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Washougal, WA — Jemtegaard Middle School (JMS) is the recipient of the 2019 Whole Child Award chosen by the Washington State Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. The Whole Child Award acknowledges and honors a school that makes significant contributions to student learning by creating a school culture with programs that exemplify two or more of the five tenets of The Whole Child Initiative: Healthy, Safe, Engaged, Supported, and Challenged; as well as serve as models for all educators across the state.  

“Our staff can think of no bigger honor than to be recognized for striving to meet the many needs of our kids,” said JMS Principal, David Cooke. “It takes a lot of work, but the results are worth it.”

JMS received their award at a school assembly on Wednesday, May 8, as well as a check for $500, sponsored by SHAPE Washington. 

“Equity and meeting the needs of the Whole Child is what drives the work of administrators, teachers, staff and community members at JMS,” said Cooke.  “We continue to listen and learn from our students so that we can improve to give each one the best chance of success. We focus strongly on equity and supporting the Whole Child.”  

Sustainable support protocol

JMS has a sustainable Student Support Protocol to foster a positive working relationship with peers and teachers for students to feel safe and supported in the classroom. Their Student Support Flowchart works to eliminate disruptive and/or off task behavior that can be damaging to the relationship between the student and teacher.

“Our primary process goals are to keep students in the learning environment as long as possible, allow teachers to keep teaching, even following problem behavior, and provide an opportunity for students to reflect on their behavior and have a voice in the refocus process,” Cooke said.

“The most effective way for students to learn is to be in the classroom with a quality teacher every day,” said Cooke. “With this new student support process, out of class time was reduced to five minutes for minor issues and up to 20 minutes for major issues for the majority of discipline referrals.”

As a result, this method is showing results with an 80 percent drop in disciplinary referrals this year, minimal suspensions and a high approval rating from staff. Many students with prior disciplinary referrals last school year are having minimal discipline concerns now. 

Restorative practices

Restorative practices also play an integral role in repairing relationships and restoring safety after bullying occurs.

“Traditionally, bullies were punished through exclusionary discipline,” said Cooke. “At JMS, we use restorative practices to bring all parties together so that the victim and family can explain how the bullying has impacted them and what they need from the student doing the bullying in order to feel safe.”

Their findings show that in 100 percent of bullying cases this year, with clear expectations and procedures for Restorative Circles used, none of the students violate the conditions after the meeting or continued bullying at JMS. Parents and guardians also appreciate the opportunity to meet each other and support all students.

“There are many people who support our mission including parents, community and educators across the district,” Cooke said. “As a team we have created a school that our students, staff and community can be proud of.”

Club 8 for students

An example of this teamwork is the Club 8 after-school program that helps keep students engaged in additional learning opportunities including arts, science, leadership activities, and more. The program is two years old and meets on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons. The name represents an 8th period of the school day for learning.

“The goal of this program is to address an equity issue related to lack of extracurricular opportunities for students on free and reduced lunch who don’t have access to transportation,” Cooke said.

Club 8 not only provides a bus ride home to remove the transportation barrier but provides all students an afternoon snack. The program regularly has around 90 students in attendance for a school just over 500 (not including 7th and 8th grade athletics with 40-70 students per season.) The list of Club 8 opportunities continues to grow along with community support.

Community service with students

Adding to the positive culture of JMS, the entire student body works on community service projects. Students pick the project that interests them the most which includes building bird houses for local parks, making animal toys for a local shelter, creating positive posters to hang on the hall walls, and helping run games at the elementary school recess and more. 

“I’m proud of the hard work the Jemtegaard school staff and community does to educate the whole child,” said WSD Superintendent, Dr. Mary Templeton. “They have embarked on a journey to shift the culture of the school, focusing on identifying ways students may fall through the cracks, and ways in which they can provide resources to keep students engaged in learning, encourage safe choices, and provide students with the problem solving skills to succeed in the classroom and beyond.” 

Founded in 1956, as Washington State Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, now known as Washington State ASCD, is a community of all educators committed to promoting promising practices to ensure ALL students are safe, healthy, engaged, supported and challenged.

Washougal, WA — The former Heller’s, long a staple of Washougal, is now Washougal Times.

The new owner, Ben Jackson, took ownership on January 2, and he and his team have spent considerable time and money renovating the space.

Their grand opening is this weekend, April 12-14. Friday and Saturday nights will be filled live music, by Train River Blue Grass, which is a 4-piece band from 7:30-10 pm. They’ll have a customized menu for a large volume of people with over a dozen choices.

“We’re an ode to the community and the history of the community,” said Jackson. “After spending time in the 2 Rivers Heritage Museum we have gone back to 1890 to 50 years ago, and we’re showing the rich history. We’ve had a lot of people come in and identify people — there’s my mom and there’s my dad, and they’ve given me more photos of the history.”

“There is plenty of room on the walls for more times to come. The business is about something for everyone in the community. Something for kids, for families. Heller’s legacy is strong. Their 40-plus years of business they did was something else. Also, trying to make sure we offer up new things, but maintain some of that old feel of what Heller’s was because it was great. That’s why we do Prime Rib on Friday’s and Saturday’s, that’s why we have the Heller’s sign up.”

Washougal Times
Enjoy a delicious burger with onion rings.

Food wise, Washougal Times is simply American done well. It’s splashed in with Pacific NW ingredients with burgers, BLT’s, meatloaf specials, Copper River Salmon, fresher ingredients that are all around us. It’s about looking at what the community needs, so they’ve create menus around that. Then as the community changes the menu will change, as well.

“We want to make sure we’re paying attention,” said Jackson. “We offer comment cards with each guest and chat with them about their experience. We don’t want people walking out the door unhappy. What can we do to make that right?”

The symbol that’s above the restaurant represents rushing water, which is why it’s in blue. Washougal Times is all about the community and the history and the times of this area.

“On the marquee we have the slogan drink, eat, repeat,” said Jackson. “Come visit.”

Hours: 11 am – 10 pm Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Sunday. Open until 11 pm on Fridays and Saturdays. Closed Monday.

Located at 1826 E Street, Washougal, WA 98671

Visit www.WashougalTimes.com

Washougal, WA — Washougal area artists are once again opening their studio doors to offer a fascinating and art-filled family outing for Mother’s Day weekend.  The 2019 Washougal Studio Artists Tour, to be held May 11-12 from 10 am to 5 pm, will include 11 stops and features 19 local artists representing a vast array of creative works and mediums.

“We were delighted with the success of our first tour last year,” said Angela Ridgway, mixed media metal artist and event coordinator. “We received great interest and support from the local community and welcomed many visitors from the Portland area and beyond.  Some on the tour were discovering Washougal for the first time.”

The Washougal area has long been a hidden wealth of high-quality professional artists.

“I was thrilled last year that so many artists wanted to participate in the tour,” Ridgway said.  “Being invited into an artist’s studio is a wonderful way for the public to see where the magic of creating art happens and learn about both the art and the artists.”

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The tour route, which winds along the scenic Washougal River and through the Washougal foothills, is nearly as beautiful as the art found in the studios. 

“We heard many compliments from visitors last year on how scenic the tour drive was,” said Ridgway.  “Washougal is such a beautiful place that it is no wonder it attracts and inspires so many talented artists.” 

Adding to the tour experience, many artists will be conducting demonstrations of their artistic process.  A list of participants and a schedule is located on the event website at www.WashougalStudioArtists.org

Featured tour artists are: Angela Ridgway, mixed media metal; Anna Norris, oils and acrylics; Anna Wiancko-Chasman, clay/mixed media; Anni Furniss, acrylic painting; Char McHugh, ceramics; Charlene Hale, glass, ceramic, pen  and ink; Chris Brodigan, functional ceramic art; Cyndee Starr, mixed media; Deborah Roberts, watercolor, colored pencils, pastels; John Furniss, woodworking; Kathy Beckman, acrylic and multimedia on canvas; Kathy Marty, handwoven eco-friendly rugs; Katy Fenley, sterling silver, glass, and gemstone jewelry; Sharon L Ballard, acrylic paintings; Shirley Bishop, fused glass; Suzanne Grover, pastels, watercolor, mixed media; Tamara Dinius, mixed media; Toni McCarthy, original beaded jewelry; Tracy Simpson, encaustic, oil, jewelry.

Preview their work and see the tour map on the Washougal Studio Artists website.   You may also follow them on Facebook and Instagram.  Participating artists will also have copies of the map available, as well as many local businesses.

Washougal Studio Artists Tour is sponsored in part by the City of Washougal hotel/motel tourism tax fund.

Artist
Artist Shirley Bishop.
Artist
Artist Ani Furniss.

Washougal, WA — Dr. Mary Templeton, Washougal School District (WSD) Superintendent, was recently selected a 2018-19 “Superintendent to Watch” by the National Schools Public Relations Association.  She will be recognized this summer at the 2019 NSPRA Seminar in Washington D.C. with the 14 other honorees from around the nation.

The award recognizes district leaders with less than five years of experience as a superintendent who exemplify dynamic, fast-paced leadership with strong communication at its core.  Templeton was hired in Washougal in July of 2018 and is a first-time superintendent. She previously worked as a teacher for 15 years and an administrator in Spokane for the last 11.

“Communication is critical for letting our stakeholders know about the great things that are happening in our schools,” said Templeton. “It is exciting to help Washougal rise to become one of the top performers in the state of Washington.”

“I couldn’t be more pleased with the transformational leadership, community engagement, and relationship building Mary is engaged in,” said Cory Chase, WSD Board President, in a letter of recommendation sent in support of Templeton’s nomination.  “She has demonstrated dynamic leadership, fast-paced decision making, and shown the value of strong communications in the district’s efforts. I’m proud of our district and am certain that Mary is on the right track to help us achieve great things.”

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In his letter he went on to site examples of Templeton’s efforts including her connections with civic groups, parents and staff, her work to lead development of a new strategic plan, and her communications efforts during and at the conclusion of bargaining with the local teacher union.

“As one of several new superintendents in the region this year, Mary quickly became a highly respected leader among her peers,” said Tim Merlino, Superintendent Educational Service District 112 in his letter of
recommendation. “Her knowledge and passion for education, coupled with a dynamic energy and warmth, has made her one of the ‘go-to’ superintendents in Southwest Washington.”

He went on to point out that Templeton’s style of “leading through listening” is a quality greatly admired by the more than 400 WSD employees she guides.

“Mary effectively utilizes all communication strategies, both new technologies and traditional vehicles, to reach her audiences,” he said. “While her involvement in big-picture state-level education issues is admirable, she also takes time to visit one-on-one with a variety of stakeholders. She has made it her number one priority to get to know staff, parents and community members through conversations and in informal settings. She is always present in schools, hallways, classrooms, and athletic and performing arts events.”

“Our future is bright in Washougal,” said Templeton.  “And with a continued focus on communication, we will make sure the community is involved with us as we exceed our own expectations and aspire toward excellence.”

Washougal, WA – The Two Rivers Heritage Museum reopened their doors March 1 to welcome visitors after their annual four-month closure for maintenance and display enhancements.  

“Winter is always a busy time for us,” said Camas-Washougal Historical Society President, Jim Cobb.  “Even though the museum is closed for guests, we have a lot cleaning, repairing and reorganizing to do to keep it looking good and our exhibits fresh.” 

In addition to new displays, a more modern security system was installed and additional space in the basement was organized for accessioning and curator work. 

One of the new exhibits is called “OH, Teddy!” and as might be expected, features Teddy bears. 

“While inventorying we found that we have lots and lots of dolls and Teddy bears,” said Karen Johnson, accessions volunteer and Oh Teddy curator. 

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Most of the collection came from the estate of Barbara Heriford, a local collector who had visions of opening a doll shop before she passed away.

“We decided it would be fun to replace the old toy exhibit and bring out these bears that had been packed away for so many years,” said Johnson. “All we had was a list, so we went to work locating them all.  It was a matter of pawing through boxes to find what we had.  It was actually pretty fun. You’d open a box and say, ’Oh, look what I found!’ Each box you opened it was like ‘oh look, oh look, oh look!’  The bears are all so different and cute.”

The process then took more than a month to decide which bears to display and figure out how best to show them. “We have so many bears we could not just line them up in a row,” said Johnson.  “I did research online to see how other Teddy bear exhibits were set up. I saw an exhibit from Japan which is the inspiration for the tight packed bears in the glass case we have now.” 

Since the bears were mostly from a collection, there was not a lot of story behind each of them.  So, Johnson decided to tell the story of the how stuffed toy bears became known as Teddy Bears.

“It is quite an interesting story,” Johnson teased. “It all started with a bear hunting trip President Theodore Roosevelt took in 1902. That is all I’ll say.  I’d like to invite visitors to come in to learn the rest!”

To help explain the Teddy bear story, Sunni Lambert, a 4th grade student at Cape Horn-Skye Elementary, was recorded telling its history so it could be played back for guests at a push of a button.  “Sunni did a great job and her recorded sweet voice telling this story helps to bring the exhibit to life,” Johnson said.

Another new display “Toys That Teach,” is a thoughtful and fun look at toys through the past that educated through play.  “It is an interesting display and we think it will engage conversation,” Johnson said. Retired contractor and teacher, Walt Eby, curated the exhibit.

Museum
Teddy Bears!

“Window to Our Past” is also new this year. Curated and created by Ivar Godtilbsen, the museum’s new computer network and support administrator features old pictures and QR codes. “It’s a new way of engaging our visitors,” explained Johnson.  “They can use their smart phones with a QR code App to learn intriguing stories behind some interesting pictures from our photo collection.”

The Two Rivers Heritage Museum is located at 1 Durgan Street in Washougal and open March through October.  Regular hours are Thursday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.  Admission costs are $5 for adults, $4 for seniors, $2 for students and free for children under 5 and all CWHS members.  Group tours are available any day of the week (by appointment only).  Call 360-835-8742 for scheduling. 

Once again, to celebrate spring break, students may visit the museum for free April 4-6.  They must be accompanied by an adult.

CWHS representatives will be at the April First Friday, on April 5, in downtown Camas in the lobby of Journey Church.  They will have interesting local artifacts and information about the work progressing on the Gathering Place at Washuxwal project. 

“Our community has so much to be proud of in this museum,” Cobb said.  “We hope local folks who have not had a chance to see the museum will stop in and look around at all we have to offer.”

CWHS is always looking for volunteers and new members to join and help support the preservation of local history. More information about the CWHS and the Two Rivers Heritage Museum can be found on their website at www.2rhm.com.

Washougal, WA — Art can tell a story.  It can inspire, move or add beauty and interest to a place.  The new metal sculpture panels installed on the wall of the shared courtyard at Jemtegaard Middle School and Columbia River Gorge Elementary School provide all of that and more.  The piece features beautiful and whimsical details cut as silhouettes into three stainless steel panels to tell stories of the Washougal area and Columbia River Gorge.

“Roots and Wings” was created by New York artist and a native of France, Béatrice Coron, through grant funding from the Washington Arts Commission.  “Whenever Washington State funds new construction, by law, half-of-one-percent of funding is set aside for the commissioning of new artwork,” said Marissa Laubscher, Washington State Arts Commission Art in Public Places Project Manager. “Washougal School District applied to ArtsWA for the funded art project through a competitive pooling process. They were awarded a $60,000 project. This budget covered all of the costs associated with the artist selection, design, engineering, fabrication, transportation, and installation of the artwork.”

Coron was on-hand to oversee the installation on March 12 and then spoke to students from both schools in assemblies the next morning. Using a Powerpoint presentation, she described her creative process and the inspiration behind her work on this piece. 

First, she explained the name, “Roots and Wings.”  

“You are so lucky to have your roots in such a beautiful place to enjoy, experience and explore,” said Coron. “And your education at school is what will give you wings.  They will take you wherever you want to go.”

“When I was awarded this work, the first thing I did was research,” she explained. “I visited and spent two days looking around the area for ideas and inspiration.  They were beautiful, warm, blue-sky days.  I took many pictures of all the sites and was amazed by the natural beauty here.” 

ArtsWA
Artist Beatrice Coron.

She told of traveling to area vistas to experience the incredible views of mountains and the river. 

“I climbed Beacon Rock,” she said. “I looked at your trees and animal life and saw all the outdoor activities you enjoy such as camping, skiing, fishing, motocross, horseback riding and hiking. I visited the petroglyphs tunnel downtown and learned about local history including Native Americans, Lewis and Clark, steam boats and farming.  There are so many stories tell.” 

Coron created sketches from her photos and the stories began to emerge, and she challenged students to take the time to study each unique panel.

“Find stories so you can tell others what you see,” she said. “And be sure to ask them what stories they see.”  She was sure to include images of both huskies and otters, the schools’ mascots.  You must look closely to find the sasquatch and a Corgi.  

The piece also features several silhouetted images of young people curled up reading books.

“It is like you begin as a worm and then a cocoon,” she said.  “From this reading and education, you will get your wings.” 

Mounted just outside the main panels, as if escaping, are children with butterfly wings. 

“Your wings will take you far,” promised Coron. 

“Beatrice has captured the spirit of Washougal,” said David Cooke, JMS principal.  “When you look at her work you experience the story of how the local community, resources and natural beauty play a significant role in the positive development of our kids.”

“Washougal School District’s local art selection committee worked with ArtsWA to set the initial goals for this project, selected the artist, and worked with her to provide feedback and context as she designed this artwork,” said Laubscher. “They were looking for artwork that would represent the natural beauty of Washougal and the Columbia River Gorge and interconnectedness of nature, school, students, and the community.”  

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The committee members included Cooke; Tracey MacLachlan, CRGE principal; Dani Allen, JMS art teacher; Sarah Howe, CRGE Parent; Kori Kelly, Superintendent’s assistant; Stephanie McGarvie, art teacher; Joe Steinbrenner, WSD facilities director and Amy Switzer, CRGE music teacher.

“It was an absolute pleasure to work with Beatrice,” said MacLachlan.  “She had such a presence, as we met and got to work with her.  Her professionalism as an artist, and her knowledge for her craft was remarkable.  The attention to the details and the research she accomplished for the project were unprecedented.”

“Roots and Wings“ joins more than 4,600 artworks in the State Art Collection, which is located in more than 1,200 schools and state agencies across Washington State. Unlike art collections you might find in a museum, the State Art Collection is chosen by community representatives and is sited in places where people study, live, work, and play.

When Coron was asked by a student to name her favorite art creation, she admitted it was an impossible question to answer.  “So, I must say, my next one,” she said with a laugh.

A section of “Roots and Wings.”

About the Artist

After briefly studying art at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts of Lyon, and Mandarin Chinese at the Université of Lyon III, Coron experienced life with a series of odd jobs. She has been, among others, a shepherdess, truck driver, factory worker, cleaning lady and a New York City tour guide. Coron has lived in France (her native country), Egypt and Mexico for one year, each and China for two years. She moved to New York in 1985 where she reinvented herself as an artist.

Coron’s works includes illustration, book arts, fine art and public art. She cuts her characteristic silhouette designs in paper and Tyvek. She also creates works in stone, glass, metal, rubber, stained glass and digital media.

Her work has been purchased by major museum collections, such as the Metropolitan Museum, The Walker Art center and The Getty. Her public art can be seen in subways, airport and sports facilities among others.

You can visit her website at: http://beatricecoron.com/

Cut Stories Statement from Béatrice Coron

For the last 20 years, I have been exploring visual storytelling in artist books, paper cutting and public art. Collecting memories from individuals and communities, I stage narrative allegories in silhouette to create a dialogue with the viewer in playful fantasies.

These visual chronicles record archetypal stories that transcend time and space. My goal is to invite the public to pause and bring their own ideas finding personal interpretation to reclaim their imaginative powers.

My personal history fueled my curiosity for stories and questioned my perception of realities. I have been fascinated by the relation of people to their space and the sense of belonging. Using papercutting where everything is cut from a single piece of Tyvek, the profusion of individual stories makes a coherent whole world.

Written by Rene Carroll

ARTSWA
The art is on display at at CRGE/Jemptegaard MS courtyard.
ArtsWA
Beatrice Coron’s art work was installed at the CRGE/Jemptegaard courtyard.

WASHOUGAL, WA — The Washougal Schools Foundation announces the winner of the event logo contest for the 16th Annual Student Stride for Education fun run. The winning artwork, featuring a smiling, round faced Stride Cat, was created by Dakota Duncan, a sixth-grader at Jemtegaard Middle School.  There were 23 entries from Washougal middle schools including JMS, Canyon Creek and Mt. Pleasant.

“Washougal Schools Foundation Student Stride for Education presents a unique opportunity for students to shine and not just on the race course,” said Stephanie Eakins, Event Director. “Long before the actual Stride event, our art contest runs from October to December and is open to all Washougal middle school students. Each year student creativity shines through in their art submissions. Each year brings new ideas and possibilities.”

This year’s cat was selected for its uniqueness that designers recognized would translate well to promotional materials. The Stride logo will also be featured on race t-shirts and promotional materials distributed throughout the community.

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The 16th annual Student Stride for Education will take place on Saturday, May 18th at Washougal High School’s Fishback Stadium. Race day registration opens at 7:15 am with the 5K Run starting at 8:00 am. Participants can register individually or as teams online atwww.washougalschoolsfoundation.org/stride or www.discoverydentistry.com

The WSF Stride has become a popular community event filled with healthy exercise, including an adult 5K run/walk and elementary school runs for each class from kindergarten through fifth grade. The event is the primary fundraising activity for the Washougal Schools Foundation, which is dedicated to enhancing the quality of public education and improving the lives of children in Washougal. The Foundation uses the proceeds of the WSF Stride for classroom grants and college scholarships.

About the Washougal Schools Foundation

The Washougal Schools Foundation seeks to enhance the quality of public education, helping to prepare students to constructively participate in the improvement of the community. The foundation offers Creative Classroom Grants in the Fall and Spring for projects up to $1,000 to teachers, staff, students, or community members. Mini-grants are offered throughout the year as well, each providing up to $250 to teachers for materials and programs. The foundation also awards Scholarships to select seniors graduating from the District. To learn more about the foundation and its contribution to the community, visit washougalschoolsfoundation.org

Washougal, WA – Washougal School District and Washougal Arts and Culture Alliance have collaborated to shine a spotlight on student art throughout March, which is recognized nationally as Youth Art Month.

“The arts are an important element of our students’ education in Washougal,” said Mary Templeton, WSD Superintendent. “Student exposure and participation in both fine arts and performance arts are essential to educating the whole child.” Research indicates that high-quality art educational opportunities can improve critical-thinking skills and even help to foster important values such as empathy and acceptance.

Washougal Youth Arts Month is made possible through partnerships with area artists, Washougal Community Education, Washougal Public Library, Washougal Schools Foundation and more.  Students will have opportunities to make and display art throughout the events and activities planned all month long.   

WYAM will culminate with the Washougal Youth Arts Month Gallery, at Washougal Town Square in downtown Washougal, March 27-295pm to 7pm and Saturday, March 30 from 1pm to 5pm

“Washougal school district began offering fine art classes to all elementary students this school year and the students are excited to display their pieces for the community,” said Alice Yang, Cape Horn-Skye Art Teacher.  “The level of creativity shown by our youth is impressive!”  

The Washougal elementary classes join the robust fine and performance arts programs at the middle and high school levels.  The gallery will also include works by WHS Career and Technical Education students with photography, metal and wood pieces.  WHS Culinary Arts students will supply artistically created sugar cookies using cutter designs made with the school’s 3-D printer.  A variety of school band and choir concerts will be performed in March and a Drama Camp run by WHS drama students as a fundraiser is available to elementary students.

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Washougal Community Education is offering a variety of classes. 

“We are pleased to have some new art opportunities for our students, and parents, to explore their creative side,” said Kathy Douglas-Evans, Washougal Community Education.  The Paint Roller and Washougal glass artist, Shirley Bishop, stepped up to provide these new, creative classes for youth.  They include glass fusing, rock and face painting, and kids and family canvas painting.  Register on the Washougal Community Education webpage at www.washougal.k12.wa.us/wcer Pieces created in these classes will be on display at 54-40 Brewing and Washougal Coffee Company at the end of the March. 

As a part of WYAM, WACA is inviting all Washougal students to participate in a fun photography challenge.  “We’re asking them to grab their smartphone or digital camera and share through photography the beautiful public art in the City of Washougal,” said Susan Warford, WACA Board member.  “We want them to find unique angles, use interesting lighting, include family or friends, have fun and be creative!”  Images will be shared on the WACA website and FB pages.  For details and student release form go to http://washougalarts.org 

Other community partners are the Washougal Public library, offering a free live concert, chalk art, pottery and crafts and Washougal School of Music, who is hosting a community recital showcasing the talents of their students as well as those of local music teacher, Chuck Carpenter. 

Washougal Youth Arts Month will receive formal recognition from both the City of Washougal and Washougal School Board.  On February 25, Mayor Molly Coston will sign a proclamation declaring March Youth Arts Month in Washougal. The Washougal School Board of Directors will issue a resolution supporting Youth Arts Month on February 26 at their regularly scheduled meeting.  Youth Art Month started in 1961 when the Council for Art Education and National Art Education Association named March as Youth Art Month to recognize art education and the value of art to create a better quality of life for all people. 

For a full list of scheduled activities and events throughout the month of March, go to http://www.washougal.k12.wa.us/

Art
Working on projects.

Washougal, WA — Washougal High School is celebrating Career and Technical Education (CTE) student successes and exploring training opportunities as a part of national CTE Month during February. 

“CTE Month gives us a platform to celebrate the value of CTE and the achievements and accomplishments of our CTE programs and students,” said Margaret Rice, WSD CTE Director.  “We want all students to be ready for their next steps after high school by facilitating the teaching of relevant skills and knowledge for learning, career and life.”

A goal of CTE education is to increase graduation rates and prepare students for employment by engaging them in learning related to career interests and workplace readiness with 21st Century skills.  According to the U.S. Department of Education, the average high school graduation rate for students concentrating in CTE programs is 93 percent, compared to an average national freshman graduation rate of 80 percent and 91 percent of high school graduates who earned 2-3 CTE credits enrolled in further education or training.

“There are many paths to a desired career and our job is to assist students in understanding those various paths, so they choose the best one to fit their needs,” Rice said.  “We believe all students, when provided the opportunity, will flourish in an environment that engages them in learning.  We strive to keep programs current by staying connected to what is happening in business and industry. Through this collaboration we can positively impact our students learning and their preparation for the world of work.”  

In order to align with State graduation requirements and to meet district goals of preparing students for their future, students are being asked to begin to build their High School & Beyond Plan in middle school. Student use program tools to learn more about their interests and learning styles which connect them to potential careers and determine a pathway.  This work begins at the middle school level in WSD.

Washougal School District CTE courses fit into a variety of the 16 National Career Cluster Pathways. Their courses include:

  • Intro to Culinary, Baking & Pastry, Advanced Culinary
  • American Sign Language
  • Family Health and Medical Detectives offered at the middle school with new classes at the high school in the Health Sciences pathway, which include Intro Med Careers & Term and Biomedical Body Systems, Applied Math, Basic Construction, FA Woodworking, Metals Crafts & Production, Metals Tech & Manufacturing, Small Engines as well as Design & Modeling, Automation & Robotics and Flight & Space offered at the middle school
  • Computer Applications, Yearbook, Leadership in Project Management, Financial Fitness, Digital Photography and a new class called Visual Design & Marketing

WHS senior, Dylan Van Horn, has a goal is to work as an American Sign Language Interpreter and is following the Education & Training pathway.  “The classes at WHS that helped me are ASL classes, Yearbook classes because of the interpersonal skills needed to interview people, and Leadership in Project Management (ASB),” he said.  VanHorne is also WHS Student Body President.  

“ASL Club has also helped along with Mrs. Ritchie and Mrs. Grant,” he said.  “The knowledge and support of these teachers has assisted me a lot in determining my path and helping me plan for my future.” In the fall, VanHorne will be attending Western Oregon University to major in American Sign Language/English Interpreting.

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Dylan Corbitt, a WHS senior, plans to work as a chef and is following the Hospitality & Tourism pathway

He has taken WHS Culinary Arts classes and the Cascadia Technical Academy Culinary, Baking & Pastry Program. “I am in an internship now at Nuestra Mesa in Camas,” he said.  “I work at Dish and Line Prep.”  Corbitt’s internship is a part of the Washougal Adult Transition Program.

WHS sophomore, Kirstyn Bisig, has selected her pathway as Architecture & Construction.  Her career goal is to be a Heavy Machine Operator.  “I am a member of SkillsUSA which has given me the opportunity to work with people I wouldn’t normally get to work with and learn more about the business-side of things,” she explained. “The WHS Metals and Wood classes helped as much as they could because there are age restrictions to operate heavy equipment.”

Wyatt Grindy, WHS sophomore, has chosen Transportation Distribution & Logistics as his pathway with a career goal to work as a Diesel Mechanic.  He has taken both WHS Metals and Small Engines classes. “Next year, I plan to attend the Diesel Technology Program at Cascadia Technical Academy to gain more skills and better prepare myself to be a Diesel Mechanic,” he said.  “Before I finish high school, I plan on getting an internship and use my skills and that connection to get a job after graduation.”

Additional CTE Month activities at WHS include opportunities for students to explore CTE programs available to them.  These included:

  • A field trip to the Cascadia Technical Academy
  • Clark College Professional Technology Day field trip
  • Construction Pre-apprenticeship Presentation by Clark College 
  • Professional Dress Day during the week of Feb. 11-15.
  • Lunch time activities such as “how to tie a tie”, Learn how to weld, CTE trivia, information about Leadership clubs
  • “Did you know” fact of the day posted on Facebook and in the morning announcements.

“We have packed a lot into the month for these students. We are so proud of the accomplishments of the students in our high school programs currently and can’t think of a better way to celebrate them than National CTE Month” said Rice.  “Our goal is to get the word out about the great work we do for and with kids, the amazing accomplishments of our current students as well as demonstrate what these classes can provide for our future students,” Rice said.

Washougal, WA — Hathaway Elementary students took steps to understand healthy living at the Sodexo Student Well-Being Fair held Tuesday, January 22.

“The purpose of the event was to promote good nutrition, get the students to stop and think about the path that food takes from the field to the table, and to have FUN along the way,” said Mark Jasper, Sodexo Nutrition Services Director at Washougal School District.  “This was an interactive wellness fair concept, which fully supports our mission of inspiring lifelong healthy habits in the children we serve.”

The all-day event featured grade level groups spending an hour moving through four presentations targeted at expanding their knowledge of various aspects of a healthy life and well-being.  Topics covered were related to Nutrition, Achievement, Environment, Community and Activity. “Each station presented meaningful information that captivated the students,” said Jasper. “And, as an added bonus, as the students left the event, they were given a bag to remind them of what they learned.”

“I was happy to bring this event back this year for all of our students,” said Hathaway Principal Sarika Mosley. It was so engaging for students and Mark Jasper is so organized in bringing in his presenters. I had a second grader tell me afterwards that coconuts have juice in them! Watching our students create balanced meal plans for breakfast, lunch and dinner is important for their long-term health and well-being.”

Assisting in the event by leading presentations were Shelby Stanford, Dietitian Intern; Stacie Reiter, Sodexo’s Regional RD; Ellen Ives, Educator for Sustainability and Waste Reduction from Waste Connections; and Laycee Hyde, Sodexo Operations Manager form Forest Grove SD and Rochelle Mellendorf, Sodexo Area Marketing Manager.

“The students enjoyed the fair and came away with some useful new knowledge about wellness and healthy habits,” Jasper said.

Washougal

Teaching students.