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Camas, WA — It’s hard to believe, but Grains of Wrath turns one this week, and they’re celebrating Saturday with a new release of a Triple IPA called “Spoils of War.” The celebration lasts from 3-10 pm on Saturday with some fun event food, and the launch of their new Mug Club.

“We’re also releasing our first wild beer, which is a sour beer, using a wild yeast,” said co-owner Mike Hunsaker. It’s a barrel-aged Belgian style quad, aged in a Pinot Noir barrel with Cape Blanco cranberries. We also have an Imperial Stout aged in rum barrels, and we’re releasing a new shirt.”

In the 12 months since their launch, Grains has released 50 beers, won some distinguished awards, and is increasing their own brand distribution.

Greenen said IPA’s are most popular, and laugers are making a big comeback.

“Like any small business, it can be tough,” said co-owner Brendan Greenen. “Our crew has learned a lot about our customers, and we’ve learned how to react faster to change. I’d say our biggest surprise has been figuring out to increase exposure and traffic on weekdays, but we’re still new and Camas is still learning about us.”

They take pride in their brewpub, and the product made right in Mill Town.

Grains
Grains of Wrath

“Our greatest successes are the quality of the beer, winning several awards,” said Hunsaker. “The very first beer in the system took a gold medal at the Great American Beer Festival — out of four entries we won a medal, and we were super proud about that.”

Customers also rave about the food, especially the GOW burger, which is house-ground with brisket in a half-pound patty. It’s popular along with the Fried Chicken sandwich.

“It’s been great,” said Greenen. “We’ve been proud of the offerings and the service. There are always missteps with food or service issues, but they’ve been pretty minimal. We have a good team with 32 people right now, and it grows in the summer. Erin LeDoux and Joel Schmidt are the chefs.”

“Looking ahead — I think our goal for year two is to continue to grow our regular customer base and market Grains of Wrath to be a gathering place. We’re also increasing our distribution spread by self-distributing to other bars and pubs. It’s mostly about increasing the exposure. It’s about controlling the amount of beer so that we don’t lose control of the quality. Don’t want to lose sight of what we’re here for.”

They’ll also be encouraging more events, for example, 100 Women Who Care Clark County holds their quarterly meeting, and they hosted the Small Business Revolution reception in January.

“Camas has been really good to us,” said Hunsaker. “We’re consistent. This downtown is such a wonderful downtown. Keep people here. Keep coming.”

To learn more, visit gowbeer.com

The lingering effects of the McCleary legislation and subsequent “fix” are leaving school districts across the state with massive budget deficits, and Camas is no exception.

Camas School District leaders have been very public for the past year that the new state funding model would have draconian budget effects, and CSD Superintendent Jeff Snell reports the district is officially grappling with an $8 million shortfall in the upcoming 2019-20 school year.

“An $8 million deficit is the reality,” said Snell. “Layoffs are coming. There has to be a reduction in force, there’s no way around it. We will send notices out on May 15 for certificated staff, and June 1 for classified staff. Sometimes you have to over-inform people that they may not have a job.”

Snell wishes this wasn’t the case, and regrets having to layoff valuable employees.

“This is just the model that we’re in because of the timing of the Legislature,” said Snell.

To deal with the upcoming shortfall, CSD is taking several actions now, which include tightening the belt, and organizing a community-based budget committee.

Tightening the belt measures:
• Reduced non-staff budgets (supplies) by 3%.
• One-year contracts for any new district employee hires.
• Cabinet raises start mid-year.

Critics say more needs to be done before laying off teachers and staff. The budget committee meets regularly to work out considerations which will be presented to Snell at the end of April. Snell will then review those considerations, and make recommendations to the School Board.

Camas School
Camas Superintendent, Jeff Snell, discusses legislative updates.

“They’ve been working hard and report to the School Board about progress,” said Snell.

“These seem like logical steps to take when facing tough budget decisions and are areas that do not impact student learning,” said Shelley Houle, president of the Camas Education Association (CEA).

CEA will be working closely with CSD during the layoff process.

“CEA works closely with management and follows a process that is set in our current bargaining agreement,” said Houle. “Ultimately CSD makes the final decisions, but CEA makes sure the process is followed.”

So, what is that process?

“There is a seniority factor found on page 39 of our contract,” said Houle. “The first step, though, is for the board to adopt a reduced educational program. Then there are steps to make sure that remaining positions will be filled by educators with the proper certifications, endorsements, and/or licenses. This section is quite detailed, but must be decided before looking at seniority. Then at the top is seniority in Washington State, followed by Camas School District, and then years in the profession. Following that is credits earned beyond BA or MA, flexibility of certification, and then lottery.”

During bargaining sessions last summer, lead CEA negotiator Mark Gardner dismissed talks of layoffs, claiming they were district scare tactics aimed at denying teachers the full promise of McCleary.

So, should CEA have settled for the 4 percent raises offered early in the negotiations? Is CSD misinterpreting the law?

“2019-20 was projected to be a dip year when levy changes were being felt the most and districts are planning on how to manage that,” said Houle. “McCleary significantly increased public education funding including money for compensation. The state was not doing its paramount duty. Legislation passed that greatly changed the structure of funding. I wouldn’t call it a misinterpretation. Districts must now restructure and reprioritize based on the new model.”

Camas School
CEA at their general membership meeting in August 2018.

If the new model ends up laying off teachers all over the state how is that helping things?

“I can’t make a hindsight decision on our negotiations,” said Houle. “We bargained on the current conditions for the increased funding that McCleary provided. The state had failed in its paramount duty which included compensation. With a new model comes a shift in how money is spent. We have a teacher shortage in our state and country. With increased compensation comes better recruitment and retainment. But first, budget decisions have to be made. We hate to see any reductions in staff because we value our colleagues and the important work they do every day for students.”

So, knowing the new model would result in layoffs, of which they were very transparent, why did CSD agree to last year’s CEA settlement?

“There were very strong political forces at play, financials in a new model, and we were still trying to understand the impact of the new model,” said Snell. “There was a massive infusion of cash and as those come out you try to come up with solutions that are going to work. And, we felt it was our job to get classes started on time. Teachers needed to be teaching.”

“These are the realities. When you look across the landscape, our raises were consistent with other districts. You have to have a workforce that’s competitive and is compensated fairly. We feel like we have a great staff, but we also have this big conundrum we’re trying to work through. Trying to be very thoughtful about the entire problem. We’re doing the best we can with what we’ve been given. Because the models change, either the Legislature has to do things differently, or we have to make major cuts.”

Camas School
Camas School Board at a recent meeting.

He said the process doesn’t just happen with one decision point.

“It’s an incredibly complex new funding model, and it took several months to really understand it,” said Snell. “I care about our schools and staff and I want the best for everyone there. I try to be as transparent as possible, and that’s why we started the budget committee. You walk this fine line of is that it’s so complex it’s really hard to explain.”

Senator Ann Rivers said the problem with the legislation is that it put all the money out in one lump sum.

“When we agreed to the bill it was meant to release the funds over time, in a more gradual way, but they changed it at the last minute, and all these billions went out at once,” said Rivers. “It was like dragging a doughnut through a fat farm! Everyone wanted a part of it, and suddenly the Washington Education Association (WEA) started talking about 25 percent raises — and it wasn’t true.”

Rivers said once the unions put that out about 25 percent raises, it galvanized their membership, and pushed them to issue strike threats.

“The WEA misled their teachers, the public, and some school districts felt like they were extorted — forced to give teachers raises they knew they couldn’t afford.”

Did Snell feel like he was extorted?

He said no.

“I have a role to try to find balance and see our workforce costs and compare them to what we need to offer,” he said.

And, Snell also discussed the complexities of budgets in this new funding model.

“Budgets in public schools are very challenging because you don’t know what the revenue is from the Legislature,” said Snell. “We can see right now there are all kinds of bills out there that can change things. There are changes but it’s within a similar structure. The challenge has led to confusion and different interpretations and you see negotiations that are really challenging. You have a Legislature that is still wrestling with this.”

Did the McCleary legislation unintentionally create more harm than good?

Eric Engebretson, president of the Washington Association of Educators (WAE) said the Washington Education Association (WEA) played a key role in pushing the Supreme Court decision and in lobbying for the legislation that is causing today’s havoc.

“The legislation had good intent, but it also has a mixed message,” said Engebretson. “It’s not as clear as we would have liked to have seen. It’s tied the districts hands in some ways, it’s tied the union’s hands in some ways … some think it’s pass-through money and others say they can do what they want so we hope that everything gets revisited soon …”

Snell said the teacher’s unions are about taking care of the teachers.

“If you have a union that’s responsible for wages for your group, then you need to change the model for more capacity,” said Snell. “The WEA forced the system to change the model. They created a crisis in the system that then prompts increased funding, that’s what the McCleary decision did, and so it disrupted this system and created a new system. I don’t know if WEA is worried about the system. They care about their teachers. The WEA is in charge right now. I understand there are forces at play with different interests.”

Snell calls it a conundrum.

“Raises caused this problem, but raises also retain amazing staff members,” said Snell. “Here we are. There’s a deficit. We’re trying to make good decisions. Good decisions are always challenging.”

Houle said, “The WEA’s mission is to strengthen public schools. And yes, the legislators need to continue fixing the law and decrease the havoc!”

Camas School
Camas High School 2018 Graduation ceremony.

Can this be resolved before layoffs happen?

Eighty-six percent of the CSD budget is personnel, and with the need to cut $8 million during the next school year, it’s likely dozens of teachers and staff will be laid off — if nothing changes.

“The legislature is listening. They talk about levy, about special education funding, and increasing that to help balance things,” said Snell. “The Governor’s budget has relief for us, but that’s just one component. What are the changes to the model for the 2019 year? We don’t know.”

Houle is spending today in Olympia.

“I am meeting with other WEA political action committee board members for a legislative update and for more training,” said Houle. “I was up there on Presidents’ Day lobbying and will be doing so again later this month. All in all, we want schools to remain a safe place for our students to learn. CEA will continue to lobby for increased special education funding, levy flexibility, and increased funding for safety (counselors, nurses, etc).”

With layoffs looming, was it right for the School Board to give Snell a 5 percent raise?

The school board approached Snell with a 5 percent raise offer, from December on.

“In my mind, it’s 3.1 percent because it started mid-year,” said Snell. “I have a $163,000 base salary. It’s an important job.”

What’s next?

Snell said the district leadership will be working closely with union leadership and talking to them about the process, and trying to be as transparent as possible knowing that it impacts the CSD fund balance. He said it’s essential to start to change the model, and that expenditures need to line up with income.

“What happens next is the committee develops considerations for me, and I will develop a budget and present it the school board,” said Snell. “This will happen at the end of April with the Legislature and we’ll then do our best guess to speculate what the Legislature will do, and then we’ll formally adopt it in August. Before all that, we have contractural obligations and we have notification dates for employees.”

“Non-personnel cuts includes supplies, travel, utilities, gas, buses, contracted services through special education,” said Snell. “There’s a lot there. We would probably look at a percent applied to those things. We need to realize savings to those costs. Look at extracurricular expenses, which are paid through levy and student fees. Do we hold those? In the short term, I don’t want to make decisions that remove programs. Our desire is to maintain programming. In year two or three if you see the revenue is not coming then you might have to reduce programming. Regarding buses, we try to keep on depreciation cycle because we get funds from the state.”

Today is a historic day for Camas, WA – the city has qualified for the Top 6 Towns in the Small Business Revolution Main Street competition and is in the running for a $500,000 investment, a starring role on a Hulu TV series, and life-changing makeovers to local businesses.  Typically only 5 towns are chosen, but this year they threw in a twist and chose 6 towns. Camas is the only town on the west coast chosen in this competition and with a win, would be the first west coast town in this acclaimed series.

And now, Camas needs your help.

The winner among the six remaining towns will be determined by a public vote – and the voting period is open now for a week.  Camasonians, local businesses and advocates are calling on everyone who loves Camas to cast their vote on the Small Business Revolution website (www.smallbusinessrevolution.org) once per day per email. In addition, people can spread the word via social media using the hashtag #MyCamas, and you can see more about the #MyCamas movement at www.mycamas.net

*Simple steps to vote:*

*Go to https://www.deluxe.com/small-business-revolution/main-street/season-four/

*Vote for Camas*

*Vote once per day per email address through February 19th at 6 pm.*

*Click Submit.

Camas has overcome long odds to get into the Top 6 Towns, having been one of more than 12,000 towns from across the country to submit nominations for the competition. With voting underway, the community accumulating the most votes will receive a $500,000 investment, which includes assistance and transformation of six small businesses—all of which will be filmed on location in Camas as part of an 8-part original Hulu TV series hosted by Ty Pennington and Amanda Brinkman.

“We are beside ourselves with excitement to be in the Top 6. This is an incredible opportunity for all of us here in Camas to receive not just funding, but national exposure along with advice and mentorship from
nationally-renowned marketers,” said Carrie Schulstad, Executive Director for the Downtown Camas Association. “Cities that have previously been featured on the show have said it’s been transformational for them, and we couldn’t be more excited to be in the running to be part of this incredible
project.”

Insurance
www.AgentJeremiah.com

“Camas is a mill town in transition. We have worked hard together to revitalize our town and keep our authentic small town experience which is so important to preserve. We have an extensive amount of growth all around us and we want to stay vibrant and relevant. We need help preserving and strengthening this little slice of Americana.”

“The pride Camas residents have in our town is one of the city’s best attributes, and we’re calling on people to display that pride by taking just a few moments every day for the next week to vote,” continued Schulstad. “The #MyCamas movement has been phenomenal to watch and we need to take it to even greater heights over the next week.”

In November it was announced that among the 12,000+ applications submitted to the show, Camas had made the Top 10 Towns. In January, a crew from the show, including host Amanda Brinkman, visited Camas as city leaders, local businesses and advocates made their pitch for why Camas should make the Top 5.

The Small Business Revolution Main Street series showcases one small town and six of its small businesses each year. 2019 will be Season 4. The efforts are funded by Deluxe Corporation, a company that has been working with small businesses in marketing and finance for over a century.

The goal of the show is to document the joys and challenges of owning a small business, why supporting small businesses is so important to communities everywhere, and the powerful changes that can happen when effective and creative marketing and business management techniques are employed. The overall efforts lead to community pride and investment on a grand scale. Prior seasons can be watched on Hulu, YouTube or on www.smallbusinessrevolution.org.

For our town video, photos and info, visit
https://www.deluxe.com/small-business-revolution/main-street/camas-wa/.

For more information, visit www.mycamas.netwww.smallbusinessrevolution.org
or www.facebook.com/smallbizrev

Main Street
35 local residents gathered at 5:30 am to hear the announcement.

Twelve thousand nominations from across the U.S. submitted nominations for the Small Business Revolution Main Street competition, and now Camas, Washington is just days away from finding out if they will make it into the Top 5. The final Top 5 Towns will be announced Tuesday morning, February 12, at 5:30 a.m. Pacific time. People can watch the announcement on Facebook Live at www.facebook.com/smallbizrev

Upon the announcement, the voting period will begin immediately and last for a week, with people able to cast their ballots on the Small Business Revolution website (https://www.deluxe.com/small-business-revolution/main-street/season-four/) once per day per email. This link will be active at 5:30 am on February 12.

The community accumulating the most votes will receive a $500,000 investment, which includes assistance and transformation of six small businesses—all of which will be filmed on location in Camas as part of an 8-part original Hulu TV series hosted by Ty Pennington and Amanda Brinkman.

Camas leaders are calling on the community to spread the message far and wide on social media with the #MyCamas hashtag – get ready to vote as often as possible beginning on Tuesday should the town make the final Top 5. You can see more about the #MyCamas movement at www.mycamas.net and by viewing this video (https://vimeo.com/315772233).

First Friday
www.lisaleproperties.com

“We’re on the cusp of the rest of America finding out what everyone here already knows: that Camas is truly a great American small town,” said Carrie Schulstad, Executive Director for the Downtown Camas Association. “With that in mind, the opportunity to receive funding along with expertise from world-class marketers will help our merchants grow, thrive and overcome the obstacles that are challenging them at present.

“Camas is a town with unlimited potential and helping unlock it could be life-changing for our business owners,” continued Schulstad. “Having said that, even just making the top-10 has been a jolt of energy for our town. People are rallying together to help spread the word through the #MyCamashashtag on social media, and no matter what happens, this energy will continue and help drive pride and growth in the city.” 

In November it was announced that among the 12,000+ applications submitted to the show, Camas had made the list of Top10 Towns. In January, a crew from the show, including host Amanda Brinkman, visited Camas as city leaders, local businesses and advocates made their pitch for why Camas should make the Top 5.

The Small Business Revolution Main Street series showcases one small town and six of its small businesses each year. 2019 will be Season 4. The efforts are funded by Deluxe Corporation, a company that has been working with small businesses in marketing and finance for over a century.

The goal of the show is to document the joys and challenges of owning a small business, why supporting small businesses is so important to communities everywhere, and the powerful changes that can happen when effective and creative marketing and business management techniques are employed. The overall efforts lead to community pride and investment on a grand scale. Prior seasons can be watched on Hulu, YouTube or on www.smallbusinessrevolution.org.

For more information, visit www.mycamas.net, www.smallbusinessrevolution.org or www.facebook.com/smallbizrev

With the city of Seattle, and now some state lawmakers, continuing the push for a local income tax, state Rep. Brandon Vick has again introduced legislation that would prevent local governments from implementing an income tax.

House Bill 1588, with 16 co-sponsors, would prevent local governments from imposing an income tax on an individual’s or household’s income. It is similar to legislation Vick introduced in May of 2017 in response to the cities of Seattle, Olympia and Port Townsend trying to find a way around the local income tax law.

“Once again, this measure clarifies the prohibition on the ability of local governments to impose an income tax,” said Vick, R-Vancouver. “This issue is not going away until we tighten the local income tax statutes even further. Despite many of us believing that current law is clear, Seattle along with the support of legislators in the Puget Sound region are pushing the state Supreme Court to allow an income tax.”

In January, the Washington State Supreme Court declined to take up a lower-court ruling that struck down Seattle’s income tax and instead sent the case to the Court of Appeals. However, the city of Seattle indicated they were not giving up and were taking their arguments to the Court of Appeals.

Since then, several Democrat lawmakers have filed an amicus brief arguing Seattle and cities across Washington state already have the right to impose an income tax.

Town Hall
From left: Representative-elect Larry Hoff, Senator Ann River, and Representative Brandon Vick.

“With local governments and now some lawmakers in Olympia working in favor of an income tax, along with the governor’s push for a capital gains income tax, someone needs to stand up and protect our taxpayers,” said Vick. “Voters in Washington state have repeatedly rejected income tax proposals. Let’s quit ignoring them and pass this bill once and for all.”

Washington state voters have rejected a statewide income tax seven times since the Washington State Supreme Court overturned Initiative 69 in 1933. The latest being in 2010 when the proposed income tax measure failed in all 39 counties with a 64 percent “no” vote.

“The drive to implement local and capital gains income taxes comes at a time when we are seeing record taxpayer revenues come into the state,” said Vick.

Current Washington state law reads “a county, city, or city-county shall not levy a tax on net income.” It is a result of Camas’ Citizen of the Century and former Sen. Hal Zimmerman introducing Senate Bill 4313 in 1984. He drafted the legislation in response to an Attorney’s General (AG) opinion initiated by questions from Clark County. Zimmerman wanted to clear up any doubt created by the AG opinion about city-county government being able to have an income tax.

Vick’s bill has been referred to the House Finance Committee. The Legislature’s 105-day session is scheduled to adjourn on April 28.

Camas, WA — 100 Women Who Care Clark County is holding their organization’s first event of 2019 on Wednesday, February 6 at Grains of Wrath in Downtown Camas.

The social hour is from 5-6 pm, with the event officially beginning at 6 pm.

Grains of Wrath will be featuring a special cocktail just for the group’s members with $2 from each drink purchase going to their chosen non profit. How cool is that? 100 Women Who Care Clark County will have a table of hosted appetizers and GOW will be serving their full dinner menu for those who are interested.

The group was founded last year by Christie Ribary, who has since moved to California — and its membership soared, raising more than $38,000 in its inaugural year. This makes it one of the fastest growing chapters in the organization’s history.

“We’re really grateful for the efforts by Christie for starting this amazing organization here in Clark County,” said Deanna Rusch, who now leads 100 Women Who Care Clark County.

During the event, each member writes the name of a charitable organization on a piece of paper, and places that information into a bucket. Three names are drawn, and each organization is discussed. By ballot, the members vote on which charitable group they would like to donate to,  and the votes are tallied. By the end of the hour, the goal is to raise $10,000 ($100 from each member).

The group welcomes all women in Clark County to come and see what they’re all about — you do not need to be a member to attend the event. Come and learn about what their special group of women is doing to make immediate and powerful change in the community!

Meeting Dates for 2019: Feb 6, May 8, Aug 7, Nov 6

To learn more, visit 100womenclarkcounty.com

Welcome to our Weekly Food + Dining Guide!

Last Thursday, Hey Jack tested several new pizza options during a special happy hour — and it was a big hit with customers! So, they are brining in their new pizzas this coming Wednesday. Stay tuned for updates here and on our social media sites.

Reservations call: 360-954-5053

Email: don@heyjackkitchen.com

Visit: www.HeyJackKitchen.com

 

Grains of Wrath — Downtown Camas

Dining

The Octagon, James Westfall, and Dr. Kenneth Noisewater are being released February 5 at 6 pm.

Grains of Wrath is releasing three cans on the same days at the same time. The big one is called the Octagon, but they also named the other two. One is James Westfall and the other is Dr. Kenneth Noisewater. You play your cards right, you just might get to meet the whole gang.

The Octagon is a double IPA canned exclusively in crawlers. James Westfall and Dr. Kenneth Noisewater are good ‘ok West Coast IPAs, and they’ll be coming out in 16 ounce cans. You can only buy them as a set, and they’ll include a T-shirt and some other surprises.

Hours: Monday-Thursday, 11 am-10 pm; Friday-Saturday, 11 am-12 am; Sunday, 11 am-9 pm; Happy hour is 3-6 weekdays. They are located at 230 NE 5th Ave. Camas, WA 98607

Phone: 360-210-5717

Visit: www.gowbeer.com

 

Feast at 316 — Downtown Camas

Dining

Chicken Fried Pork Belly, which is made of Panko crusted pork belly, blue cheese cream, and date compote.

Come try the Chicken Fried Pork Belly, which is made of Panko crusted pork belly, blue cheese cream, and date compote, as well as a new French Onion Soup served with a sliced baguette lightly covered in cheese.

Also delicious is the “Ploughmans Feast,” which has chorizo & cornflake scotch egg, frisée, grapes, caper berries, canbozola cheese, rye crouton, branson pickle, and radish.

Located in the heart of historic Downtown Camas, Washington, Feast @316 offers one of the best dining experiences in the Northwest with Fresh Seafood, Certified Angus Beef, Craft Cocktails, and Signature Wines. Located in Downtown Camas at 316 NE Dallas St.

Hours: Monday-Thursday, 11:30 am-9 pm; Friday + Saturday, 11:30 am-10 pm; Sunday, 4-9 pm; Happy Hour, Monday-Friday 3-5 pm.

Phone: 360-210-7498

Visit: www.CamasFeast316.com

 

2 Rivers Bar & Grill — Downtown Washougal 

Dining

Brunch at 2 Rivers Bar and Grill.

On top of their new menu items, 2 Rivers Bar and Grill offers a delicious brunch on Saturdays and Sundays.

Their brunch includes French Toast Sticks, Belgian Waffles, Chicken And Waffle, Biscuits and Gravy, Monte Crisco, The Skillet Scrambler, Breakfast Hash, Brunch Salad, Brunch Flatbread, 2 Rivers Salmon Cake Benedict, and more!

New Menu items

Homemade Pretzel with beer cheese fondue — made with Gouda, Breakside Pilsner, and a little Dijon. Served all day. $8.

Baked Brie served with apple slices stuffed with dried fruit and brown sugar. Served all day. $8

Calamari Plate — lightly fried and served with raspberry sweet chili sauce. Seasoned with salt, pepper, ancho chili, paprika. Served all day. $10

2 Rivers Chicken Sandwich — grilled chicken breast with bacon, guacamole with chipotle aioli. Served all day. $14

Fettuccine Alfredo $12, with chicken, add $4.

2 Rivers Bar and Grill is located at 1700 Main Street, Suite 110, Washougal, WA 98671.

Phone: 360-210-7987

Hours: 11-9 Monday-Thursday; 11-midnight Friday and Saturday; Sundays: 11-6

Visit: https://www.restaurantji.com/wa/washougal/2-rivers-bar-and-grill-/

 

Hana Korean — Downtown Camas

Dining

Bul-Go-Gi at Hana.

For those who know and appreciate Korean food, Hana is the real deal. Hana offers Korean, teriyaki, noodles, combinations, and sides at reasonable prices. A customer favorite is the Bi Bim Bop, as well as the Bul-Go-Gi, which is thinly sliced marinated beef, stir-fried vegetables, and steamed rice. Portion sizes are generous. Located in the heart of Downtown Camas at 412 NE 4th Ave.

Hours: Monday-Saturday, 11 am-8:30 pm

Phone: 360-833-9111

 

The Hammond Kitchen and Craft Bar — Camas

Dining

Mushroom toast, fresh grilled focaccia, roasted garlic, house ricotta, mushroom ragou, pecorino cheese.

The Hammond Kitchen and Craft Bar is showcasing their new Social Hour Menu, which happens Monday-Friday from 4-6 pm and Saturday and Sunday from 3-6 pm. We’re highlighting the Crispy Sesame Pork Strips with ginger soy aioli and sweet chili sauce.

Located at 4857 NW Lake Road, #200, Camas, WA 98607.

Hours: Monday-Thursday, 11:00 am-9 pm; Friday, 11:00 am-10 pm; Saturday, 10:30 am-10 pm; Sunday, 10:30-10 pm; Social Hour, Monday-Friday 3-6 pm, plus Saturday + Sunday, 3-6 pm.

Phone: 360-954-5620

Visit: www.TheHammondKitchenandCraftBar.com

 

Nuestra Mesa — Downtown Camas

Dining

Pollo Asado entree made with Mary’s Chicken grilled and placed on top of rajas con crema and served with an assortment of salsas and housemade corn tortillas.

A few months ago, Nuestra Mesa decided to revamp their menu to focus more on farm to table, fresh ingredients from local farmers and staying true to that small business mentality. As you may have known, a few months ago we acquired a new head chef and he has been doing some incredible things for Mesa.

The result is 14 amazing new menu options, which includes three new platillos pequenos (starters), three new enseladas (salads), a new sopa (soup), one new taco, and six stunning new platillos fuertes (entrees).

We sampled the Ceviche, with wild shrimp and calamari cured in a lime tomatillo vinaigrette, derived with grilled tomatillo and tomato, pickled red onion, jalapeño, chile oil, and micro cilantro.

We also tried the Macienda Blue Corn Huraches, with rewrites, foraged mushrooms, arugula, avocado, guajillo salsa, topped with micro cilantro, and it’s served on a house made macienda blue corn cake! It’s so delicious!

And, our final sample was the Crisp Bruselas (Brussel Sprouts),which is served with chorizo, poached egg, house made chic harmonies, and topped with tajin. This is a complete change from their previous brussel sprouts recipe.

Located at 228 NE 4th Avenue, in Downtown Camas, Mesa offers gourmet Mexican cuisine. It’s a family friendly location.

Hours: Monday-Thursday, 11:30 am-9 pm; Friday + Saturday, 11:30 am-10 pm; Closed Sundays.

Phone: 360-210-5311

Visit: www.NuestraMesaCamas.com

 

Caffe Piccolo — Downtown Camas

Dining

Gluten free muffins at Caffe Piccolo with apricot and blueberries. Sweetened with applesauce.

Each day, you can come try a new soup for lunch, along with one of our great espressos, lattes and speciality coffee drinks — featuring Caffe Umbria. For breakfast or brunch, we have delicious breakfast sandwiches and panini’s. Come to relax, unwind, or open your laptop and have a remote office. People love to meet her socially or for casual business meetings. We’d love to see you. 400 Northeast Fourth Avenue, Camas, WA, at the corner of Fourth & Cedar

Hours: Open Monday – Friday 7 am – 5 pm, Saturday 8 am – 4 pm, Sunday 9 am – 3 pm

Phone: 360-834-7044

Visit: www.caffe-piccolo.com

 

Navidi’s Olive Oils & Vinegars — Downtown Camas

Dining

Winter warmer pairings at Navidi’s.

We’ve got some Special Deals for the New Year! From now until Valentine’s Day, our Cayenne Chili and Limonato Fused Olive Oils and our California Koroneiki and Spanish Picual EVOOs are 50% off! Cayenne Chili is great for Latin/Caribbean and South/Southeast Asian dishes where you want a healthy kick of spice! Limonato is a green Eureka Lemon from Tunisia. Use it in recipes like salads, roast veggies, chicken, and seafood where you want a bright citrus flavor, but something a little mellower than your old fave Meyer Lemon Fused Olive Oil.

Navidi’s has a long tradition of providing the best olive oils, vinegars, speciality salts and seasonings to make your meals extraordinary. Visit us today to sample our fabulous oils and vinegars, which also make great gifts. 322 NE Cedar Street, Camas, WA 98607

Hours: Monday thru Saturday 11 am – 6 pm and Sunday noon – 5 pm.

Phone: 360-210-5921

Visit: www.navidioiols.net

Running a business is hard work, especially for a single mother. It requires discipline, strategy, planning, and perseverance, but Lisa Lê, owner of Lisa Lê Properties — A Boutique Experience, says it’s mostly about building relationships.

And that’s the way she structured her real estate boutique — on serving others.

“I am passionate about helping my clients find their forever home, or helping them get the most value from the home they want to sell, so they can get top dollar and get the right new owners in place so it feels like a perfect fit on both sides,” says Lê. “I like to create different marketing campaigns to help sell homes.”

The accomplished realtor, with four college degrees (criminal justice, political science, psychology and sociology) set up shop on 4th Avenue in Downtown Camas and immediately created a welcoming space for business and social functions. She’s also well-known for her 24/7 Window Vision Display, which is an interactive touchscreen system showcasing homes and local businesses.

“People love it,” said Lê. “They can come by anytime to see our 24/7 RMLS feed to see any listing in Clark County. “It’s a great conversation starter.”

Carrie Schulstad, Executive Director of the Downtown Camas Association (DCA), says the window display is a big draw in the downtown area. The window itself has achieved local accolades, and earned Lê a prestigious DCA award: 2018 Outstanding Window Display.

Lê works very hard to make sure people feel welcome in our community.

“I’m also a big believer in giving back,” she said.

Lisa Lê

Lisa Lê helps out with a back-to-school supplies project.

After becoming a single mom, Lê founded a Divorce Empowerment Alliance Advisory Group, with the mission to educate, support, and empower anyone navigating the uncharted waters of separation or divorce. The group is composed of experts who are available to assist those in need.

She also believes local businesses need to support one another, so she founded Collaborative Camas, a network of Camas businesses that meets regularly to discuss challenges, solutions, and to simply socialize.

Lisa Lê Properties — A Boutique Experience also works closely with the Camas Hotel, with whom she partnered to create the Keys To Camas program, which gives shoppers discounts and incentives to shop local. Lê’s work on this program is what earned her business the DCA’s 2018 Creative Local Marketing Award.

Lisa Lé

Lisa Lê won two prestigious DCA awards.

“We have a great history here in Camas, plus many great businesses that we want people to know about,” she said. “It’s a successful program.”

Part of that commitment is shown in her active involvement with the DCA.

“I’m also involved in all their First Friday’s and signature events, which showcase the best of Camas,” said Lê.

And, most recently she was a platinum sponsor of the Camas Wellness Festival, which is a local non-profit organization.

“This is a perfect fit for me and for Lisa Lê Properties; as a woman and mother, I believe strongly in promoting physical and mental health, especially in our children,” said Lê.

She is also a member of Soroptimists International, which is a global volunteer organization that economically empowers women and girls by providing access to education, the single most effective anti-poverty intervention.

If you’d like to visit her, and learn more about her services, please visit her office at 418 NE 4th Avenue in the heart of Downtown Camas.

“I’m just really happy to be part of the Camas community,” said Lê. “It’s a great place to raise a family, and simply enjoy life. Be my guest.”

According to the Camas Police, Camas has been hit hard by vehicle prowlers and thieves this month, and these acts have led to other crimes, including identity theft.

There have been 23 reported prowls and thefts so far for the month of January, reported Camas Police officer, Debra Riedl.

“The prowlers will generally hit one neighborhood/area hard at a time,” said Riedl. “Prowls occur all over our city, but this month has kept us busy on different areas of Prune Hill, Parker Estates, NW Lacamas Lane, the area near Dorothy Fox Elementary, and the SW 6th Ave neighborhood.”

Here’s how you can help:

– Call 911 if you see or hear suspicious activity during early morning or late-night hours. (Prowlers caught on video are often out prowling between 3 and 5 am)

– Keep valuables out of sight or secure in your home.

– Keep weapons secure in your home, not in your vehicles.

– Lock your vehicles and home. (Most of the recent prowls have been unlocked vehicles!)

– Consider keeping your porch lights on.

– If you notice neighborhood vehicles with dome lights on, call 911.

– Don’t be shy. Your Camas police work 24 hours a day, and we’re here to respond to your calls. We often don’t know about the prowls/thefts until after the fact.

Questions? Contact Camas Police Department at 360-834-4151 or stop by 2100 NE 3rd Ave.

 

CAMAS, WA — The Clark County Sheriff’s Office is reporting that George Regis, a 63-year-old pilot, who was last seen departing Grove Field Airport in Camas, is listed as missing.

In their press release, authorities say that Regis departed Grove Field Airport (which is located at 632 NE 267th Ave. in the Fern Prairie area) around noon on Friday, January 25, and that he has not been heard from since that departure.  The Clark County Sheriff’s Office believes Regis may have been traveling Southwest —  to either Arizona or Texas.

His cellular telephone sent a final signal in the Newberg/Dundee, Oregon area on Saturday, January 26. A flight plan was not filed, and is not required of pilots and aircraft departing Grove Field, which is part of the Port of Camas-Washougal.

If anyone has information about Regis or his whereabouts, the authorities are asking you to call 911.

Grove Field is home to many local airplanes, both new and active, as well as vintage, and there are long-range plans to expand the airport. There has been a growing interest in aviation in the last few years, and Grove Field has been instrumental in helping people learn about the industry and how to fly aircraft.