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The award winning Clark College Orchestra will present its Fall concert as part of the 2019-20 season celebrating the 30th anniversary of Music Director/Conductor Donald Appert on Wednesday, December 4 at Skyview High School in Vancouver, WA. 

This all-orchestral extravaganza will include La Valse by Maurice Ravel, Nuages and Fêtes from Claude Debussy’s Nocturnes and Josef Suk’s Symphony No. 1 in E minor. The performance is at 7:30 pm and admission is free and open to the public. Donations to the Orchestra General Fund will be accepted at the door.

For complete information about all the Clark College Music Department concerts including the orchestra, concert band, jazz ensemble, and choirs, please see http://www.clark.edu/campus-life/arts-events/music/music-concerts.

Donald Appert has appeared as a guest conductor in Japan, Australia, Central America, and throughout Europe.  In Italy La’ovadese wrote, “…the performance of the ‘Serenade in C Major’ of Tchaikovsky, under the exceptional direction of Appert, was in such a style that it brought out the elegance and grace of the melodic lines with Mozartian inspiration.  …The L’Orchestra Sinfonica Città di Grosseto… performed the Barber ‘Adagio’ with rare effectiveness, emphasizing its intrinsically rich melody.”  Giornale di Sicilla praised his interpretation of Nielsen’s First Symphony as “lyrical with an airy freshness,” and his conducting as “precise, painstakingly accurate, and diligent.”  In the United States, he has appeared as a guest conductor of the Vancouver (Washington) Symphony, the University of Texas – Arlington Symphony Orchestra, the Eastern Washington University Symphony Orchestra, and the University of Central Arkansas Symphony.

As one of only five musicians chosen, Dr. Appert received the 2015 Honored Artists of The American Prize, the Honored Artists being “…individuals who have proven themselves to be musicians of “sustained excellence” over a number of seasons as contestants in the competitions.”  Adding to this distinctive honor is his 2011 The American Prize in Orchestral Programming – Vytautas Marijosius Memorial Award for his work with the Oregon Sinfonietta.  

Orchestra
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Dr. Appert was awarded the 2015 ASCAPLUS Award in recognition of his performances in Italy and the United States.  His awards in previous years were for performances in Romania, Qatar, Europe, Central America, Japan, and the United States.  Dr. Appert is the recipient of the 2014 Clark County Arts Commission Lifetime Achievement in the Arts Award, and in 2009, he received the Washington Community College Humanities Association Exemplary Status Award in recognition of his outstanding contributions to the Humanities. 

As a member of ASCAP, most of Dr. Appert’s compositions have been published and his works have been performed throughout the world.  A recent work, Concerto for Cello and Orchestra, commissioned by, and for, Jeffrey Butler of the Houston Symphony, had its world première to great applause on June 17, 2018, with Mr. Butler as soloist and the Clark College Orchestra accompanying him.       

Approximately 600 adults attended a #SAVETHEKIDS parent education event Tuesday night in Vancouver featuring Instagram Influencer/Youth Advocate Collin Kartchner and Educator Katey McPherson.

“This has been a year in the making,” said one of the event’s organizers, Greg Gillespie, who introduced all of the local volunteers. “I’ve been following him on Instagram, and Collin started off making fun of social media influencers, but when Hurricane Harvey hit in Texas he realized he could do things that make a difference. They helped big time in Houston. Has helped out with many causes. Then he really started this crusade about helping kids and parents navigate screens, and now he visits schools and communities all over the country. He even has a TEDX talk.”

Kartchner spent Tuesday at Liberty Middle School and Hood River Elementary, and encouraged guests to evaluate individual phone and screen usage.

“First, none of us had any clue we’d be dealing with this when we had our children,” said Kartchner. “We are the first generation of parents figuring this out, and we have to talk to each other, and I want you to understand this is a no-shame evening.”

He showed a video that of three people from three generations, the first two of which discussed a childhood outdoors, close to nature.

“The current generation is obsessed with video games and using their smart phones and tablets,” he said. “So, what if this trend continues? Nature has always been a part of childhood, and we need to keep it that way. Society has changed and we’ve created new systems and tech and now can tell it’s harming our kids. Our kids are creative geniuses if we let them.”

He shared a story about Whitney, a 20-year-old in Utah who committed suicide because of the pain she suffered using her smart phone.

“So, we created a program called #savethekids and as parents we have to lead the way,” he said. “When we have our phones out in front of our kids it means we appreciate the phone more than we appreciate them.”

Citing examples of new baby and toddler toys that incorporate smart phone technology he said “we have traded all this amazing stuff and have converted it all to a digital screen and we’re realizing it’s been a mistake. Inmates get more outdoor time than our children do.”

And, the older generations are doing it, too.

“Parents: this is not a phone, this is a mini-super computer with access to everything,” said Kartchner. “We are handing them loaded weapons and if we don’t teach them they will destroy themselves. You have to parent your kids, you have know what they’re getting into. If you give them a smartphone you’re giving them a ticket to do anything.”

Video: Sobering Statistics

Then he showed the audience sobering statistics (click video link): https://youtu.be/OzdMG9ovQWs

“Parents, we have to intervene,” he said. “We have created a society for our children that is extremely stressful. We can stop ‘still facing’ our kids and their problems. Babies are very responsive to the world around them. Infants really do engage in personal interaction.”

Video: ”Still Facing”

He used this video to show his point (click video link): https://youtu.be/-Qh5CyLBlkQ

Using images of the pre-frontal cortex slide, Kartchner explained how the brain develops from the rear to the front. 

“The pre-frontal cortex, which is the last part of the brain to develop, affects decision making,” he explained. “Your kid isn’t even close to full development.  Social media and gaming have negative effects on our children’s brains. Games are more addictive than cocaine. Fortnite, a company that makes $1.8 billion a quarter off a ‘free’ game is also an attraction for sexual predators. We are letting our kids turn their backs on their talents.” 

Social Media App Ratings

“Social media app ratings are misleading,” he said. “We’re trying to help the tech companies change how the way apps are rated. For example, lots of porn links are sent through Instagram. Watch out for private DMs. It’s too much for our kids. These phones are destroying our kids. Instagram is a dangerous place for our kids. SnapChat is the worst. They throw out articles to our kids encouraging porn, and 82 percent of porn on Pornhub encourages violence. We have to be careful. TikTok is the next big one and is a place for predators.” 

SnapChat is the worst!”

— Collin Kartchner
Kartchner
Easy to find porn on these apps.

“Mom, I Got Bit”

When you hand your kids a snake they’re gonna get bit, and that’s why he will soon be releasing a book called “Mom, I Got Bit.” He likened the dangers of smartphones to having a snake, and explained how to react when your children get bit:

  1. Don’t yell, don’t get mad.
  2. Tell them “I love you, thank you for being brave enough to tell me you got bit.”
  3. Offer assistance: “What can we do to help you?”
  4. Create a “no trouble” bubble, which is a safe place. 

Hugs and Signs You Might Be a Lawnmower Parent

“Hugs! Our kids need more of this than ever before,” he said. “Hug your kids — kids need 8 hugs a day for 8 seconds each. 20 second hugs have proven to boost the immune system. Why are they so desperate to be seen and loved?”

In this video, he explained what it means to be a “Lawnmower Parent” (click video link): https://youtu.be/8Q_53e283rA

Katey’s Presentation

“Technology is part of our life but it cannot be our central focus,” she said. “When you hand over your device you’re giving them a medium to share their feelings … Prior to age 2 you’ve taken about 2,000 photos. It teaches them that life is to not be lived, it is to be documented.”

“After Columbine (the school shooting) in 1999 we decided nobody would harm our kids. We’ve taken away from our children the ability to cope with their own pain. Our students are walking around with a thin veil of terror and the device is not going to save their lives.”

Citing increasing national anxiety trends, McPherson said that students need to know they have dignity.

“Students need to know they have dignity,” she said. “Think about adding this to your daily vocabulary.

This generation is over the word ‘respect.’ The reason is because we’ve taken away their dignity all day long. We bring them to this Earth with inherent worth, and we need to stop doing the heavy lifting for them. If we want to stop school shootings we better start with the inside out.”

“Spend your energy on being clear on access and sit down with your family to discuss what’s fair. Sit down and be really clear about what the boundaries are. Create a family data contract. They’re not allowed to share private information. Don’t share inappropriate photos. It has to be an ongoing and pervasive message. This is a parent issue, not a school issue. The goal is self-governance by 17 or 18. It is not easy work, but it is possible. If you stop dancing you will lose your child to pornography or gaming or suicide. It’s time to really step into this. We are here to get you in the know about what our kids are exposed to.”

The next #savethekids event happens Wednesday, October 16 from 7-8:30 pm at Mannahouse in Vancouver. 

This is the statement issued this evening by Vancouver Police:

On October 3, 2019, at approximately 2:09 pm, Vancouver Police responded to a call of a shooting at 515 Washington Street (Smith Tower Apartments). When officers arrived, they located three victims in the lobby of the apartment building suffering from gunshot wounds. Two female victims were transported to area hospitals for medical treatment and one male victim was deceased.

Officers determined the suspect, Robert E. Breck, 80, a resident of the building, was inside his apartment, refusing to come out. Verbal communication was established with the suspect by officers from the crisis negotiation team while other officers and SWAT members evacuated residents. At approximately 4:45 p.m. the suspect was taken into custody without incident.

Robert E. Breck was booked into the Clark County Jail on one count of Murder I. and two counts of Attempted Murder I.

All residents have been given the clearance to return to their apartments.

The investigation is continuing and nothing further will be released at this time.

Vancouver, Wash. — In observance of Domestic Violence Awareness month in October, Vancouver Police Department personnel will be wearing purple ribbon lapel pins to show their support of domestic violence victims and raise awareness about domestic, spousal, and teen dating violence.  The department has also outfitted a vehicle with a purple police logo which will be driven to community events and presentations where officers will be providing information on domestic violence, the danger signs of this crime and resources for victims.

Throughout the month, the department will also be posting information, statistics, tips and resources regarding domestic violence on the department website (www.vanpolice.org) and social media (https://twitter.com/VancouverPDUSAhttps://www.facebook.com/VancouverPoliceUSA/)  to further increase awareness around this important issue.

Domestic violence affects millions of men and women of every race, age, religion, culture and status. Domestic violence is not just physical violence; it’s yelling, humiliation, stalking, manipulation, coercion, threats and isolation. Since the Violence Against Women Act was signed into law in 1994, over $7 billion in federal grants have been sent to state and local governments to facilitate programs that prevent domestic violence, sexual assault and dating violence. The Vancouver Police Department has been the recipient of multiple grants related to domestic violence and sexual assault prevention and police response and investigation of these crimes.   

Statistics around domestic violence:

  • On a typical day, more than 20,000 phone calls are placed to domestic violence hotlines
  • 1 in 15 children are exposed to intimate partner violence each year and 90% of those are witnesses
  • 1 in 3 women and 1 in 14 men have been victims of physical violence by an intimate partner
  • 19% of domestic violence involves a weapon
  • 1 in 3 high school students experience either physical or sexual violence, or both by someone they are dating
  • More than half of women (69.5%) and men (53.6%) who have been physically or sexually abused or stalked by a dating partner, first experienced abuse between the ages of 11-24
Domestic Violence
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For additional information and resources, visit the Vancouver Police Department Domestic Violence page at: https://www.cityofvancouver.us/police/page/domestic-violence

If you are afraid your internet and/or computer usage might be monitored, please use a safer computer, or call the local hotline at the YWCA Safe Choice (360)-695-0501, the Washington State Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-562-6025 or the National Domestic Violence Hotline: 1-800-799-SAFE(7233) or TTY 1-800-787-3224.

Vancouver, WA —  On September 21, 2019, Vancouver, Battle Ground and Washougal Police Departments and Clark County Sheriff’s Office will have additional officers enforcing the DUI laws, in an effort to keep drunk, drugged and high drivers off the road. Officers, who are also drug recognition experts, will be among those conducting these increased DUI patrols. In addition, officers from the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis board will also be participating in this emphasis.

Alcohol and drug impaired driving is the leading contributing factor in Washington fatal crashes, with alcohol and cannabis being the most common combination of intoxicants. Getting behind the wheel intoxicated can mean a DUI, if you don’t plan ahead for sober transportation. As a reminder, Uber offers first time users a special coupon code for $25 toward their first trip. Sign up for the Uber coupon code RIDEHOMEVANC at https://get.uber.com/go/ridehomevanc.

Thanks to a grant from the Washington Traffic Safety Commission, law enforcement agencies in SW Washington have extra officers conducting DUI enforcement throughout the year to help keep our roadways safer.

If you are driving and see a suspected impaired driver, call 911.

For more information on the Vancouver Police Department’s commitment to DUI enforcement and DUI prevention tips, visit https://www.cityofvancouver.us/police/page/dui-enforcement

Washougal
wwww.MeuPilates.com

Vancouver, WA — Class is in session at Firstenburg Community Center (700 N.E. 136th Ave.) thanks to a new program designed to serve families who homeschool their children.

Starting in September, Vancouver Parks and Recreation will host engaging, secular classes for homeschool students ages 6-18 during the school year. With over 30 subjects to choose from, classes are offered from 9 am to 3 pm on Mondays and Thursdays, in 6-week sessions.

“We are excited to serve families in this new way,” said Stacey Allington, recreation assistant with Vancouver Parks and Recreation. “Firstenburg Community Center is already a vital resource when it comes to community education and wellness. Providing high-quality homeschool courses is a continuation of our mission to serve the community.”

The elective-style classes are taught by educators, experts and qualified parents. They are designed to supplement home instruction in multiple content areas and provide multi-age peer interaction. Homeschool classes at Firstenburg Community Center will cover a diverse array of subjects including literature, writing, geography, theater, sign language, foreign language, music, design, financial literacy and science. There are also plenty of physical education opportunities like dance, yoga, rock climbing, swimming and team sports.

“The partnership in planning these classes with Vancouver Parks and Recreation has been phenomenal,” explains homeschool parent Erin Robertson, M.Ed. “In addition to the quality content in each class, students have the opportunity to meet new friends, learn from different teaching styles and experience truly unique course offerings.”

Homeschool

Homeschool classes are open to city residents and non-residents, as well as students using other non-traditional educational environments like online learning. Students enrolled in two or more classes per day will have access to a public swim at the Firstenburg Pool on Mondays from 1 to 3 p.m. or Thursdays from 2:30 to 3:45 p.m. at no additional charge. Multi-child and multi-class discounts are also available.

Register online or learn more at www.cityofvancouver.us/FCChomeschool

Firstenburg
Climbing wall.

About Vancouver Parks and Recreation

Vancouver Parks and Recreation builds upon the City’s strong legacy of parks, natural areas and recreation dating back to the dedication of Esther Short Park in 1853. Each month, the Parks and Recreation Department provides hundreds of recreation opportunities for youth, adults, seniors and persons with disabilities at its two community centers. Parks and Recreation operates 1,600 acres of parkland at 113 sites, including 91 parks, 20 miles of trails and many natural areas for the City of Vancouver. The Parks and Recreation Department cultivates community in the City and beyond through on-going special events and volunteer programs that celebrate the City’s natural spaces.

Vancouver, Washington – The highly anticipated Columbia River water feature at Vancouver Waterfront Park (695 Waterfront Way) officially opened to the public today. 

The interactive art installation was gifted to the City of Vancouver by City Council resolution on Monday, Aug. 5. The Vancouver Parks and Recreation Department will maintain the water feature as it draws locals and visitors to enjoy the city’s waterfront for years to come. 

“I believe that carefully conceived environments can create places of meaning within communities,” said Larry Kirkland, the artist who designed the Columbia River water feature. “The best of public art can challenge, delight, educate and illuminate. But above all, it can celebrate the qualities that make each place unique and can create a sense of civic ownership. This pride of place is a building block for the future of these communities.”

Design and Details
The Columbia River water feature journey begins with the monumental structure called Headwaters. This 12-foot tall and 16-foot wide stone and bronze monolith is oriented north and south to the adjacent Columbia River.  

The east face is a cast bronze relief map of the Columbia Basin. The northern Rocky Mountains, Cascades and Coastal mountain ranges and river valleys are rendered in high relief to be touched and traced by human hands. 

The west face is an engraved stone with a topographic map of the origins of the Columbia, the “Great River of the West.” Water cascades down it in a variable flow, reflecting seasonal changes in the flow of the river. The one-inch deep river flows for 150 feet along a molded riverbed past variable-height stacks of textured granite representing each of the Columbia River’s tributaries. More water flows from between these rocks into the original river. The water is chlorinated and can be waded through and played in by visitors.

Facts about each of the tributaries are engraved on the dry side of each granite grouping. Intermingled with the factual text are quotes from literature that reference water and the flow of rivers. Combined, the facts and writingsmerge into a poetic and contemplative experience. 

Donors to the $3.5 million project are recognized on the side of the Headwaters structure.

Donors are Steve and Jan Oliva, who also played a major role in the development of the Vancouver Waterfront, as well as the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust. Other key donors are Steve and Jo Hansen, Al and Sandee Kirkwood, Barry Cain, Alvin Charles Berg, Mary Jane Berg, Susan Lynn Berg, Jim and Shirley Johnson, The Columbian, Dean and Kristin Kirkland Family, Marilyn Denham, and Kenneth E. and Eunice M. Teter.

“We’re really happy to have this water feature built,” said Jan Oliva. “This entire Vancouver Waterfront project has been in the works for 12 years, and there are so many good, wonderful people here in Vancouver. Larry Kirkland is the artist and John Grant (John Grant Projects) is the one who built the fountain. It’s designed to show the inlets of the Columbia flowing into it, and the ocean is represented at the end.

“It’s going to be great for little kids. Since we’re involved in the whole waterfront development this is a key piece that is going to the city from the waterfront development group. We love what’s happening here because we feel it’s helping the whole area. There’s a great walking loop that connects us to the land bridge and the Fort Vancouver Historic Site. It’s a good thing, I’m just happy and pleased with it.”

Columbia River

Design and Details About the Columbia River Water Feature

  • $3.5 million gift to the City of Vancouver, accepted by City Council resolution on August 5, 2019, from Columbia Waterfront, LLC.
  • The water is chlorinated and can be waded through and played in by visitors.
  • The Columbia River water feature journey begins with the monumental structure called Headwaters.
  • This 12-foot tall and 16-foot wide stone and bronze monolith is oriented north and south to the adjacent Columbia River.
  • The east face is a cast bronze bas relief map of the Columbia Basin. The northern Rocky Mountains, Cascades and Coastal mountain ranges and river valleys are rendered in high relief.
  • The west face is an engraved stone with a topographic map of the origins of the Columbia River.
  • Water cascades down it in a variable flow, reflecting seasonal changes in the flow of the river.
  • The one-inch deep river flows for 150 feet along a molded riverbed past variable-height stacks of textured granite representing each of the Columbia River’s tributaries.
  • Facts about each of the tributaries are engraved on the dry side of each granite grouping. Intermingled with the factual text are quotes from literature that reference water and the flow of rivers.
  • Donors to the $3.5 million project are recognized on the side of the Headwaters structure.

McKeanSmith is one of the early tenants at the Vancouver Waterfront. Learn more about them here:https://lacamasmagazine.com/2019/07/mckeansmith-law-firm-expands-into-murdock-vancouver-waterfront-tower.html

Vancouver, WA — The law firm, McKeanSmith LLC, officially moved into their spacious new offices at the stunning Vancouver Waterfront on April 1, and they couldn’t be happier.

“I love the fact that Vancouver is reclaiming its waterfront,” said Collin McKean, the firm’s co-founder. “I find that being next to water is an inspiring place to be. I grew up living on a body of water and it’s a great way to give clients a calming location to do our work and help them through their life transitions.”

The firm, established in 2015, moved their nine employees from their downtown Vancouver office to the fifth floor of the Murdock Tower, which has commanding views of the Columbia River and the I-5 bridge. The nearly 3,800 square foot space gives McKeanSmith room to grow. Their Vancouver office provides legal services in the following areas: family law (including collaborative family law), employment law, business law, general litigation, and criminal law. They also have offices in Portland and Hillsboro.

“As lawyers, we work hard, sometimes long hours for our clients, and it’s important to be in a place you like to be in,” said McKean. “Given we have a front row seat to the waterfront, we’ve taken a unique approach to the gathering space. The location is also comforting to our clients, who are often going through major life changes.”

McKeanSmith
Several McKeanSmith employees at Vancouver’s Waterfront.

The move is also a reflection of the firm’s positive momentum.

“We have a good reputation so we continue to get referrals in from our clients for family law work, and our attorneys are very active in the community,” said McKean. “We value them, and invest in small businesses and support them. We’re looking to increase our employment law practice and support for small businesses. We’re handling typical small business issues with transactional litigation needs.”

And, their work isn’t going unnoticed by their peers.

“We’re proud our lawyers have been recognized in Vancouver for Best Lawyer designations. Annelisa Smith, Deanna Rusch, and I are Super Lawyer Rising Stars,” said McKean. “We’re also ranked top tier in the Portland/Vancouver metro area by US News and World Report, which ranks all firms.”

The office, with its modern touches, brings in a lot of natural light, and a nearly 180 degree view of the waterfront and downtown Vancouver.

“The office offers a calm and serene location and atmosphere because whether they’re new or existing they’re all in some form of turmoil, so you can’t underestimate the importance of that,” said Rusch.
“I have a beautiful view of Mt. Hood, the river and the I-5 Bridge, and kind of just the whole eastern part of the waterfront development that is still under construction. I like watching the boats go by.”

“Family law was the cornerstone of the practice so that was really what they had been doing. Since then, Collin especially has grown into other practice areas. So, when I joined the firm in October 2017 it was to continue my family law practice, which is mostly in Clark County. I represent anyone, mostly in divorces, and my clients range from little to no assets to high assets.”

Art
Art from Attic Gallery in Camas.

And, as part of their commitment to small business and things local, the firm invested heavily in local art to adorn their new office space.

Rusch put partners McKean and Smith in touch with Maria Gonser, owner of Attic Gallery in downtown Camas. Gonser works with local artists, and assisted them with the whole process, even taking a Sunday afternoon to hang the artwork in entrance, hallway, and conference room.

“The art on left-hand side in the conference room are from the Sandra Jones Campbell Pendleton series,” said Gonser. “She had 30 paintings in that series. The pieces on the other side are all from Pendleton. The ‘Broad Shoulders’ cowboy is her father. The ones on the right are inspired from old photographs. She’ll get a series of photographs from a particular era and she recreates those pictures in her paintings.”

McKeanSmith also bought an Earl Hamilton abstract, wood carvings by Monica Setziol-Phillips, and a massive piece by Cedar Lee.

“Collin and Annelisa went through this process with great detail,” said Rusch. “I’m very appreciative of their support and follow through.”

To learn more about their practice, please visit www.McKeanSmithLaw.com

Vancouver, WA — As part of their group meeting at Green Meadows Thursday evening, the Clark County Republican Women (CCRW) presented a check to Pathways Pregnancy Center of Camas and Washougal.

The check, which was presented by CCRW president, Brook Pell, is part of the group’s annual “Impact Award,” which raises funds for local charitable organizations that support women throughout the county.  Funds come from group members, with a matching donation from CCRW.

“CCRW membership is honored to present this monetary contribution to Pathways,” said Pell. “We could not have selected a more deserving organization as the first recipient of our annual CCRW Impact Award. Each year, volunteers and staff at Pathways are saving lives and helping women in need.”

Pathways Pregnancy Clinic provides services to young women who are coping with the fears and anxieties of an unplanned pregnancy. The faith-based organization provides counseling, ultrasounds, and free pregnancy tests.

Pathways is open during regular business hours, and is located at 2926 E Street in Washougal. For more information, call Pathways at 360.834.2829.

The presentation was part of a larger meeting that included a silent auction, dinner, group updates, and a keynote address by expert forensics accountant, Tiffany Couch, who addressed myths about public school funding. She provided information about confusion that surrounds the current McCleary school funding legislation, and its impact on local school districts.

To learn more, visit ClarkCountyRepublicanWomen.org

Clark County, WA — This notice is to solicit nominations for individuals who wish to appear before Clark County Republican PCOs to present themselves as candidates for the position of Clark County Council for District 4. Nominees must reside in County Council District 4 and be of the Republican Party.

Self-nominations should include full contact information and a statement that they are of the Republican Party and live within District 4. Nominations that are not self-nominations should include full contact information of the nominee with the attachment of a signed statement from the nominee that he or she agrees to serve if nominated.

The Clark County Auditor has certified the 2018 elections results and Eileen Quiring has been elected to the position of Clark County Council Chair. Ms. Quiring will take office as Clark County Council Chair on January 1, 2019, and at that time, she will vacate her seat as County Councilor for District 4.

Pursuant to Article II, Section 15 of the Washington State Constitution, the Clark County Republican Central Committee is required to nominate three (3) individuals as candidates. Pursuant to the state constitution, all nominees must: 1) reside in County Council District 4; and (2) be of the same political party as Ms. Quiring, namely the Republican Party. Nominations will be voted upon by Clark County Precinct Committee Officers on January 15. The names of the three individuals nominated will then be forwarded to the Clark County Council. Upon receipt of the names of the three nominees, the Clark County Council will review the nominees, conduct interviews in an open public session, and appoint one of the individuals to the office of Clark County Council District 4.

Any person interested in being considered for nomination by the Clark County Republican Party Central Committee must notify Clark County Republican Party Chairman Earl Bowerman in writing, and must be received no later than January 10, 2019 . Email notifications to earl@earlbowerman.com will be accepted and must be received no later than January 10, 2019. All nominations will be acknowledged within 12 hours with further information on the ensuing process; if acknowledgement is not received, notify Chair Bowerman by email. The mailing address of the Clark County Republican Party is P. O. Box 205, Vancouver, WA 98666.