not less than 4,200 clock hours), including clinical experience under strict supervision, preceded by a minimum of two years of college work with a curriculum concentrated in the biological and basic sciences, and clinical disciplines. The remaining two years emphasize practical or clinical studies dealing with the diagnosis and treatment of disease with approximately half the time spent in college clinics.”

The program of study at all chiropractic schools is divided into Basic and Clinical Sciences. The average total number of basic science contact hours is 1,420, which accounts for 30 percent of the entire chiropractic program. Basic sciences education includes an average of 570 hours of anatomy (40percent of all basic science hours), 305 hours of physiology (21 percent), 205 of pathology (14 percent), 150 hours of biochemistry (11 percent), 120 hours of microbiology (eight percent), and 70 hours of public health (five percent).

On average, 70 percent of the program is composed of clinical education. These schools devote an average of 3,380 contact hours to clinical education: 1,975 hours (58 percent) are spent in chiropractic clinical sciences and the remaining 1,405 hours (42 percent) are spend in clinical clerkships. These contact hours are in lectures, laboratories and clinics.

Evidence-based Practice

Chiropractic schools focus on teaching students to follow evidenced-based practice. This means adopting principles and clinical practices supported by research studies.

According to research, these students have a positive attitude toward evidence-based practice. One recent study pooled survey data from 674 students at 26 chiropractic schools in Australia, Canada, the US, Denmark and New Zealand participated. According to the report, “respondents generally agreed that the use of research evidence in chiropractic was important.” In total, 76% of respondents found it easy to understand research evidence and 81% had some level of confidence assessing the general worth of research articles (Chiropractic Manual Therapy 2011;3:6).

Don’t Let Imitators Fool You

The educational requirements for doctors of chiropractic, like Dr Davis, are specific to the practice. In contrast, the curriculum followed by other healthcare providers who practice spinal manipulation may consist of attending only one weekend-long seminar. This cursory training may fail to provide the essential skills necessary to safely and effectively perform spinal manipulations.

Chiropractors would not attempt to perform heart surgery or remove an appendix. They don’t have the training for such procedures. Medical doctors who offer spinal manipulations as “add on” service to their patients, similarly, may not have the necessary qualifications (unless they also have attended chiropractic school and have a chiropractic license).

Medical doctors aren’t the only ones who offer “chiropractic-like” services without the extensive educational background in chiropractic arts. Physical therapists have gotten on the copycat bandwagon, too. Again, without the proper educational background – including hands-on training – it’s a risky business. That’s why it is vitally important that you, as a patient, understand the educational differences between doctors of chiropractic, medical doctors and physical therapists when it comes to spinal manipulation.

History of Chiropractic Education

The word “chiropractic” is derived from the Greek words “cheir” and “praktkos,” meaning “done by hand.”

“From these simple beginnings, chiropractic became more sophisticated as a formal education program evolved, requirements by the schools were developed, and state and governing laws were established.” (American Chiropractic Association, 1999.)

The field of chiropractic has a long and rich history. “One of the earliest indications of soft tissue manipulation is demonstrated by the ancient Chinese Kong Fou Document written about 2700 B.C., which was brought to the Western World by missionaries.” (American Chiropractic Association, 1999.)

Chiropractic became more recognized in 1895 when Daniel David Palmer gave an ‘adjustment’ to what was felt to be a misplaced vertebra in the upper spine of a deaf janitor. Following the adjustment the janitor’s hearing was restored.

Holistic and Healthy

Chiropractors focus on the body’s muscular, nervous and skeletal systems – particularly the spine.

“Chiropractors believe interference with these systems impairs normal functions and lowers resistance to disease. They also hold that spinal or vertebral dysfunction alters many important body functions by affecting the nervous system, and that skeletal imbalance through joint or articular dysfunction, especially in the spine, can cause pain.” (Occupational Outlook Handbook.)

The inherent ability of the body to heal without the use of drugs or surgery is a foundational element of chiropractic. Drugs, whether over-the-counter or prescription, are the last line of defense – not the first. Doctors of chiropractic prefer holistic healing methods and gentle adjustments of the spine to relieve pain and stimulate health.

Continuing Education

US States, Canadian Provinces, Australian territories and regional governments in other countries have mandatory continuing education requirements to maintain or renew a license to practice chiropractic (Official Directory of the Federation of Chiropractic Licensing Boards).

Continuing education keeps chiropractors up-to-date on a wide range of chiropractic issues and principles. It also keeps them on the forefront of the latest research.

Gatekeepers

The Council on Chiropractic Education (CCE), based in Scottsdale, Ariz., is the agency recognized by the US Secretary of Education for accreditation of programs and institutions offering the doctor of chiropractic a degree.

Countries outside of the U.S. also have regulatory boards which exact high standards from practicing chiropractors.

The CCE and equivalent international institutions seek to insure the quality of chiropractic education by means of accreditation, educational improvement and public information.

The CCE’s rigid standards, adopted by the Federation of Chiropractic Licensing Boards, continue to insure the quality of its accredited programs and institutions.

Government organizations in countries throughout the world regulate the practice of chiropractic and grant licenses to chiropractors that meet their respective educational and examination requirements.

“Chiropractors can only practice in the States where they are licensed. Some States have agreements permitting chiropractors licensed in one State to obtain a license in another without further examination, provided that educational, examination , and practice credentials meet State specifications.”

You’re in Good Hands!

Doctors of chiropractic have the educational background and training necessary to assist you in obtaining a healthy and happy life.

By talking with patients and making research and information on a wide variety of topics available, this office is empowering you to learn all you can about your body, how it works, and how to heal it when it doesn’t.

Now that you have this knowledge, put it to good use and schedule an appointment for yourself. And, while you’re at it, schedule an appointment for a loved one as well. Information is power. Use it!

Optimal Health University™ is a professional service of PreventiCare Publishing®. The information and recommendations are appropriate in most instances. They are not, however, a substitute for consultation with a health-care provider such as Dr. Davis. Copyright, 2011.

Dr. Marc Davis adjusts patients at Davis Family Chiropractic, a thriving wellness-oriented office located next to Fred Meyer in Fisher’s Landing. For FREE monthly tips and community events subscribe to Dr. Davis’ blog “Health Naturally” by going to www.davisfamilychiro.com and clicking on “Blog”. To schedule a time to meet with Dr. Davis call (360) 823-2225. Mention “Lacamas Magazine” and “Free Scan” to get a free computerized Back and Neck Scan (regularly $210).

 

2415 SE 165TH Avenue, Suite 103

Vancouver, WA 98683

(360) 823-2225