Child

Washougal, WA — April is “Child Abuse Prevention Month” and General Federation of Women’s Clubs of Camas-Washougal (GFWC) has a list of events that they will be participating in. GFWC will be planting pinwheel gardens in Camas and Washougal. Both Cities of Camas and Washougal have signed proclamations to help raise awareness about child abuse prevention.

“This is such an important issue that I feel passionate about raising awareness and getting the word out to our communities.” said Susan Bennett, Vice President of the GFWC Camas-Washougal. “We want families to know that there are resources and places to find help. We want families to feel supported in the important work of raising their children,” added Christine Kamps, President of GFWC.

Bennett serves as the Pinwheel Projects Committee Chair. In an effort to increase the reach and impact of the project this year, she reached out to Unite! Washougal Community Coalition to partner on this project and invited Unite! to plant gardens with the GFWC. “I was so excited to partner with the GFWC on this project!” said Ann Stevens, Unite! Washougal 501c3 President. “GFWC is such a hardworking and dedicated organization that really contributes to the good of our communities! In addition, improving the health and wellness of our youth, families and community is the core mission of Unite!, so this is a perfect project to partner together.”

GFWC, a 501c3 organization, has been serving the cities of Camas and Washougal since 1947. The General Federation of Women’s Clubs is one of the world’s oldest and largest women’s volunteer service organizations. GFWC is a vibrant and connected sisterhood of women who are creating better communities, expanding their own possibilities, and extending friendship and support to women near and far.

Unite! Washougal Community Coalition is a substance misuse prevention coalition that works with all sectors of the community to increase community connections and promote health and wellness. “We are always looking for community partners that want to promote connection, health and wellness in our community, remarked Angela Hancock, Unite! Vice President. “We also have other resources for parents and our community including parenting classes such as Incredible Years, and our semi-annual Drug Take Back on April 24th from 10 am to 2 pm.”

Both organizations are seeking new members who want to volunteer, learn new skills and serve their communities. For more information and resources to help prevent child abuse visit: https://www.childwelfare.gov/topics/preventing/preventionmonth/resources/resource-guide/  For more information about the General Federation of Women’s Clubs please email GFWC Camas-Washougal at [email protected], contact Susan Bennet at (916) 330-7932 or visit their Facebook page GFWC Camas-Washougal.  For more information about Unite! contact Margaret McCarthy at washougalunite.com or call (360) 954-3203. Unite! meets the 4th Thursday of every Month at 3 PM. Currently, meetings are by zoom. Check out our Facebook page or Website for more information. http://unitewashougal.org/

1 reply
  1. Frank Sterle Jr.
    Frank Sterle Jr. says:

    Really, shouldn’t every day of the year be Child Abuse Prevention Month?

    Trauma from unchecked child abuse/neglect typically results in the helpless child’s brain improperly developing. If allowed to continue for a prolonged period, it acts as his/her starting point into an adolescence and (in particular) an adulthood in which its brain uncontrollably releases potentially damaging levels of inflammation-promoting stress hormones and chemicals, even in non-stressful daily routines.

    In short, it can make every day an emotional/psychological ordeal, unless the mental turmoil is doused with some form of self-medicating.

    Meanwhile, general society perceives thus treats human procreative rights as though we’ll somehow, in blind anticipation, be innately inclined to sufficiently understand and appropriately nurture our children’s naturally developing minds and needs. I find that mentality — however widely practiced — wrong and needing re-evaluation, however unlikely that will ever happen.

    Proactive measures in order to avoid having to later reactively treat (often with tranquilizing medication) potentially serious and life-long symptoms caused by a dysfunctional environment, neglect and/or abuse. And if we’re to avoid the dreadedly invasive conventional reactive means of intervention—that of governmental forced removal of children from dysfunctional/abusive home environments—maybe we then should be willing to try an unconventional proactive means of preventing some future dysfunctional/abusive family situations. Child development science curriculum might be one way.
    Also, mental health-care needs to generate as much societal concern — and government funding — as does physical health, even though psychological illness/dysfunction typically is not immediately visually observable.

    I wonder how many instances there have been wherein immense long-term suffering by children of dysfunctional rearing might have been prevented had the parent(s) received, as high school students, some crucial parenting or child development education by way of mandatory curriculum? After all, dysfunctional and/or abusive parents, for example, may not have had the chance to be anything else due to their lack of such education and their own dysfunctional/abusive rearing as children.

    For decades, I’ve strongly felt that a psychologically and emotionally sound (as well as a physically healthy) future should be all children’s foremost right — especially considering the very troubled world into which they never asked to enter — and therefore child development science should be learned long before the average person has their first child.

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