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Camas, WA — Wrestling is traditionally known as a male sport, but over recent years girls wrestling has been making an upward trend, and Camas and Washougal are no exception. This is the part one in a two-part series that looks at the sport; part one will focus on Camas, and part two, on Washougal.

The Camas High School (CHS) Girls wrestling program had a good showing at the recent Clark County Wrestling tournament, with Eliana Sabatini, a Camas sophomore, winning her weight class (135). Sabatini is a team captain with Autumn Aho, and the team is determined to make a statement.

The Washougal Panthers Wrestling team won the meet outright, with Emma Seekins, a Washougal freshman, winning her weight class (100), pinning her opponent in the second round, which helped Washougal win. The Panthers are also tremendously proud of Abby Lees, a two-time state wrestling champion.

”We’re so pleased with the team,” said Seekins. “I like wrestling because it is a very difficult and challenging sport, and it pushes you to your limits.”

But, back to Camas.

“In the final, I wrestled McMillan from Hudson’s Bay,” said Sabatini. “And, Kiana Pullen won third place at 190. Ava Weatherl, placed fourth at 115 pounds. As a team, Camas took sixth place, and a total of eight Papermakers attended the tournament.”

Winning at such a major meet is quite prestigious, and it’s even more so given Sabatini’s relatively new exposure to the sport. She has just been wrestling for a year.

Girls Wrestling

Washougal won the Clark County Wrestling Tournament.

Girls Wrestling

The Camas Girls Wrestling team at the Clark County Wrestling Tournament.

Why wrestling?

“A coach at Skyridge got her interested,” Sabatini said. “And, I love being the only girl in my grade to wrestle. All the wrestling boys tell me that girls shouldn’t wrestle, but that got me motivated. I have an uncle who has wrestled and he taught me new moves. I feel like boys are always talked about, and the girls aren’t really acknowledge a lot, so it’s time to get the word out. Nobody knows about it.”

Arktana

www.Arktana.com

Sabatini said she wrestles boys in practice, which helps her.

“It’s not weird, it’s just an opponent, and boys wrestling is different than girls,” she said. “The types of moves they use.”

What does wrestling teach the youth?

“It teaches me a lot, it teaches me how to work hard, and gives me confidence, and it makes me want to help teach others to help grow the girls wrestling team,” said Sabatini. “I think girls are afraid to wrestle because it’s so new. They’re afraid of the toughness.”

Mark Yamashida is the girls wrestling head coach, and he works hard to teach his team the skills required to win — and learn.

He also is working to get the word out about the sport, and spends time at each match teaching the girls, and making sure they feel positive.

“He gives me self-confidence before a match, and helps the girls out with everything,” said Sabatini. “With school, with wrestling and it helps me push myself and reach my goals. I love the sport so much. I love the competition and I love to win. Getting my hand raised after a match is the best feeling I’ve ever felt in life. My coach always tells me I’m always smiling through everything even when I’m in so much pain trying to make a move or push myself in practice. I’m always smiling and having a good time.”

Their next tournament is next Friday, which is the RA Long Invite.

 

 

 

Sacramento, CA — The Camas Science Olympiad team sent 100 students, chaperones, and coaches to Mira Loma High School this past weekend to compete at an annual regional Science Olympiad competition.

The two Camas High School (CHS) teams (Red and Black) brought with them three middle school teams: Skyridge, Liberty, and Odyssey, earning a record number of medals along the way.

“This time we flew instead of taking the train, which was very nice,” said CHS Senior, Abigail Jiang. “The tournament featured 30 high school teams, as well as 30 middle school teams, and we earned a record number of medals this year! I’m so proud of our Camas teams!”

The CHS Black Team placed 8th overall, while Red Team placed 17th. Skyridge placed 10th, Liberty placed 19th, and Odyssey placed 27th (pretty decent for their 2nd tournament ever as a new team).

In the general competition, CHS Black earned first in Geologic Mapping, fifth in Fermi Questions (CHS Black), fourth and fifth in Sounds of Music (CHS Black and Red), first in Forensics (CHS Red), third in Circuit Lab (CHS Black). Skyridge won fifth in Game On.

CHS Black also won first in Astronomy, while CHS Red placed 3rd in Mission Possible. Skyridge placed first in Mystery Architecture, while, Liberty placed fourth in Potions and Poisons, and third in Write It Do It.

Teams spent weeks and months working on their specific projects and trying to work together. It requires a lot of planning, studying, reading, and strategizing.

The Camas Science Olympiad team continues to grow and prosper, and they use these competitions to prepare themselves for State.

”We have such good coaches, and advisors,” said Jiang. “And, we’ve had great support from our parents. Everyone works really hard.”

 

Camas, WA — Ali Alquraisha, the owner of Camas Produce, said his store plans to be open in about one week after a large portion of his business was demolished following Thurday’s night SUV accident.

Camas Police said that Terra Stark, 39, of Camas, accidentally put the car in drive while parked at Camas Produce, and plowed through the front center of the building. Her teen son was in the vehicle with her.

”It went all the way into the store,” he said. “Fortunately, nobody inside was hurt.”

Several people, including the tow truck team, spent time Thursday cleaning up debris and boarding up the store. Alquraisha said they need time to rebuild, which will require a city inspection before they can re-open.

”There are so many great people in this community, and they ask how they can help us,” he said. “You can help us by coming back next week and shopping here. We are so grateful for you.”

He said right now they’re going through the process of contacting Stark’s insurance company, and figuring out where to go from here. She was driving a corporate fleet vehicle.

Stark is an active member of the community, and is always willing to lend a helping hand. Her two sons are active in local sports.

Her husband, Ben, reported this morning that “she’s fine” but wouln’t elaborate any further.

“She was issued a traffic infraction, and is still under investigation for DUI,” said Debrah Riedel, Camas Police Public Information Officer. “There will be no arrests or further charges until we get blood results, but she was obviously impaired. And, she wasn’t cooperative with any statements. When we have probable cause for DUI we do handcuff a person, but it may take a few days or even weeks pending blood test results before we know anything conclusive.”

Several witnesses say that prior to the accident, Stark was in attendance at a middle school basketball parent meeting where she was “red-faced, had slightly slurred speech,” and “kept dropping papers.”

 

 

Camas, WA — In their ongoing effort to support local artists, Tyson and Lori Morris, owners of Artful Attic in Downtown Camas, are sponsoring a fun youth art contest.

The art contest will run now until February 5 when all submissions need to be delivered to Artful Attic, which is located at 217 NE 3rd Avenue, Camas, WA 98607.

Rules:

  • The art contest is open to all Camas youth ages 11-18.
  • Artwork needs to fit on 10×10 wood canvases, which will be donated by Artful Attic.
  • Each canvas may be picked up at the shop.
  • Any medium is acceptable (wood burning, painting, metal, etc.) as long as it fits on the canvas.
  • Theme is “what Camas means to you.”
  • All works should include #MyCamas.
  • All submissions must be returned to Artful Attic by Feb 5th.
  • Each winner will receive a $25 gift card to Artful Attic.

There will be six winners in total, and their names will be announced during the Feb 7th reception at 6 pm, which will be held at the boutique. Winners will have their art featured in the Artful Attic gallery during the month of February.

Artists may choose to sell their piece at Artful Attic for 30 percent commission fee.

To learn more, call 360.210.4927 or email: info@artfulatticboutique.com

Shopper’s

Custom engravings are available at Artful Attic.

Camas, WA — The Steel Hearts 4H Robotics team is hard work these days getting their robot ready for the upcoming State competition in Kent, WA on February 10.

The team, which operates under the FIRST Robotics program, is sponsored by a local 4H club, and is in their third year of operation. FIRST stands for For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology, and the program has four levels of competition:

1) Elementary LEGO League Junior
2) FIRST LEGO League
3) FTC, First Tech Challenge (where Steel Hearts competes)
4) FRC, First Robotics Competition (at CHS and other schools) aka Mean Machine

“This is our third year as a team, which started at Liberty, and they had an advisor who was a teacher at Hayes Freedom,” said the team’s assistant coach, David VanCleave. “We had to find our own way and we joined 4H to have their insurance and program coverage. We organized as a 4H Club, but we follow FIRST rules for competition. As we accumulated parts and tools, we started meeting with Melanie Nelson at her garage. We wouldn’t exist as a team if it weren’t for the Mean Machine FRC Club at the high school. They secured a CEF grant to buy robot kits.”

The team faces some daunting competition fees, which are $1200 every year — simply to compete — so they do fund raise. FIRST Washington has given them grants, as well.

“Every year there’s a new theme, and this year is Rover Ruckus, which is essentially you are landing on the surface of Mars, and your robot is attached to the lander and you have to sample different minerals. You have to identify the minerals and you get points for that. Try to see who can do it better. The first 30 seconds are autonomous, then there’s a user controlled period, which is about 2.5 minutes. The last 30 seconds is when you have to re-dock back onto the lander.”

Robotics

Hard at work.

Nelson and VanCleave both said that knowing how to program is essential to the success of the project.

”This is our third year, and this is the first time we’ve been invited to State,” said VanCleave. “We then go to a big inter-league.”

Nelson runs the team as a whole, focusing on sportsmanship, community outreach, professionalism, and “coopertition” which is cooperative competition. The team does have three high schoolers but most are middle schoolers who compete with full-blown high school teams.

As head coach, Nelson is the organizational person, while VanCleave teaches the technical aspects. Steel Hearts meets two to three times a week during competition season which goes from September through December.

There are nine kids on the team.

“We won the Motivate award, which is about motivating others in the community about science technology,” said VanCleave. “The award is helping others to embrace the culture of FIRST, and shows what it means to be a team. It’s about building team spirit and enthusiasm. We also strongly suggested that all team members work to market their team.”

In the offseason, Steel Hearts has a presence at the Clark County Fair with the 4H team. Last year, the team conducted tours of recycling plants in Portland, and the Underwriters Laboratory Labs in Camas. The team volunteered at the Clark County Food Bank.

There are other teams in the area that made State, such as Union High School, who won the best overall team award. They have a 15 kids. Mountain View also has a really good team.

“Our program expects a lot of experimentation, and the kids decide on their own how to do things,” said VanCleave. “We coach them on concepts, and there’s a lot of trial and error. We start off strong running in September to come up with designs.”

They are also very grateful to the Camas High School Mean Machine for their ongoing support.

Camas, WA —  State Senator Ann Rivers, Representative Brandon Vick, and Rep-Elect Larry Hoff met with 18th LD constituents Saturday at four separate town hall meetings to answer voter questions ahead of the next legislative session in Olympia.

The 90-minute session started off with introductions to provide voters a sense of the work they will be working on this year. Rivers, a Republican, said she will work as Minority Whip.

Vick, also a Republican, who is entering his fourth term, says “it’ll be an interesting year with 43 Republicans and 57 Democrats, which means I’ll have to figure out how to do my job differently, but it doesn’t mean you can’t be effective.”

He said he’ll be serving on the Finance and Tax Policy committee, and thinks gambling may turn into a major issue this year.

Republican Hoff, 67, who was elected to public office for the first time in November, said he will serve on the Appropriations Committee, which oversees how money is spent.

”We need to be better stewards of that charge,” said Hoff. “I have a passion for small business, and I want to reduce regulations to help small businesses operate more efficiently. I really look forward to starting to work. My calendar has been jammed with 15 minute appointments in Olympia. It’s fun to listen to people in those meetings.”

Mental Health

The session got started with Rivers answering a question about mental health, drug addiction, and rising suicides among the elderly.

“I’m not generally a fan of the governor’s policies, but I am working closely on mental health legislation with Governor Inslee, and I look forward to that. Mental health isn’t sexy, it’s not fun, but it’s really important. Mental health will be the focus of this legislative session, and to fund mental health issues in the schools, and in particular, special education.”

Rivers continued: “It’s about creating housing for those folks who aren’t capable of managing. Our jails are full, and you see they’re housing mentally ill citizens. It’s a very comprehensive plan to provide housing and counseling. If you are very poor in this state you can get services. The rich can, too, but the middle class really can’t. I’m excited what the Governor is putting forward. You will see a ton of activity around mental health.”

Vick said every session has a theme, and this will be about mental health.

 

 

 

 

McCleary Legislation Causes Public School Funding Deficits

Camas resident Aunna Elm had a 12-minute exchange addressing school district funding issues that have stemmed from McCleary.

”I’m a parent and I know you want to put McCleary to rest, but it can’t rest,” said Elm. “I started attending school board meetings this past Fall when I became aware of what the funding issues were during the statewide strikes. I’ve been watching my school board and my administration grapple with the realities of what’s about to hit us, effective immediately. We are using reserves to cover what was lost when this legislation was passed.”

Elm asked the legislators about loss of regionalization funding, the staff funding model, and budget deficits, and what is going to be done to resolve these issues. She also challenged them on why the 18th LD representatives didn’t attend a recent ESD112 education meeting.

”I’m imploring you to do a re-do,” said Elm. “Please come meet with superintendents and come to the table to help us prevent this crisis. McCleary is not a good law. I’m upset it was passed.”

Rivers said the law was designed to create equity over time, but what happened at the end of the session is that it took out the steady ramp-up in funding.

”All of the structure and guidelines that we put in were removed,” said Rivers. “So when that happened it became a big pot of money and all contracts were opened up. That’s where the strikes came from. I hope not to offend any of you, but this big pot of money was like dragging a doughnut through a fat farm. People dove in and they wanted it, and then you had the union reporting a 25 percent increase in pay, which was not truthful. Then other teachers saw that, and they wanted it. It was all based on mis-information. There was never a 25 percent increase, but that became the standard, so all of the structure that would have involved a steady ramp up was removed.”

Rivers said she meets with superintendents on a regular basis.

“The good news is there will be a renewed push for special ed because clearly we have to do that. That’s just morally and legally appropriate,” said Rivers. “I think we are headed toward another McCleary if what the Governor is proposing is adopted by the Legislature, then we will return to the have’s and have-nots for education.”

Town Hall

A Camas resident discusses affordable housing issues in SW Washington.

Property Taxes

Property taxes were also addressed as a result of the McCleary legislation. Rivers said she has “heard from many constituents who can’t afford to live in their homes because of increased property taxes, and I want you to know there will be a 30 percent cut in property taxes coming this year.”

Vick replied: “You have allies on this, as well. We need to do something that’s fair for everybody. We don’t want to see people losing their houses.”

Growth Management Act

Erin Alley, president of a local homeowners association said she has watched the Growth Management Act fail, and discussed the challenges of the Mount Livingston quarry. She asked about what action can be taken legislatively to prevent quarries from being developed. She said it’s a failure of land use planning.

Rivers replied: “GMA is not working, and it’s been a common thread during all our town halls today.”

Carbon Emissions Tax

“Washington is the 4th lowest state in carbon emissions,” said Rivers.  “The last thing we can do is hit the tailpipe, and I’m not in favor of that. We need to incentivize instead of punishing citizens.”

Hoff said he was against the carbon emissions tax because it would have “increased the cost of food and that would have hurt everybody, especially poor people.”

Town Hall

Citizens came to ask questions at Camas City Hall.

Infrastructure and Housing Density

Camas resident Bill Hewitt addressed the I-5 bridge, and housing density.

“Democrats want to increase housing density and it really doesn’t work,” said Hewitt. “When you consider affordable housing please consider the quality of life aspects. We need to encourage an infrastructure to go underground.”

That comment led to a lively debate about light rail, replacing the I-5 bridge, and improving overall infrastructure. Several complained that the U.S. infrastructure has been crumbling, and that not enough is being done to fix it.

Ann Rivers said light rail is old thinking and instead said we should focus on new technologies, like underground tunnels, driverless BRTs, and last mile connectors.

“For the record Clark County has voted light rail down every time it comes to a vote, expect for the little spot in the 49th District in Downtown Vancouver,” said Connie Jo Freeman.

That argument was countered by resident Doug Long.

“I’ve had the privilege of traveling around the world using light rail systems,” said Long.  “Many of our larger cities wouldn’t function without light rail. Light rail is the future. The buses are fine for arterials, but they’re not the best solution.”

Rivers countered.

“The problem with rail is that it’s fixed,” said Rivers. “You need massive density in order to get enough riders to pay for itself. Tri-Met doesn’t pay for itself. People in favor of light rail are also against building tall buildings to house people who would use light rail. It doesn’t make fiscal sense. We just don’t have the population density.”

Hoff said he’s optimistic something can be done to remedy these issues.

“We’ve been talking about solutions for a long time, now we need to act,” said Hoff.

Hoff encouraged citizens to be active and to let their voices be heard.

Town Hall

From left: Representative-elect Larry Hoff, Senator Ann River, and Representative Brandon Vick.

Camas, WA —  Brook Pell, a Republican living in Camas, announced her candidacy today for Clark County Council District 4.

Brook is the Chief Operating Officer for a family owned construction company which builds residential and commercial steel buildings. Prior business experience includes CRE property manager of a diversified capital management firm where she managed a portfolio that consisted of a 340,000 rsf commercial office campus, several retail centers and residential/multi-family properties.

Pell is a Clark County native having grown up in Washougal, and is married to Sascha Pell. They have five children; four in the Camas School District and their oldest is a freshman at Clark College.

Pell’s priorities are policies that attract job creators to Clark County, transportation solutions that are supported by the taxpayers, lean and efficient government, policies that respect the rights of urban and rural land owners, good roads, adequate funding for law enforcement and infrastructure to support growth.

“Clark County is growing and along with that comes the challenge of providing the services that citizens need and want. As a small business owner, I know from experience how decisions made by government can negatively impact the economy or encourage prosperity. When I hear that people are forced to sell their homes due to higher property tax, I know we need a better solution. Focusing on what matters most to the people in Clark County is my pledge to the voters.” said Pell.

To learn more, visit her website at www.electbrookpell.com

The website isn’t yet up and running.

Camas, WA — Many of you love the game CLUE and now is your chance to play the First Friday version! Join in the “Case of the Missing Cupcakes” today from 5-8 pm. Dress in CLUE inspired game suspects attire and get extra tickets to win!

First Friday Activities:

  • Find fun clues in participating merchants to solve the “Case of the Missing Cupcakes” and earn tickets to win prizes!
  • Get a FREE mini-cupcake sponsored by Cake Happy when you solve the mystery!
  • Art Receptions & Shows at Camas Gallery and Attic Gallery!
  • Enjoy the movie “Clue” at the Liberty Theatre – Friday 1/4/18, show time will be 8pm … don’t forget the popcorn!
  • Fun Kid’s winter crafts and Lego table
  • Get 5 free tickets to win if you dress like one of the characters in the Parker Brothers “CLUE” game!
  • Earn extra tickets to win with every $10 spent in downtown!
TWO Ribbon cuttings! Come welcome Lori and Tyson from The Artful Attic as we celebrate the ribbon cutting for their new shop at 5 pm. Salon Magnolia will also have a ribbon cutting to celebrate their spa addition – their ribbon cutting will be at 5:30 pm.

New menu launch with tequila pairings at Mesa!

Friday

New menu at Nuestra Mesa launches today.

ALSO: You can also pick up your panels (if still available! Come early at 5pm–we only have a few sets left!)) for the “Little Art Camas” event at the DCA table in Journey Church (please bring your completed form).

Start your night at the DCA tables at Journey at 4th and Birch.

 

 

Camas, WA — For a 24-hour period (Wednesday-Thursday) nine members of Small Business Revolution’s “Main Street” web TV series team quickly became acquainted with Camas leaders, business owners, and residents in their first of ten small town stops across the country.

The objective of their visit was to learn about Mill Town’s history, its accomplishments, and struggles with the purpose of choosing a town to be featured in season four of their hit web TV show. Camas was nominated by Attic Gallery owner, Maria Gonser, who thought Camas would be a good fit.

Mill Town was ultimately chosen as a Top 20 city out of 12,000 nominations, and on December 11, show co-host, Amanda Brinkman, announced that Camas was a Top 10 pick.

Brinkman and fellow team members, who work for Deluxe, which is based in Minnesota, arrived in Camas Wednesday just before noon, and at 12:30 they gathered at the Georgia-Pacific Mill Interpretive Center to learn about local history, and discuss local successes, as well as current struggles.

The team included Brinkman; Cameron Potts, VP of Public Relations; Julie Gordon, Director of Marketing Partnerships; Katie Cerney, Director of Social Media Strategy — Small Business Division; Jessica Jones, Social Media Manager; cameramen Mike Thompson, and Dan; Jenna Paulus, Public Relations Manager; and Jake Anderson, who works for Fast Horse Public Relations firm.

Following their initial meeting, the “Main Street” team executed a strategy and schedule that was designed to maximize their time, which comprised previously scheduled long video interviews, spontaneous short video interviews, and free form visits to local businesses.

Camas

Dawn Stanchfield, owner of Lily Atelier, shows her store to Julie Gordon, who is the Director of Marketing Partnerships at Deluxe.

Early stops included visits to Urban Style, Lily Atelier, Camas Antiques, Caps ‘N Taps, Flow Hot Yoga, Arktana, The Wild Hair, Mill City Brew Werks, Nest and Love Photography, Natalia’s Cafe, Nuestra Mesa, and several others. They greeted people on the street, spent time getting to understand businesses, and filmed a large portion of their efforts. They made a point to visit as many shops, restaurants, and boutiques as time allowed, and were greeted warmly by a large crowd at Grains of Wrath at 6 pm.

During that visit, Brinkman explained the purpose of their visit, which is to explore each Top 10 town, with the goal of announcing Top 5 contenders in mid-February.

“She’s a marketing expert that helps you think out of the box,” said Carrie Schulstad, Executive Director of the Downtown Camas Association (DCA) as she introduced Brinkman. “She’s inclusive, she’s creative, she gets it. She cares about your success, and we feel so honored that you’re here in our town.”

The excited crowd listened to a brief message from Brinkman, and then spent the next two hours greeting the team members and getting to know how they work.

”First of all, we thank you so much for this reception,” said Brinkman. “This is incredible! We also want to thank you guys for going first … I like to think of it that you are already raising the bar!”

She recognized her “Main Street” team members and then explained how the process works.

”I am just one part of this incredible team from Deluxe who runs Small Business Revolution,” said Brinkman. “I’m only one part of the decision-making process so you have to woo and impress these guys just as much.”

During the reception at Grains, Gordon spent nearly 30 minutes with the Camas High School DECA team listening to their ideas and answering marketing questions. Brinkman also pulled them aside to discuss business.

”They’re such a talented group of kids,” said Gordon. “They had some great ideas.”

The “Main Street” team was back at it Thursday morning meeting with DCA and Camas city leaders, and then spent their remaining two hours conducting final interviews, and visiting as many shops as they could. Gordon spent time on 3rd Avenue with Salud Wine Co, A Beer at a Time, Artful Attic, Los Jalepenos, and Camas Gallery. Potts visited Elida Art Studio. Jones interviewed The Wild Hair, and Brinkman interviewed Natalia’s Cafe, and paid a visit to Camas Gallery. Many other visits surely happened.

”We make a point to visit as many businesses as we can,” said Brinkman. “We want to learn as much as possible, to hear about their struggles and see where they need help.”

Cerney said she’s looking forward to returning in April for a guaranteed marketing seminar for local businesses.

”I love this town,” she said. “It’s like being in a Hallmark Channel movie. I can’t wait to come back.”

To learn more, visit www.smallbusinessrevolution.org

Camas, WA — “Mission accomplished,” said Ed Fischer, owner of Camas Bike and Sport in Downtown Camas. “We wrapped up with the local adopt-a-family here in Washougal, and what a nice family! And with the RV camper, the trip went smoothly and after the Chico DMV visit, we got the trailer up there right before nightfall and it was placed on the house pad where the lost home once sat. We did not get much of any time to take a look around, but the devastation was real and evident, and the recent flooding there really left the roads in shambles.”

When Fischer first heard about the Paradise, CA fires he became a big advocate in helping out, so he spent considerable time and money trying to locate a family that needed help, and would purchase an RV camper. But, even though his heart was in the right place, it ended up being a major challenge.

”I learned that it’s not easy to do all that stuff,” said Fischer. “It was very hard to organize, it took a lot of coordinating, planning, and communicating. There’s a lot more than the monetary portion. Procuring the trailer was very challenging. There were a lot of scams and misleading people out there, but ultimately we found a good trailer that would really help out this family.”

Fischer said about two-thirds of the cost of the RV was received through local donations following its purchase. He said many donations were $10, and one man gave $300.

Humane

www.McKeanSmithLaw.com

”Every amount helped,” said Fischer. “And, it was great to see all the support. All of it made this possible.”

Community members are contributed home essentials to fill the trailer, which was delivered several days ago.

Jeff Paul accompanied Fischer to California to deliver the trailer, and the two witnessed the fire’s devastation.

“It was amazing to see the random destruction, the fires took a few homes, then you’d see a couple that didn’t even look touched, then back to piles of debris where houses once stood.” said Fischer. “It really gave me a flashback to the fire’s I worked in back in Malibu in 1993, same thing happened where floods would come in soon after and reek further havoc on the area. In the end, the camper is now helping the family live on the property and rebuild, and it felt like we did the right thing for the right people! And last, could not have done it without all the support and contributions from so many that rallied around the cause. I didn’t get a lot of pictures because I want to respect people’s privacy. It wasn’t a staging photo moment. We got there kind of late, and the whole family wasn’t there.”

He also appreciates the local support of their adopt a family, who lives in Washougal.